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FREE Online Resources at Everyday Thai Language School

A Guide to Thai Grammar Books

Free Thai learning materials…

I’m a Thai language resource junkie so was chuffed when Remi pointed me to the Thai language resources at Everyday Thai Language School. Thanks Remi! I owe.

Everyday Thai Language School’s FREE online resources…

Everyday Thai Language School’s Free Thai language study aids are in four main groups covering beginner to advanced levels.

1) Language exercises, Thai flashcards, and listening quizzes. Developed from the course books used at Everyday Thai Language School. Audio included.

Speaking Everyday Thai: Thai Learning aids for Beginner level 1 and 2
Speaking Everyday Thai: Thai Learning aids for Intermediate level 1 and 2
Speaking Everyday Thai: Thai Learning aids for High-intermediate

2) Self-study materials created from the FSI (Foreign Service Institute) Thai language course. These materials are for reading practice. Thai script only (no English transliteration). No audio.

Self-study: Basic Thai language reader

3) Short stories to improve listening and reading. Includes flashcards, quizzes, games and audio files. Created from the materials at VOA (Voice of America).

Self-study: Advanced Thai language reader

4) A decent selection of YouTube music videos dubbed with Thai lyrics, English translation, and Thai transliteration.

Self-study: Learn Thai through music

Everyday Thai Language School put a fair amount of work into making these Thai resources available to the public. And while I haven’t had a chance to go through all the sections, this looks to be a valuable addition to the online Thai learning community. Well done ETL!

These resources have now been added to WLT’s FREE Thai language learning resources page. And if you are sitting on any other free Thai language resources, please contact me.

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My passion is promoting the Thai language. Fullstop. Oh, and traveling. I'm passionate about that as well. And photography too.

11 Comments

  1. Thanks Cat, I was looking for something like this yesterday and came up a bit short.

  2. You are welcome Lawrence. Due to the sound files + quizzes it’s a great find. There are not enough of either available for Thai.

  3. Catherine – I’ve bookmarked Thai Learning aids for Beginners level 1 and 2. The resource is full of the learning tools I like, quizzes and games. I like that form of learning rather than the regimental Sergeant Major approach. Although whether the former or latter is best I don’t know. Anyhow you’ve highlighted another great FREE Thai language resource.

    Now to other matters.

    I’ve noticed for a long time that you choose to open external links in the same window. I’ve been doing a bit of research into this because I prefer them opening in a new window. It seems your method is favoured by the experts but not necessarily by the foot soldiers.

    In the case of this post comment I have referenced to Thai Learning aids (your external link) and to do that I’ve had to open it via my bookmark in order to view both. That’s easier for me than dancing back and forth in the same window. I’m wondering how your readers feel about external links and the windows they open in. Also, is there any reason why you choose your links to open how they do. SEO?…Just curious.

  4. Martyn, glad to hear that this resource is appreciated and will get used. I plan on poking around in it next week.

    Now on to the matter of opening all links in the same window…

    You are right, professional web designers create sites that leave the option up to the reader. For instance, on my computer I click command to open a new window or nadda if I want the same window. Not sure what you click for Windows but there’s an equivalent. Or, you can set it at your browser level in the prefs (I believe).

    As far as how readers feel… I’ve never asked because it’s not industry standard to take the control away from readers. And truthfully, just the thought of my site going back yaks ages in time (and getting gafawed at by other designers in the process) is making me cringe :-D

    It has nothing to do with SEO – unless someone has dreamed up an explanation of some such in the past few years?

    Btw: There are a few plugins on my site that opens things in new windows and it drives me crazy. As soon as I remember/find them, I recode the plugins.

  5. I think general thought is that people nowadays are smart enough to know how to open a link in a new window if they want. In other words, let them make their own choice and don’t force your design onto them.

  6. That’s exactly how I feel Lawrence. But years back it was a new mindset and I fought against it. Now I can’t imagine it being any other way.

    Martyn just shared a link on twitter from when I switched over. My buddy David and I discussed it to no end and he eventually took the conversation to his readers: Should links open in a new window?

  7. This would be a great learning for those who love to try to speak other languages. Thanks for the information. I hope I could read more of your post.

  8. Hi Cat, truly appreciate you for providing this free lesson for us :) I will visit Thailand in the next two month, maybe I must start with Beginner level 1 and 2. emm, I got many links in your post, little bit over load heh.. Thanks

  9. Yes, links should open in a new window, if there’s a possibility of needing both windows open…for reference, or if link takes you to a different website. Stray and I were just discussing this yesterday, when he had to read some legislation (accessed via a link) and answer questions about, which were on the page he’d just exited.

    Something I’m really aware of when designing my own sites. If I want to keep readers there (trapped ;) I never open a page in a new window. I have visited sites where EVERY internal link opened in a new window…which is very confusing and messy.

    Another great resource you’ve found Catherine!

  10. Just wondering Catherine, where your passion for the Thai language comes from? Do you visit there a lot?

  11. Mike, when I lived on Borneo, I started coming to Thailand 2-3 times a year for about ten years (island fever was a problem and Thailand was the answer). When I left I moved to Thailand – over ten years ago now.

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