A Woman Learning Thai...and some men too ;)

Learn Thai Language & Thai Culture

HouseTalk: Learn Mostly Useful Thai Laundry Phrases

HouseTalk: Learn Thai Laundry Phrases

HouseTalk: Introduction to the laundry section…

If you are a gal a percentage of the chats with your Thai housekeeper will focus on the care of your laundry. And if you don’t, you just might find yourself with an eye-raising wardrobe. If you are a guy, well, I’m not a guy so I don’t have a clue what you do. Hold your breath?

This section is big so it’s been separated into several parts: Mostly useful Thai laundry phrases, washer and dryer phrases, ironing phrases, and what gets washed with what.

Some of the Thai phrases in this section might never get used but others will become a staple in your Thai laundry repertoire.

A chunk of the instructions, but not all, have been compiled by hindsight. If truth be known, I spend more time waggling my eyebrows and smiling than ordering my housekeeper around. I leave the cleaning decisions up to her, only giving instructions if a bad habit develops or if a change in the weekly schedule is needed.

But guaranteed, you’ll find the sentence patterns handy for non-cleaning subjects as well.

This section also talks about being polite but please be assured a dedicated post on manners will come later. The aim is to get you adding a touch of sweetness before your Thai housekeeper quits on you. Not after.

Note: Insert your vocabulary of choice where this sound occurs:


(Yes, that’s me. And it’s most likely the only sound you’ll ever hear from me too ;-)

Laundry, the basics: Clean, dirty ripped or torn…

These clothes are clean.
เสื้อผ้า นี่ สะอาด
sêua-pâa nêe sà-àat


Pattern: These clothes are ___
เสื้อผ้า นี่ ___
sêua-pâa nêe ___


Sample: These clothes are not clean.
เสื้อผ้า นี่ ไม่ สะอาด
sêua-pâa nêe mâi sà-àat


Adjective 1: clean: สะอาด /sà-àat/, dirty: ไม่ สะอาด /mâi sà-àat/, stained: เป็น คราบ /bpen krâap/, ripped/torn/worn ขาด /kàat/, old: เก่า /gào/, new: ใหม่ /mài/


And guess what? If you switch out everything but นี่ you’ll be smoking in Thai!

Pattern: This (noun) (is) (adjective)
___(noun) นี่ ___(adjective)


Sample: ชุด นี่ เซ็กซี่
chút nêe sék-sêe


Vocab: The sky is the limit.

Tip: Change out the noun with shirt, pants, dress, pj’s, towels, etc. And then change out the adjective with ripped/torn/worn, stained, old, or whatever it is. Smoking!

Dry-cleaning…

I’ve almost given up on dry-cleaning (my one and only shirt needing dry-cleaning was turfed into the washer and then the dryer) but you might need a few phrases so here they are.

Feature: This: นี่ /nêe/

Use this phrase when you have the item in your hand:

This (is) dry-clean only.
นี่ ซักแห้ง เท่านั้น
nêe sák-hâeng tâo-nán


Use this phrase when you have clothes (plural) in your hand:

These clothes (are) dry-clean only.
เสื้อผ้า นี่ ซักแห้ง เท่านั้น
sêua-pâa nêe sák-hâeng tâo-nán


The pattern for defining what it is (singular):

Pattern: This ____ (is) dry-clean only.
____ นี่ ซักแห้ง เท่านั้น
____ nêe sák-hâeng tâo-nán


Sample: This dress is dry-clean only.
ชุด นี่ ซักแห้ง เท่านั้น
chút nêe sák-hâeng tâo-nán


But if you have three or more use พวกนี้ /pûak-née/ (this group) instead of นี่ /nêe/ (this).

Pattern: These ____(noun) (are) dry-clean only.
____ พวกนี้ ซักแห้ง เท่านั้น
____ pûak-née sák-hâeng tâo-nán


Sample: These dresses are dry-clean only.
ชุด พวกนี้ ซักแห้ง เท่านั้น
chút pûak-née sák-hâeng tâo-nán


Noun 1: shirt: เสื้อ /sêua/, pants: กางเกง /gaang-gayng/, dress: ชุด /chút/, evening dress: ชุดราตรี /chút-raa-dtree/, jacket: เสื้อกันหนาว /sêua-gan-năao/


Feature: To take away: เอาไป /ao-bpai/

Use these phrases when you have the item in your hand:

Take to the dry-cleaners.
เอาไป ซักแห้ง ให้ หน่อย
ao-bpai sák-hâeng hâi nòi


Take this to the dry-cleaners.
เอา นี่ ไป ซักแห้ง ให้ หน่อย
ao nêe bpai sák-hâeng hâi nòi


And this is the pattern for defining what it is (singular):

Take this ___ to the dry-cleaners.
เอา ___ นี่ ไป ซักแห้ง ให้ หน่อย
ao ___ nêe bpai sák-hâeng hâi nòi


Sample: Take this shirt to the dry-cleaners.
เอา เสื้อ นี่ ไป ซักแห้ง ให้ หน่อย
ao sêua nêe bpai sák-hâeng hâi nòi


Noun 1: shirt: เสื้อ /sêua/, pants: กางเกง /gaang-gayng/, dress: ชุด /chút/, evening dress: ชุด ราตรี /chút raa-dtree/, jacket: เสื้อ กันหนาว /sêua gan-năao/


And when you have a stack of clothes:

Take these clothes to the drycleaners.
เอา เสื้อผ้า นี่ ไป ซักแห้ง ให้ หน่อย
ao sêua-pâa nêe bpai sák-hâeng hâi nòi


Manners…

Did you notice the ให้ หน่อย /hâi nòi/ at the end of the sentence? It softens the demand from an older person to a younger person. But if your housekeeper is older than you, use the polite particle นะคะ /ná-ká/ (female) or /นะครับ /ná-kráp/ (male) instead.

ให้ has five meanings: for (to do something for someone), to give, to assign, to allow, and to become. And when ให้ /hâi/ and หน่อย /nòi/ are used together it means “for me (with a little bit of your time /energy)”, and becomes a softener.

But if your maid is older than you it’s not soft enough so end the sentence with นะคะ /ná-ká/ or นะครับ /ná-kráp/.

Sample (older): Take this dress to the dry cleaners.
เอา ชุด นี่ ไป ซักแห้ง นะคะ / นะครับ
ao chút nêe bpai sák-hâeng ná ká / ná kráp




Sample (younger): เอา ชุด นี่ ไป ซักแห้ง ให้ หน่อย
ao chút nêe bpai sák-hâeng hâi nòi


General rule of thumb: When demanding/requesting that your housekeeper do something, soften the command by using the appropriate polite particles OR soften your voice on the last syllables.

Feature: Must be: ต้อง /dtông/

This must be washed by hand.
นี่ ต้อง ซัก ด้วย มือ
nêe dtông sák dûay meu


Pattern: This ___ must be washed by hand.
___ นี่ ต้อง ซัก ด้วย มือ
___ nêe dtông sák dûay meu


Sample: This fabric must be hand washed.
ผ้า นี่ ต้อง ซัก ด้วย มือ
pâa nêe dtông sák dûay meu


Noun 2: fabric: ผ้า /pâa/, shirt: เสื้อ /sêua/, pants: กางเกง /gaang-gayng/, dress: ชุด /chút/, evening dress: ชุด ราตรี /chút raa-dtree/, jacket: เสื้อ กันหนาว /sêua gan-năao/, nightgown: ชุดนอน /chút-non/, tablecloth: ผ้าปูโต๊ะ /pâa-bpoo-dto/


Pattern: This must be ___ (verb)
นี่ ต้อง ___
nêe dtông ___


Sample: This must be washed.
นี่ ต้อง ซัก
nêe dtông sák


Pattern: This ___ (noun) must be ___ (verb)
___ นี่ ต้อง ___
___ nêe dtông ___


Sample: The jacket must be dry-cleaned.
เสื้อกันหนาว นี่ ต้อง ซักแห้ง
sêua-gan-năao nêe dtông sák-hâeng


Noun 2: fabric: ผ้า /pâa/, shirt: เสื้อ /sêua/, pants: กางเกง /gaang-gayng/, dress: ชุด /chút/, evening dress: ชุด ราตรี /chút raa-dtree/, jacket: เสื้อกันหนาว /sêua-gan-năao/, nightgown: ชุดนอน /chút-non/, tablecloth: ผ้าปูโต๊ะ /pâa-bpoo-dto/


Verb 2: washed: ซัก /sák/, hand washed: ซักมือ /sák-meu/, ironed: รีด /rêet/, washed and ironed ซัก แล้วก็ รีด /sák láew-gôr rêet/, dry-cleaned: ซักแห้ง /sák-hâeng/, mended/patched: ปะ /bpa/, repaired ซ่อม /sôm/, hung: แขวน /kwăen/, washed separately: ซัก แยก /sák yâek/, wash separated แยก ซัก /yâek sák/


You can use that pattern for all sorts of commands out of the house as well.

Feature: Do not and must: ไม่ได้ /mâi-dâi/ ต้อง /dtông/

Hang in air or sun.
แขวน ตาก ลม หรือไม่ ก็แดด
kwăen dtàak lom rĕu-mâi gôr-dàet


Do not dry in sun.
ตากแดด ไม่ได้
dtàak-dàet mâi-dâi


This cloth/clothes must hang in air or sun.
ผ้า นี่ ต้อง ตาก ลม หรือไม่ ก็ แดด
pâa nêe dtông dtàak lom rĕu-mâi gôr dàet


Pattern: This ___ must hang in air or sun.
___ นี่ ต้อง ตาก ลม หรือไม่ ก็ แดด
___ nêe dtông dtàak lom rĕu-mâi gôr dàet


Sample: This dress must hang in the air or sun.
ชุด นอน นี่ ต้อง ตาก ลม หรือไม่ ก็ แดด
chút non nêe dtông dtàak lom rĕu-mâi gôr dàet


Noun 2: fabric: ผ้า /pâa/, shirt: เสื้อ /sêua/, pants: กางเกง /gaang-gayng/, dress: ชุด /chút/, evening dress: ชุด ราตรี /chút raa-dtree/, jacket: เสื้อ กันหนาว /sêua gan-năao/, nightgown: ชุดนอน /chút-non/, tablecloth: ผ้าปูโต๊ะ /pâa-bpoo-dto/


Making sure you don’t get caught out…

As I mentioned in the HouseTalk post, Miscommunicating with Your Thai Housekeeper, the final condition of your clothing is sometimes ignored. Torn, stained and ripped clothes are washed, ironed, and then SURPRISE!

There are three main clothes issues I want my housekeeper to bring to my attention: clothes that are stained, torn/ripped, or missing buttons.

It’s missing a button.
กระดุม หาย
grà-dum hăai


It’s stained.
เป็น คราบ
bpen krâap


It’s torn/ripped.
ขาด
kàat


It’s torn/ripped.
มัน ขาด
man kàat


Adding heat to a stain sets it into the fabric so I do have rules for that too.

Feature: Do not, don’t, never: อย่า /yàa/

Do not put stained clothes in the dryer…
อย่า ใส่ ผ้า ที่ เลอะ เป็น คราบ ใน เครื่องอบ
yàa sài pâa têe lúh bpen krâap nai krêuang-òp


… bring them to me.
เอามา ให้ ฉัน / ผม
ao-maa hâi chăn / pŏm




Do not iron over stains.
อย่า รีด ทับ รอย เปื้อน
yàa rêet táp roi bpêuan


And sometimes it’s too late:

Do not put stained clothes away. Bring them to me.
อย่า เก็บ เสื้อผ้า ที่ เป็น คราบ เอามา ให้ ฉัน / ผม
yàa gèp sêua-pâa têe bpen krâap ao maa hâi chăn / pŏm




Pattern: Do not put ___ clothes away. Bring them to me.
อย่า เก็บ เสื้อผ้า ที่ ___ เอามา ให้ ฉัน / ผม
yàa gèp sêua-pâa têe ___ ao-maa hâi chăn / pŏm




Sample: Do not put ripped/torn/worn clothes away. Bring them to me.
อย่า เก็บ เสื้อผ้า ที่ ขาด เอามา ให้ ฉัน
yàa gèp sêua-pâa têe kàat ao-maa hâi chăn


Adjective 3: stained: เป็น คราบ /bpen krâap/, ripped/torn/worn: ขาด /kàat/


Bring clothes with missing buttons to me.
เอา เสื้อ ที่ กระดุม หาย มา ให้ ฉัน / ผม
ao sêua têe grà-dum hăai maa hâi chăn / pŏm




Pattern: (I) want ___ (noun) with ___ (adjective) brought to me.
เอา ___ ที่ ___ มา ให้ ฉัน / ผม
ao ___ têe ___ maa hâi chăn / pŏm




Sample: (I) want shirts with worn collars brought to me.
เอา เสื้อ ที่ ปกเสื้อ ขาด มา ให้ ฉัน
ao sêua têe bpòk-sêua kàat maa hâi chăn


Noun 5: shirt: เสื้อ /sêua/, pants: กางเกง /gaang-gayng/, dress: ชุด /chút/, evening dress: ชุด ราตรี /chút raa-dtree/, jacket: เสื้อ กันหนาว /sêua gan-năao/, nightgown: ชุดนอน /chút-non/, sheets: ผ้าปูที่นอน /pâa-bpoo-têe-non/, tablecloth: ผ้าปูโต๊ะ /pâa-bpoo-dtó/, napkins: ผ้าเช็ดปาก /pâa-chét-bpàak/, socks: ถุงเท้า /tŭng-táo/, underwear: กางเกงใน /gaang-gayng-nai/, underwear: ชุดชั้นใน /chút-chán-nai/, towels: ผ้าเช็ดตัว /pâa-chét-dtua/


Adjective 4: worn collars: ปกขาด /bpòk-kàat/, holes: เป็นรู /bpen-roo/, stains: เป็น คราบ /bpen-krâap/, rips/tears/wear: ขาด /kàat/


Special instructions…

Occasionally you will be blessed with a housekeeper who enjoys fixing things around the house: stopped drains, faulty wiring, and even clothes. It goes without saying that the polite particles should be added (apologies, I forgot).

Pattern: Please mend ___
ช่วย ปะ ___ นี่ หน่อย นะคะ / นะครับ
chûay bpà ___ nêe nòi ná-ká / ná-kráp




Sample: Please mend this jacket.
ช่วย ปะ เสื้อกันหนาว นี่ หน่อย นะคะ
chûay bpà sêua-gan-năao nêe nòi ná-ká


Noun 1: shirt: เสื้อ /sêua/, pants: กางเกง /gaang-gayng/, dress: ชุด /chút/, evening dress: ชุดราตรี /chút-raa-dtree/, jacket: เสื้อกันหนาว /sêua-gan-năao/


Sew on a button.
เย็บ กระดุม
yép gra-dum


Get the stain out.
ซัก คราบ นี้ ออก
sák krâap née òk


Then there are other times when you need to define what they shouldn’t be doing to your clothes: Adding bleach, adding starch, such as that.

Do not add starch.
อย่า ลง แป้ง
yàa long bpâeng


Do not add bleach.
อย่า ใส่ น้ำยา ซักผ้า ขาว
yàa sài náam-yaa sák-pâa kăao


The first brand of bleach to become popular in Thailand was ไฮเตอร์ /hai-dtêr/ so a Thai will often use it instead of น้ำยาซักผ้าขาว /náam-yaa-sák-pâa-kăao/. It’s the same difference as talking about getting a Xerox.

Do not add bleach.
อย่า ใส่ ไฮเตอร์
yàa sài hai-dtêr


Thai vocabulary for all things laundry…

The below downloads include the Thai script, transliteration, and sound files to the vocabulary in this post. Also included are the sound files to this post. The pdf of the post will come later (I’m rushing rushing this month).

Pdf download 438k: HouseTalk: Vocabulary for Thai laundry phrases
Sound download 2.3mg: Vocabulary for Thai laundry phrases
Sound download 4.5mg: Mostly Useful Thai Laundry Phrases

Please note: The materials are for your own personal use only.

Welcome the Thai HouseTalk series…

I started working on the HouseTalk series way back before my post, the Habits of Highly Effective Expats. As I’ve had a heap of time to think about the series, most subjects will be covered but please go ahead and make suggestions.

If you’ve ever come unstuck when communicating with the Thai help in your life, then the HouseTalk series should make it easier to get instructions across. And the way it’s written, even if you don’t know how to speak Thai, you will be able to communicate by using the downloads (sound files, instructions in both English and Thai script, stickers, and a cleaning calendar).

Connecting posts:

A special thanks for this post goes to Thai Skype teacher Khun Narisa (and everyone else I’ve bugged to tears). If you want to learn more about the patterns used in this post, please contact Khun Narisa as she’s the queen of Thai patterns! Sure, in order to create this post I play with patterns (some) but she checks my work.

Share Button
The following two tabs change content below.
My passion is promoting the Thai language. Fullstop. Oh, and traveling. I'm passionate about that as well. And photography too.

11 Comments

  1. REALLY useful phrases/sentences (even though I’m a bloke). Thanks, Cat. Haven’t tried to download yet, but I will.

  2. I’m glad to hear that Lawrence. When I went to create this series I discovered many for instances to cover. Knowing how to present them was a dilemma so I hope I’ve gone at it in the right way.

  3. Seriously, why can’t my language tutor make lessons this clear?! I think it’s time to study on my own. Keep up the good work. I absolutely love posts like this.

  4. TR, the person behind the patterns is Thai Skype teacher Khun Narisa (she uses Skype and can teach you anywhere in the world). Khun Narisa teaches me patterns, then I go off to create pattens of my own. And before they go live here, she corrects any mistakes I make. Creating patterns is a fantastic way to learn Thai.

  5. Girl! I don’t know how you do it. How you manage to do so much! I like this new series…looking forward to the later installments.

    Thanks for all your hard work na ka :)

  6. Thailand is a wonderful to spend a vacation, their language is hard to learn..whew! But I’ll try to apply it when I go there maybe this December. Well, thanks a lot! This website helps me learning Thai culture and language.

  7. Lani, I’m a hermit, remember? :-)

    (Ta for the compliments! I like the idea of this series as well. it’s practical)

  8. Carla, one thing I’ve learned about studying Thai is this: it’s a long process so as long as you don’t give up you’ll make progress. Eventually.

    Enjoy your trip to Thailand. December is a good time to visit.

  9. These are great. I thought I sort of had a grip on นี่ vs นี้ but maybe not so much. But then some of them sounded like นี้ to me (which is what I would expect in the below sample for example). Am I mis-hearing? Can you say a little bit on นี่ vs นี้ ?

    Sample: The jacket must be dry-cleaned.
    เสื้อกันหนาว นี่ ต้อง ซักแห้ง
    sêua-gan-năao nêe [sounds like nee(high) to me] dtông sák-hâeng

  10. Hi Cath, how to learn thai language more fun and effective? I want to give up to learn this, because it’s hard and totally not familiar for me (dialect, etc). When I visit Bangkok last year with my husband, we are in trouble because their english not so good. I think we must start to learn thai-language, even just a little.. Btw, thanks for providing this course, you are great!

  11. Hi Sheryl. Being able to give clear instructions in Thai will take away some of that stress both of you feel with your housekeeper. I’m a great one for making lists too, so perhaps try that if you don’t feel that your Thai is up to it?

    You are welcome :-) more on the way…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

*