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Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy Six: Learn and Love the Thai Language

รู้รักภาษาไทย: Cat Cartoons…

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

ผู้บรรยาย: ตอน คน – ศพ
Narrator: Episode – ‘Kon’ – ‘Sop’.

นักอ่านข่าว: เกิดเหตุรถสิบล้อชนกับรถทัวร์ มีคนเจ็บห้าคน คนตายสิบศพ เจ้าหน้าที่เก็บศพไปแล้วหกศพ
Newsreader: There was a vehicle accident involving a ten-wheeler and a coach (bus). ‘Mee kon jep haa kon’, ‘kon dtaai sip sop’. (Five people were injured and ten died) ‘Jao naa-tee gep sop bpai laew hok sop’. (Six bodies were recovered at the scene of the accident)

วิเชียรมาศ: น่าสงสารจัง เอ๊ะ ทำไมคนเจ็บเป็น คน แต่คนตายเป็น ศพ ล่ะ
Wi-chian maat: How unfortunate! But hold on a minute! Why was the classifier ‘Kon’ used with ‘Kon jep’, but the classifier ‘Sop’ was used with ‘Kon dtaai’?

สีสวาด: ไม่ว่าคนเจ็บหรือคนตายก็เป็นคนเหมือนกัน ที่ถูกต้องใช้ลักษณนามว่า คน ทั้งสองคำ
Si Sawat: Whether it’s ‘Kon jep’ or ‘Kon dtaai’, they’re both ‘Kon’ all the same. So the correct classifier that should be used with both of them, is ‘Kon’.

วิเชียรมาศ: แล้วทำไมเค้า(เขา)ใช้ลักษณนามว่า ศพ กับคนตายล่ะ
Wi-chian maat: So why was the classifier ‘Sop’ used with ‘Kon Dtaai’?

สีสวาด: เค้า(เขา)ใช้ผิดน่ะซิ(สิ) เพราะเค้า(เขา)คิดเลยไปว่า เมื่อตายแล้วก็กลายเป็นศพน่ะซิ(สิ) เลยใช้เร็วไปหน่อย
Si Sawat: The newsreader has obviously used it wrongly. The newsreader must have obviously equated ‘Kon dtaai’ to ‘Sop’, which is a tad early.

ผู้บรรยาย: คน ใช้ลักษณนามว่า คน ไม่ว่าจะเป็นคนเจ็บหรือคนตาย ส่วน ศพ เป็นลักษณนามของศพ
Narrator: The classifier ‘Kon’ is used with ‘Kon’, whether it be ‘Kon jep’ or ‘Kon dtaai’. ‘Sop’, on the other hand, is the classifier for ‘Sop’.

แมวทั้งสามตัว: แล้วพบกันใหม่นะครับบบ (ครับ)
All Three Cats: See you again next time!

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

Comments…

Translating Thai into English is really tricky. Too literal a translation and whilst it may appear that a translated sentence has maintained the structure and flow of the original sentence, it ends up sounding like pidgin English (and sometimes quite a bit of the intended meaning and/or subtle nuances is lost in translation as well). Exercise too many liberties so as to get natural sounding English sentences that most closely reproduces the intended meaning and/or nuances, and the translation runs the risk of being considered a bad one because obviously at first glance, the English sentence would not look anything like the original Thai sentence in form and/or structure.

So it is that many liberties have been exercised in the translation of this episode because of the subject matter dealt with herein.

PDF Downloads…

Below is a pdf download (created by Catherine) to help with your studies. It has Thai script, transliteration, and English.

Download: Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy Six: Conversation

The Cat Cartoon Series…

Original transcript and translation provided by Sean Harley. Transliterations via T2E (thai2english.com).

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Review: 6000 Thai Words – Seriously Addictive iOS + Android + Windows 10 Apps

FunEasyLearn

6000 Words: Learn the Thai Language for FREE…

If your motivation to study Thai is wavering, you really should try FunEasyLearn – it’s a seriously addictive smartphone app! It’s free (except for removing ads – up to you) so all you have to lose is your time.

But before you start wading through this lengthy review … if Thai-English vrs English-Thai vocabulary lists matters to you, go no further. The vocabulary in this app comes from an English database so there’s a chunk of Thai specific vocabulary missing.

So sure, you won’t come across vocabulary for coke in a bag, sticky rice with mango, tuk-tuks, sanuk, etc.

BUT! There is a LOT of vocabulary! If I could learn how to spell a chunk of the 6000 words in this app I’d be chuffed to bits. Seriously. My spelling is sucky.

A quick tutorial from FunEasyLearn…

They do have a video (below) plus an animated walk-through inside the app but I wanted more so contacted the gang at FunEasyLearn for tips:

Our apps help you to learn most common words and phrases. These words and phrases are useful when travelling, meeting new people, developing life-long friendships or simply in any daily conversation.

Easy Steps to Use our App:

  1. When you run the app you can find three rows: Topic, Subtopic and Game.
  2. Just choose the Topic you want to learn first (for example Topic: Shopping).
  3. Then choose Subtopic (for example Subtopic: supermarket).
  4. After this choose the game you want to play (we recommend to start with Vocabulary game).
  5. Tap “Play” button and that’s it!

Besides the fact that you learn many useful words and phrases, these games help you to improve your writing, reading and pronunciation.

Tips for you:

  1. Spin Categories – allows the app to choose a random topic, subtopic and game for you.
  2. Review Manager – helps you to review your wrong answers, right answers, or even all the phrases.
  3. Favourite words or phrases – permits you to choose your difficult words/phrases, set as favourite and revise them later. After you selected your favorite words/phrases just go to Main Menu, choose Review words/phrases and tap Review Words/Favorite Phrases button.

TIP: When going to the next level (say, from beginner to intermediate), to see the new vocabulary, under ‘Level’ in xxx, make sure ‘Learn words from previous level’ is turned off.

Now that you’ve read the quick explanation and watched the video, I have two suggestions: Either 1) Go have fun with the app, or 2) keep reading for a detailed overview.

Walk-through of the Beginner level: 1000 Words…

This is quite a big app so I mapped it out with only the Beginner’s level turned on. There are three levels (Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced) and they all suck into the Topics shown here – keeping to one level to start helped to make it manageable.

The top nav…

FunEasyLearn

On the main screen there are three icons across the top: 1) Manage App, 2) Search bar, and 3) to the far right, a Flower.

Manage App (circle icon):

FunEasyLearn

  1. Level: Select level (beginner-intermediate-advanced), turn on/off learn words from previous levels, turn on/off Thai script.
  2. Statistics: Scores, overall stats, current streak, streak targets, levels completed, words reviewed, your skills, learned word target.
  3. Store: This is where you can get more levels by paying to get rid of ads. Beginner is £2.99 and Intermediate £8.99. Via the mysterious Flowers section I received 60% off the Advanced level.
  4. Restore purchases: Just as it says.
  5. Support: FAQs and making contact (plus reporting any mistakes you find).
  6. Settings: Native language, sounds, reset tutorials (the animated walk through), one word a day notification (haven’t figured it out yet), review word notification (haven’t figured it out yet).
  7. App: Rate the app, more apps, about this app. Icons across the bottom go to Facebook, twitter, Google+, and YouTube.

Search (search bar):

FunEasyLearnI love this search. It’s beautifully designed (as is the entire app). When you click on the search bar (without typing in anything) the vocabulary for the Topic you are studying appears. Scroll up and down to see all of the vocabulary for the different Subtopics under Topic. At the end of each Subtopic you’ll see how many words for that Subtopic are in other levels.

Each word first shows the English and the Thai script, with a Favourites star on the right (to put the word into a Favourites list). The three bars denote which level the word comes from (Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced).

Click inside a box and it expands while saying the word using a real Thai voice, not machine generated (T2S). The transliteration now appears below the Thai.

At the bottom of the expanded box are three icons: 1) audio (repeats the word), 2) book (takes you to the word’s dedicated Vocabulary page – clicking the left arrow takes you back), and 3) the Favourites star again.

Flowers (flower icon): As you play the game, you earn flowers that you can then redeem inside the app. Flowers are what makes the app free. Earn flowers, get new levels for free. I was only on the app a short while when I was offered 60% off the Advanced course so it’s worth paying attention to.

The main guts of the app…

FunEasyLearnAs mentioned in FunEasyLearn’s tutorial above, the app operates around three main nav sections: 1) Topic, 2) Subtopic, and 3) Games.

In the graphic to the right the selected Topic is People, the Subtopic is Body, and the Game is Vocabulary.

To work the app you slide each nav section to the left or right to line up different choices. When working your way through a section, reaching the end automatically moves you to the next one.

Tip 1: As you go through the app don’t think of it as linear. Think of it as peeling an apple all in one go. You start at the top (People), with each section leading you into the next, and the next, and the next, until you reach the bottom, the end of the course. But that’s only if you follow a set route – you can also wiz around willy-nilly. I started by bouncing all over the place but got dizzy so went in search of a logical way to attack the app.

Tip 2:Also important to know is that clicking on a Topic/Subtopic/Game running down the middle either selects or deselects that item. Just remember that you need to have one from each section selected (Topic/Subtopic/Game) before the bottom arrow allows you to play a game. If three are not selected and you double click on the arrow, it will select for you. Surprise!

So now, on to the guts of the app…

As per my confession, when I first started playing with the app I was twirling all over the place so I backed off, started from the beginning, and then worked my way to the end, taking notes as I went. And that’s what you’ll read below.

1) Topic (top nav slider): People, Appearance, Health, Home, Services, Shopping, Food, Eating out, Study, Work, Transport, Sport, Leisure, Environment, Reference, Review words.

2) Subtopic (middle nav slider): Each of the top nav subjects (shown above) break down into mini-subjects (Subtopics) within the middle nav. Tip: The course starts with People but when you open the app most any Topic could be in place.

Subtopic – People: Body, Face, Hand, Foot, Muscles, Skeleton, Internal organs, Family, Relationships, Emotions, Life events, People review favourites, People review wrong, Review. Then >> Children’s clothing, and the Subtopic bounces to the next in line, Appearance…

Subtopic – Appearance: Children’s clothing, Men’s clothing, Women’s clothing, Accessories, Hair, Beauty, Appearance Review Favourite, Appearance Review Wrong, Review appearance. Then it goes into >> Illness…

Subtopic – Health: Illness, Doctor, Injury, First aid, Hospital, Dentist, Optician, Alternative therapy, Health Review Favourite, Health Review Wrong, Review Health, and then >> House…

Subtopic – Home: House, Internal systems, Living room, Dining room, Kitchen, Kitchenware, Bedroom, Bathroom, Nursery, Utility room, Workshop, Toolbox, Decorating, Garden, Garden plants, Garden tools, Gardening, House Review Favourite, House Review Wrong, Review Home >> Emergency services…

Subtopic – Services: Emergency services, Communications, Hotel, Services Review Favourite, Service Review Wrong, Review Services >> Shopping centre…

Subtopic – Shopping: Shopping centre, Supermarket, Chemist, Florist, Newsagent, Confectioner, Other shops, Shopping Review Favourite, Shopping Review Wrong, Review Shopping >> Meat…

Subtopic – Food: Meat, Fish, Vegetables, Fruit, Grains and pulses, Herbs and spices, Bottled foods, Dairy products, Breads and flours, Cakes and desserts, Delicacies, Drinks, Food Review Favourite, Food Review Wrong, Review Food >> Cafe…

Subtopic – Eating out: Cafe, Bar, Restaurant, Fast food, Breakfast, Dinner, Eating out Review Favourite, Eating out Review Wrong, Review Eating out >> School…

Subtopic – Study: School, Maths, Science, College, Study Review Favourite, Study Review Wrong, Review Study >> Office…

Subtopic – Work: Office, Computer, Media, Law, Farm, Construction, Professions, Work Review Favourite, Work Review Wrong, Review Work >> Roads…

Subtopic – Transport: Roads, Bus, Car, Motorbike, Bicycle, Train, Aircraft, Airport, Ship, Port, Transport Review Favourite, Transport Review Wrong, Review Transport >> American football…

Subtopic – Sport: American football, Rugby, Soccer, Hockey, Cricket, Basketball, Baseball, Tennis, Golf, Athletics, Combat sports, Swimming, Sailing, Horse riding, Fishing, Skiing, Other sports, Fitness, Sport Review Favourite, Sport Review Wrong, Review Sport >> Theatre…

Subtopic – Leisure: Theatre, Orchestra, Concert, Sightseeing, Outdoor activities, Beach, Camping, Home entertainment, Photography, Games, Arts and crafts, Leisure Review Favourite, Leisure Review Wrong, Review Leisure >> Space…

Subtopic – Environment: Space, Earth, Landscape, Weather, Rocks, Minerals, Animals, Plants, Town, Architecture, Environment Review Favourite, Environment Review Wrong, Review Environment >> Time…

Subtopic – Reference: Time, Calendar, Numbers, Weights and measures, World map, North and central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Asia and Oceania >> Reference Review Favourite, Reference Review Wrong, Review Reference >> Review All Wrong Answers…

Subtopic – Review words: Review All Wrong Answers, Review All words, Review All Right Answers, Review All Favourite Words >> Body… (where it goes back to the beginning which is People). Tip: If you only have a few words to review it will pull from the general list (words you might not have seen).

3) Games (bottom slider nav): Vocabulary, Choose word, Find image, Match words, Listen and choose, Write word, Listen and write.

FunEasyLearn

Games – Vocabulary (book icon): This section introduces each word with Thai script, transliteration, a graphic, and audio recorded by real people. Here you study the information, record your voice to see how close you can get to the Thai (it’s great – the app converts your voice into Thai script), create favourites, then move onto the next word.

There’s no way to turn off transliteration but it doesn’t last for long (unless you’ve selected the ‘transliteration only’ option via the settings). Vocabulary is the only game where you can click the star icon on the top right to make the word a favourite (otherwise use the dictionary search). The arrow on the top left takes you back to the main screen. The thick arrow on the right auto scrolls the screens. Turn off auto scrolling by clicking on the || icon that replaces the right arrow. Across the bottom left of the screen there are two audio controls. One repeats at a normal speed and the other at a slower speed. The icon to the right records your voice (you first need to let the app access your microphone). Speak into your phone and a Thai translation in Thai script appears. It’s pretty nifty for getting your pronunciation right, as well as enforcing spelling.

Games – Choose word (finger icon): This is a Thai script reading exercise with audio. There’s a single graphic across the top with the English word below. The two boxes across the bottom each have a word in Thai (default setting is script, no transliteration). If you select the correct Thai word the box turns green, the word is spoken, and you advance to the next selection. Select the wrong word and the box turns red with an X on it. You must select the right word to advance. There are no cheats (more about those below).

Games – Find Image (magnifying glass icon): This is a Thai script reading exercise with audio. There are four boxes, each with a word in English. Along the bottom there’s a Thai word in Thai script (no transliteration unless you’ve changed it in the settings). You need to select the correct word in English. If you select the right word, it’s spoken, the square goes green and then it flips to the correct graphic. If you get it wrong you get a box with a red X inside. You must get a correct answer before moving on.

Games – Match words (scale icon): This is a Thai script reading exercise but sans audio. There are two rows of boxes: the row on the left has Thai script (unless you’re studying with transliteration) and the row on the right has English. Click one of each to match the boxes. Get it correct and the two boxes go green and disappear. Get it wrong and the two boxes turn red and then back to white. There is a cheat: Click the ? symbol in the lower right corner and it’ll match boxes for you.

Games – Listen and choose (earphones icon): This is a listening exercise. On the screen are four squares with graphics inside. You have to match a graphic with the audio that you hear as soon as four boxes appear. Get it right and the box goes green and you advance to the next screen. Get it wrong and the box goes red with an X in the middle. There are two sound icons on the bottom left. One replays the audio at a normal rate and the other at a slower rate. The icon to the right is cheat for those in a Thai script setting; clicking the icon gives you Thai transliteration.

Games – Write word (paper/pencil icon): This is a spelling exercise. There’s a single graphic with word under it in English. Under that is a partially filled in word (unless it’s a two letter word), with dashes denoting missing letters. Below are boxes with a choice of letters in Thai script (unless you’ve chosen transliteration). You need to click the boxes to fill in what’s missing. When you get it right you’ll hear the word spoken and then move onto the next. There is a cheat: Clicking on the ? symbol fills in the missing items one by one.

Games – Listen and write (radio icon): This is a listening, spelling exercise. Similar to Write word, there’s a single graphic but in this one there’s no English. Instead of words, the audio plays automatically with dashes showing how many spaces you need to fill in. All of the letters are missing. Below are boxes with Thai script (unless of course, you are using transliteration). Click on boxes to fill in the spaces. To the left is an audio icon to hear the word once more. Again, the cheat is the ? symbol.

FunEasyLearnBasic navigation inside each game: When you start playing a game, across the top there’s an arrow on the left that takes you back to the home screen (logical). There’s also a round icon on the right that tells your game progress, game score, and what Topic and Subtopic you are in. Depending on the game, across the bottom the icons change.

FunEasyLearn

Game Wheel: You only get the screen that has all of the game icons (shown above) when you’ve completed a game. The circular icon with the arrow on the end replaces the icon of the game you just completed – click to repeat the game. The home icon takes you back to the main screen. The centre icon takes you to the next game on the list.

Here’s a breakdown of the icons: Vocabulary (book icon), Choose word (finger icon), Find image (magnifying glass icon), Match words (scale icon), Listen and choose (earphones icon), Write word (paper/pencil icon), Listen and write (radio icon).

Learn 6000 Thai Words on iOS, Android and Windows 10…

This app has it all. Listening, reading, writing and spelling.

And if you haven’t figured it out (and before I forget to mention) this app is brilliant for those who can read Thai or are learning how to read Thai and want improve their spelling using Thai script. I haven’t seen anything like it.

If you are using transliteration (only) the spelling sections (Write word and Listen and write) might need a miss but the rest should keep you hopping. Let me know how you get on?

Here’s the app on iTunes and Google Play:

iOS: 6000 Words – Learn Thai Language for Free
Android: 6000 Words – Learn Thai Language for Free
Windows 10 (mobile, tablet, PC): 6000 Words – Learn Thai Language for Free

Eventually I’ll make my way over to the phrase version of the app. Love it.

iOS: 5000 Phrases – Learn Thai Language for Free
Android: 5000 Phrases – Learn Thai Language for Free

EDIT: You can report mistakes from inside the app (Manage App >> support >> contact us) or send them to support@funeasylearn.com

Here’s FunEasyLearn around and about:

Twitter: @FunEasyLearn
Facebook: Fun Easy Learn
YouTube: Fun Easy Learn
Website: FunEasyLearn

There’s still more I need to figure out but I can promise you that eventually, I’ll get to the bottom of the app. But, instead of delving further, I’m going to get back to having fun getting my spelling up to speed. If I find anything new I’ll add it to this review. If you find anything, please let me know either by leaving comments below or via my contact form.

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Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy Five: Learn and Love the Thai Language

รู้รักภาษาไทย: Cat Cartoons…

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

ผู้บรรยาย: ตอน ขี้แพ้ชวนตี
Narrator: Episode – ‘Kee pae chuan dtee’.

เก้าแต้ม: มาวิ่งแข่งกันมั๊ย(ไหม)ล่า(ล่ะ)
Kao Taem: Want to have a running race?

วิเชียรมาศ: เอาซี่(สิ) ใครชนะได้กินปลาก่อนนะ
Wi-chian maat: You’re on! Whoever wins gets to eat the fish first, OK?

เก้าแต้ม: เธอเอาเปรียบชั้น(ฉัน)นี่ ออกวิ่งก่อนชั้น(ฉัน)อีก
Kao Taem: You took unfair advantage of me. You started running before I did.

วิเชียรมาศ: อะไร ก็ต้องออกวิ่งพร้อม ๆ กันไม่ใช่หรอ(หรือ)
Wi-chian maat: Whaaat? We were supposed to start running at the same time. Did we not do that?

เก้าแต้ม: ไม่รู้หล่ะ ชั้น(ฉัน)ไม่ยอมอ่ะ เธอขี้โกงชั้น(ฉัน)
Kao Taem: Whatever! This is unacceptable (to me). You cheated (me out of a victory).

สีสวาด: เก้าแต้มนี่แย่จัง แพ้แล้วไม่ยอมแพ้ หยั่งเงี้ย(อย่างนี้)เค้า(เขา)เรียกว่า ขี้แพ้ชวนตี
Si Sawat: Kao Taem, you’re horrible! You’ve lost and you won’t accept that you’ve lost. People call this ‘Kee pae chuan dtee’.

ผู้บรรยาย: ขี้แพ้ชวนตี เป็นสำนวน หมายถึงผู้ที่แข่งขันแล้วแพ้ตามกติกา แต่ไม่ยอมรับว่าฝ่ายของตัวเองนั้นแพ้ นอกจากนี้ยังหมายถึง แพ้แล้วพาล อีกด้วย
Narrator: ‘Kee pae chuan dtee’ is a saying that means a person who has played and lost in accordance with the rules, but does not accept that he / she is the one who lost. Apart from this, it also means that after a person loses, he / she tries to pick a quarrel or fight (with the victor).

แมวทั้งสามตัว: แล้วพบกันใหม่นะครับบบ (ครับ)
All Three Cats: See you again next time!

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

Comments…

The closest English equivalent for ‘Kee pae chuan dtee’ would probably be ‘sore loser’.

PDF Downloads…

Below is a pdf download (created by Catherine) to help with your studies. It has Thai script, transliteration, and English.

Download: Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy Five: Conversation

The Cat Cartoon Series…

Original transcript and translation provided by Sean Harley. Transliterations via T2E (thai2english.com).

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Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy Four: Learn and Love the Thai Language

รู้รักภาษาไทย: Cat Cartoons…

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

ผู้บรรยาย: ตอน ลักษณนามของขลุ่ย
Narrator: Episode – The Classifier for ‘Klui’.

วิเชียรมาศ: เสียงขลุ่ยเพราะจังน้า(นะ)
Wi-chian maat: The sound of the ‘Klui” is so melodious, don’t you agree?!

สีสวาด: พ่อพี่เก่งเป่าขลุ่ยเก่งมาก
Si Sawat: Pee Geng’s dad is highly skilled in playing (blowing) the ‘Klui’.

เก้าแต้ม: ที่บ้านชั้น(ฉัน)ก็มีขลุ่ยอยู่อันนึง(หนึ่ง)นะ
Kao Taem: There’s ‘Klui’ one ‘an’ in my home, you know?!

สีสวาด: ขลุ่ยหนึ่งเลาจ้ะ ไม่ใช่ขลุ่ยหนึ่งอัน
Si Sawat: It’s “‘Klui’ one ‘lao’”, not “‘Klui’ one ‘an’”.

เก้าแต้ม: ผิดอีกแล้วเรา เอ่อๆ ขลุ่ยหนึ่งเลา
Kao Taem: I’ve made a mistake yet again. All right, all right, ‘Klui’ one ‘lao’.

ผู้บรรยาย: ลักษณนามของขลุ่ยและปี่ของไทย
คือ เลา ไม่ใช่ อัน
Narrator: The classifier for ‘Klui’ and Thai ‘Bpee’, is ‘Lao’, not ‘An’.

แมวทั้งสามตัว: แล้วพบกันใหม่นะครับบบ (ครับ)
All Three Cats: See you again next time!

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

Comments…

‘Klui’ (ขลุ่ย) and Thai ‘Bpee’ (ปี่ไทย) are two different types of Thai wind instruments (see Thai instruments).

PDF Downloads…

Below is a pdf download (created by Catherine) to help with your studies. It has Thai script, transliteration, and English.

Download: Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy Four: Conversation

The Cat Cartoon Series…

Original transcript and translation provided by Sean Harley. Transliterations via T2E (thai2english.com).

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Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy Three: Learn and Love the Thai Language

รู้รักภาษาไทย: Cat Cartoons…

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

ผู้บรรยาย: ตอน ขริบ – ขลิบ
Narrator: Episode – ‘Krib’ – ‘Klib’.

ก้อย: อุ๊ย! เก้าแต้ม ซนจัง ดูซี่(สิ)ด้ายหลุดหมดแล้ว
Goi: Hey! Kao Taem! You’re so naughty! Look! The threads are all loosened.

วิเชียรมาศ: พี่ก้อยทำอะไรน่ะ
Wi-chian maat: What is Pee Goi doing?

สีสวาด: พี่ก้อยกำลังขริบชายกระโปรงออกจ้ะ
Si Sawat: Pee Goi is ‘Krib’-ing the bottom edge of her skirt.

วิเชียรมาศ: พี่ก้อยทำอะไรต่อน่ะ
Wi-chian maat: What is Pee Goi doing now?

สีสวาด: อ๋อ พี่ก้อยขลิบชายกระโปรงจ้ะ
Si Sawat: Ah! Pee Goi is ‘Klib’-ing her skirt.

เก้าแต้ม: เอ๋ ฟังคล้ายๆ กันน้า(นะ) ขิบ ขิบ
Kao Taem: Hmm, they sound almost the same. ‘Kib’. ‘Kib’.

สีสวาด: ฟังให้ดีนะจ๊ะ พี่ก้อยเอากรรไกรมาขริบชายกระโปรงออก แล้วก็เอาเศษผ้ามาขลิบหุ้มชายกระโปรง
Si Sawat: Listen carefully. Pee Goi used a pair of scissors to ‘Krib’ the bottom edge of her skirt and she is now ‘Klib’-ing the remaining part of her skirt.

ผู้บรรยาย: ขริบ เขียน ข ไข่ ร เรือ สระอิ บ ใบไม้ หมายความว่า ตัดเล็มด้วยกรรไกร ส่วน ขลิบ เขียน ข ไข่ ล ลิง สระอิ บ ใบไม้ หมายความว่า เย็บหุ้มริมผ้าเพื่อกันลุ่ยหรือเพื่อให้สวยงาม
Narrator: ‘Krib’, written ‘Kor kai’, ‘Ror reua’, ‘Sara i’ and ‘Bor bai mai’, means to use a pair of scissors to trim off a part of something whereas ‘Klib’, written ‘Kor kai’, ‘Lor ling’, ‘Sara i’ and ‘Bor bai mai’, means ‘(to) hem so as to prevent threads from loosening or for aesthetic purposes’.

แมวทั้งสามตัว: แล้วพบกันใหม่นะครับบบ (ครับ)
All Three Cats: See you again next time!

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

PDF Downloads…

Below is a pdf download (created by Catherine) to help with your studies. It has Thai script, transliteration, and English.

Download: Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy Three: Conversation

The Cat Cartoon Series…

Original transcript and translation provided by Sean Harley. Transliterations via T2E (thai2english.com).

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Thai Slang You Might Need to Know: Free Audio and Spreadsheet Downloads Included

Benjawan Poomsan Becker

Benjawan Poomsan Becker (of Paiboon Publishing fame) has a Thai and Lao Interpreters’ Study Group ล่ามไทย ນາຍພາສາລາວ on Facebook where they share tips and secrets of the trade.

While Benjawan hasn’t lived in Thailand for years she’s passionate about keeping up with new additions to the Thai language. And whenever she comes across new Thai slang, she adds it to the exceptional Talking Thai <> English Dictionary+Phrasebook.

Interpreters and translators will obviously be aware of homegrown slang but they need to have the translations at the tips of their tongues. Understanding Thai slang is also a great way for students to learn more about the language as well.

Just recently Benjawan shared her shortlist of Thai slang with the Interpreters’ Study Group.

With permission from Benjawan (thanks!) below is her list. The notes in the parenthesis are mine (not set in stone) so if you have suggestions, please, don’t be shy (contact me).

At the bottom of this post you’ll find two files to download: audio and spreadsheet (English, Thai script, and transliteration included). Of course, audio files for each of the words (recorded by Benjawan) can also be found in the dictionary. Have fun! I sure did.

กรอบ /gròp/ dirt poor
กร่อย /gròi/ boring
กระตั๊ก /grà dták/ abundant
กระต่ายตื่นตูม /grà-dtàai dtèun dtoom/ chicken little and the sky is falling (rabbit frightened of noise)
กิ๊ก /gík/ boyfriend, girlfriend, lover in a non-serious relationship
เกิด /gèrt/ have a chance to shine
แก้มือ /gâe meu/ try to do better when given a second chance (to fix a new hand)
ไก่อ่อน /gài òn/ inexperienced person (innocent chicken)
ขาประจำ /kăa bprà-jam/ regular customer
ขี้เต่า /kêe dtào/ armpit
ขี้เลื่อย /kêe lêuay/ dull minded (sawdust)
ขึ้นกล้อง /kêun glông/ photogenic (rise in the camera)
เขี้ยวลากดิน /kîeow lâak din/ tough, not easily give in (long in the fang)
ควาย /kwaai/ stupid person (buffalo)
ค่าโสหุ้ย /kâa sŏh-hûi/ overhead (cost / expense – Chinese origin?)
คุณไสย /kun-săi/ black magic
เครื่องร้อน /krêuang rón/ act immediately with enthusiasm (hot engine)
งก /ngók/ stingy
งงเต็ก /ngong dtèk/ confused
งูๆปลาๆ /ngoo ngoo bplaa bplaa/ knowing very little about something (snake snake fish fish)
จ๋อย /jŏi/ be sad and dejected (to be pale)
จับกบ /jàp gòp/ stumble and fall (to catch a frog)
จ๊าบ /jáap/ cool (Onomatopoeic word?)
จิ๊ก /jík/ steal little things (the sound of pecking something?)
เจ๊ /jáy/ older sister (Chinese word)
เจ๊ง /jéng/ going out of business (collapse)
เจ๋ง /jĕng/ cool, great!
เจาะลึก /jòr léuk/ investigate thoroughly (to drill deep)
แจ๋ว /jăew/ wonderful! (Onomatopoeic word?)
แฉ /chăe/ reveal (possibly from English ‘share’)
ชวด /chûat/ miss, lose out on (rat, animal of the Thai zodiac)
ชะนี /chá-nee/ “woman” used by gay men (gibbons sound like ผัว /pŭa/, husband)
ช้างน้ำ /cháang náam/ big, fat person (hippo)
เช้งกะเด๊ะ /cháyng gà dé/ beautiful and sexy woman (Onomatopoeic word?)
เชย /choie/ old-fashioned
เชียร์แขก /chia kàek/ try to get customers to buy (English loanword: ‘cheer’ on guests)
ซวย /suay/ unlucky
ซา /saa/ subside
ซ่า /sâa/ showy
ซิ่ง /sîng/ brave and hip in expressing oneself (shortened from ‘racing’)
เซ้ง /sáyng/ lease (Chinese origin?)
เซ็ง /seng/ dull
ดอกฟ้า /dòk fáa/ high-ranking woman of rich and powerful family (sky flower)
ดองงาน /dong ngaan/ procrastinate on one’s work (pickling the job)
ดำน้ำ /dam náam/ guess (diving without knowing what you’ll hit)
ดีแตก /dee dtàek/ turning out to be not so good (broken goodness)
ดูไม่จืด /doo mâi jèut/ not looking good (look not bland?)
เด็กกะโปโล /dèk gà-bpoh-loh/ dirty, uncivilized and innocent child (childish child)
เด็กแนว /dèk naew/ young person that follows all the new trends (stylish kids)
เดิ้น /dêrn/ stylish and modern, go-go (shortened from ‘modern’)
เดี้ยง /dîang/ dead, out of order, broken
ไดโนเสาร์ /dai-noh-săo/ old-fashioned (dinosaur, English loanword)
ตกม้าตาย /dtòk máa dtaai/ fail before reaching success (fall down from horse and die)
ตงฉิน /dtong-chĭn/ work honestly (Chinese origin?)
ต้ม /dtôm/ bamboozle, trick, deceive (to boil)
ต่อยหอย /dtòi hŏi/ very talkative (to keep punching a shell to break it)
ตัวซวย /dtua suay/ jinx (unlucky person)
ตาถั่ว /dtaa tùa/ be careless (peanut eyes)
ติ๊งต๊อง /dtíng-dtóng/ wacky (Onomatopoeic word?)
ติดดิน /dtìt din/ down-to-earth, earthy (to stick to the ground)
ตีนแมว /dteen maew/ burglar (cat feet – cats walk softly, soundless)
เตะฝุ่น /dtè fùn/ unemployed (to kick the dust)
เต่าล้านปี /dtào láan bpee/ very old-fashioned person (million year old turtle)
แต๊ะอั๋ง /dtáe-ăng/ grope or touch sexually (Chinese origin?)
ทึ่ง /têung/ amazed (Onomatopoeic word?)
ทุเรศ /tú-râyt/ obscene, shabby (ugly)
นกเขา /nók kăo/ cock, penis (dove)
นกต่อ /nók dtòr/ informant (bird decoy)
นั่งนก /nâng nók/ sleep while sitting (sitting bird)
น้ำเน่า /nám nâo/ soap operas (drains are not filled with good water)
นิ้ง /níng/ superb (Onomatopoeic word?)
เนี้ยบ /níap/ perfect, smart
บอกผ่าน /bòk pàan/ inflate the price of something
บ๊อง บ๊องๆ /bóng · bóng bóng/ crazy (Onomatopoeic word?)
บ้าๆบอๆ /bâa bâa bor bor/ crazy (Onomatopoeic word?)
ปล่อยไก่ /bplòi gài/ embarrassed, make silly or careless mistakes (to release chickens)
ปอดแหก /bpòt hàek/ chicken-hearted (broken lungs)
ปั้นเรื่อง /bpân rêuang/ make up a story (to mold a story)
ปากหอยปากปู /bpàak hŏi bpàak bpoo/ someone who gossips and causes damage to others (shell mouth, crab mouth)
ปิ๊ง /bpíng/ click – between lovers (Onomatopoeic word?)
แป๊บ /bpáep/ one little moment (Onomatopoeic word?)
ผีเสื้อสมุทร /pĕe sêua sà-mùt/ big ugly woman (character from Thai literature)
เผา /păo/ gossip about, talk behind one’s back (to burn someone)
ฝรั่งจ๋า /fà-ràng jăa/ Western idolizer
ฝอย /fŏi/ chat, brag
เพื่อนซี้ /pêuan sée/ very close friend
แพะรับบาป /páe ráp bàap/ scapegoat (goat sin)
ภาษาดอกไม้ /paa-săa dòk máai/ language of love (flower language)
ม้ามืด /máa mêut/ dark horse (unexpected winner)
มีกะตังค์ /mee gà dtang/ rich (to have coins – gà dtang comes from satang สตางค์ which means coins/money)
มือขึ้น /meu kêun/ having good luck (hand up)
มือตก /meu dtòk/ having bad luck (hand down)
เมาท์ /mao/ speak with friends for fun, chat (shortened from ‘mouth’)
แมงดา /maeng-daa/ pimp (insect, giant waterbug)
ไม่ใจ /mâi jai/ coward (no heart)
ไม่เป็นสับปะรด /mâi bpen sàp-bpà-rót/ bad tasting or low quality (not a pineapple)
ยาบ้า /yaa bâa/ methamphetamine, meth, amphetamine, speed (crazy medicine)
ร้อนตับแตก /rón dtàp dtàek/ darn hot (row of dried nipa palm leaves used as a roof – doesn’t break but feels like it)
รู้อย่างเป็ด /róo yàang bpèt/ jack of all trades, master of none (to know like a duck)
เรื่องขี้ผง /rêuang kêe pŏng/ easy matter or trivial (story dust)
ลองของ /long kŏng/ try something usually bad
ลักไก่ /lák gài/ cheat in a game (to steal a chicken)
ลูกมือ /lôok meu/ helper or assistant (small hand)
วาบหวาม /wâap wăam/ provoking sensation or sexually explicit (Onomatopoeic word?)
เวอร์ /wer/ too much (shortened from ‘over’).
สวิงเด้ง /sà-wĭng dâyng/ scream with excitement
สะเออะ /sà-ùh/ meddle
สันดาน /săn daan/ trait
ไส้แห้ง /sâi hâeng/ destitute (dry intestines – to be starving)
หน้าโหล /nâa lŏh/ common looking face (a dozen faces – everything the same)
หมดตูด /mòt dtòot/ dead broke (finished pooping)
หมวย /mŭay/ young Chinese woman (Chinese origin?)
หมาวัด /măa wát/ poor man (temple dog)
หมาหมู่ /măa mòo/ group of dangerous men (a group of dogs)
หมู /mŏo/ easy (pig)
หยวน /yŭan/ give in reluctantly
หลุดโลก /lùt lôhk/ eccentric or quirky (out of this world)
หวย /hŭay/ lottery, lotto
ห่วย /hùay/ bad, no good
ห่วยแตก /hùay dtàek/ crap! (bad broken)
ห้องกง /hông gong/ jail (cell room – hông gong rhymes with Hong Kong)
หายต๋อม /hăai-dtŏm/ disappear for a long time (disappear + the sound of throwing something into the water)
แห้ว /hâew/ lose one’s opportunity, to blow it (chestnut)
เฮง /hayng/ fortunate, lucky (Chinese origin?)
เฮี้ยน /hían/ manifesting the power of an evil spirit
ไฮโซ /hai soh/ high-class (shortened from ‘high society’)


Speak Like a Thai 1&2…

Many of the words (with phrases) in this list can be found in Benjawan’s Speak Like a Thai series.

Speak Like a Thai Volume 1
Speak Like a Thai Volume 2

Smartphone Apps: Talking Thai <> English Dictionary+Phrasebook…

There is no better Thai dictionary with audio and phrases than the Talking Thai-Eng-Thai Dictionary by Paiboon Publishing and Word in the Hand. It’s an amazing resource that keeps on getting better. Most of the slang used in this post will be in the dictionary.

iOS app: Talking Thai <> English Dictionary+Phrasebook
Android: Talking Thai <> English Dictionary+Phrasebook

Thai slang download files…

Spreadsheet Download (zip): Thai Slang To know – 498kb
Spreadsheet Download (pdf): Thai Slang To know – 80kb
Audio Download (zip): Thai Slang To know – 1.9mg zip

Note: These files are for personal use only (please do not place them on other websites).

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Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy Two: Learn and Love the Thai Language

รู้รักภาษาไทย: Cat Cartoons…

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

ผู้บรรยาย: ตอน ขนทรายเข้าวัด
Narrator: Episode – Bringing sand to the ‘Wat’.

วิเชียรมาศ: ดูเก้าแต้มสิ ซนจริงๆ
Wi-chian maat: Look at Kao Taem! He’s so naughty!

สีสวาด: เก้าแต้ม ไปตะกุยทราย คนเค้า(เขา)อุตส่าห์ขนเข้ามา
Si Sawat: Kao Taem! Why are you digging up the sand that people have gone through all the trouble to bring in?!

วิเชียรมาศ: คนเค้า(เขา)ขนทรายเข้าวัดกันทำไมน่ะ
Wi-chian maat: Why do people bring sand into the ‘Wat’?

สีสวาด: เค้า(เขา)เอามาก่อเจดีย์ เพื่อนำทรายไปใช้ประโยชน์ในวัดไง คนสมัยก่อนเชื่อว่า เมื่อเราเดินย่ำในวัดไปมาจนทรายติดเท้าออกไปนอกวัด หากมีโอกาสก็ต้องขนทรายมาคืนให้วัด
Si Sawat: Well, they bring in the sand to build stupas, for use in a beneficial way in the ‘Wat’. People in the olden days believed that when we walk and tramp through the ‘Wat’ as we enter and leave it, sand that sticks to our feet is taken out of the ‘Wat’. So if the opportunity arises, we must bring back sand to the ‘Wat’.

ผู้บรรยาย: ขนทรายเข้าวัด เป็นการทำกุศลโดยการนำทรายไปให้วัดเพื่อใช้ประโยชน์ในวัด
Narrator: Bringing sand to the ‘Wat’ is a form of merit making, by bringing sand for it to be used beneficially in the ‘Wat’.

แมวทั้งสามตัว: แล้วพบกันใหม่นะครับบบ (ครับ)
All Three Cats: See you again next time!

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

Comments…

Building sand stupas is one of various traditional activities for Songkran. See the explanation at thaibuddhist.com.

PDF Downloads…

Below is a pdf download (created by Catherine) to help with your studies. It has Thai script, transliteration, and English.

Download: Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy Two: Conversation

The Cat Cartoon Series…

Original transcript and translation provided by Sean Harley. Transliterations via T2E (thai2english.com).

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Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy One: Learn and Love the Thai Language

รู้รักภาษาไทย: Cat Cartoons…

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

ผู้บรรยาย: ตอนแกงบวด – บวชชี
Narrator: Episode – ‘Gaeng buat’ – ‘Buat chee’.

ก้อย: ดีจัง วันนี้มีแกงบวดด้วย อยากกินมานานแล้ว
Goi: Great! Today we’ve got ‘Gaeng buat’. I’ve been wanting to eat it for a long time now.

เก่ง: มีกล้วยบวชชีของโปรดของพี่ด้วย
Geng: There’s also ‘Gluay buat chee’, my favorite.

วิเชียรมาศ: กล้วยบวชชี แล้วแกงบวชพระด้วยรึเปล่า
Wi-chian maat: ‘Gluay buat chee’, so there’s a ‘Gaeng buat pra’ as well, right?

สีสวาด: แกงไม่ได้บวชหรอก แต่ บวด คำนี้ใช้ ด เด็ก สะกดจ้ะ
Si Sawat: The ‘Gaeng’ here does not ‘Buat’ (enter monkhood / nunhood), OK?! The word ‘Buat’ here is spelled with a ‘Dor dek’ as the final consonant.

วิเชียรมาศ: แกงบวด กับ บวชชี ต่างกันยังไง(อย่างไร)ล่ะ
Wi-chian maat: How does ‘Gaeng buat’ differ from ‘Buat chee’?

สีสวาด: แกงบวด บวด สะกดด้วย ด เด็ก ใช้เผือก มัน หรือฟักทอง ต้มกับกะทิและน้ำตาลปี๊บ ส่วน บวชชี คำว่า บวช สะกดด้วย ช ช้าง ทำด้วยกล้วยต้มกับกะทิและน้ำตาลทราย มีสีขาวเหมือนเครื่องนุ่งห่มของแม่ชี
Si Sawat: ‘Gaeng buat’, the ‘Buat’ here is spelled with a ‘Dor dek’ as the final consonant, is made by boiling taros, yams or pumpkins in coconut milk and palm sugar. As for ‘Buat chee’, the word ‘Buat’ here is spelled with a ‘Chor Chaang’ as the final consonant, is made by boiling bananas in coconut milk and cane sugar. It’s white in color, the same color as the robes worn by ‘Mae chee’-s.

วิเชียรมาศ: น่าอร่อยนะ แล้วแมวอย่างเราจะได้กินด้วยมั้ย(ไหม)เนี่ย
Wi-chian maat: They look so yummy! So will cats like us be able to eat them?

ผู้บรรยาย: แกงบวด สะกดด้วย ด เด็ก หมายถึงของหวานที่ใช้เผือก มัน หรือฟักทอง ต้มกับกะทิและน้ำตาลปี๊บ ส่วน บวชชี สะกดด้วย ช ช้าง หมายถึง ชื่อของหวานทำด้วยกล้วยต้ม กับกะทิ และน้ำตาล
Narrator: ‘Gaeng buat’, spelled with a ‘Dor dek’ as the final consonant, means a dessert made by boiling taros, yams or pumpkins in coconut milk and palm sugar. As for ‘Buat chee’, spelled with a ‘Chor Chaang’ as the final consonant: it means a dessert made by boiling bananas in coconut milk and cane sugar.

แมวทั้งสามตัว: แล้วพบกันใหม่นะครับบบ (ครับ)
All Three Cats: See you again next time!

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

Comments…

‘Mae chee’-s (แม่ชี) are Buddhist laywomen in Thailand who have dedicated their life to religion, vowing celibacy, living an ascetic life and holding eight or even ten precepts (instead of lay Buddhists’ five) (Source: wiki: Maechi). They are basically Thai nuns.

So ‘Buat chee’ (บวชชี) or ‘Gluay buat chee’ (กล้วยบวชชี) are literally ‘bananas that have entered Thai nunhood or become Thai nuns’.

PDF Downloads…

Below is a pdf download (created by Catherine) to help with your studies. It has Thai script, transliteration, and English.

Download: Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy One: Conversation

The Cat Cartoon Series…

Original transcript and translation provided by Sean Harley. Transliterations via T2E (thai2english.com).

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Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy: Learn and Love the Thai Language

รู้รักภาษาไทย: Cat Cartoons…

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

ผู้บรรยาย: ตอน การใช้ไม้ยมก
Narrator: Episode – Using ‘Maai ya-mok’.

เก้าแต้ม: ท้องฟ้าสีฟ้า ๆ
ทุ่งนาสีเขียว ๆ
ลูกงูตัวเรียว ๆ
นกเหลียวมามอง ๆ
ไก่ร้องกระต๊าก ๆ
ตัวนากแอบจ้อง ๆ
ดินทรายเป็นกอง ๆ
เดินย่อง ๆ คอยระวัง
Kao Taem: ‘Tong faa see faa faa’
‘Tung naa see kieow kieow’
‘Look ngoo dtua rieow rieow’
‘Nok lieow maa mong mong’
‘Gai rong gra-dtaak gra-dtaak’
‘Dtua naak aep jong jong’
‘Din saai bpen gong gong’
‘Dern yong yong, koi ra-wang’

วิเชียรมาศ: ท่องอะไรของเธอฟ้า ๆ เขียว ๆ จะหลับเลยหลับไม่ลงเลย
Wi-chian maat: What are you reciting? I can’t fall asleep with all this ‘Faa faa’ and ‘Kieow kieow’.

เก้าแต้ม: ไม่รู้เหมือนกัน วันก่อนเดินผ่านโรงเรียนได้ยินเด็ก ๆ เค้า(เขา)ท่องกัน เลยจำมาบ้าง
Kao Taem: I too have no idea what it is. The other day I was walking past a school and I heard the kids reciting it, so I memorized it.

สีสวาด: ก็ฟังเพลินดีนะ อะไรนะ ฟ้า ๆ เขียว ๆ เรียว ๆ มอง ๆ
Si Sawat: It can be engrossing to listen to: ‘Faa faa’, ‘Kieow kieow’, ‘Riaw riaw’, ‘Mong mong’.

วิเชียรมาศ: ทำไมต้องพูดซ้ำ ๆ กันด้วยล่ะ
Wi-chian maat: Why must everything be repeated?

สีสวาด: รู้มั้ย(ไหม)ว่าพอพูดซ้ำ ๆ แล้วความหมายมันต่างออกไป เวลาเขียนไม่ต้องเขียนซ้ำ ใช้ ไม้ยมก(ๆ) แทน
Si Sawat: Do you know that when you repeat something then its meaning changes? When you’re writing it down, there’s no need to write it twice: just use a ‘Maai ya-mok’ instead.

ผู้บรรยาย: ไม้ยมก ใช้แทนคำซ้ำ เมื่อเติมไม้ยมกเข้าไปท้ายคำ ความหมายอาจเปลี่ยนไป
Narrator: A ‘Maai ya-mok’ is used in place of a word to be written again. When a ‘Maai ya-mok’ is added at the end of a word, its meaning may change.

แมวทั้งสามตัว: แล้วพบกันใหม่นะครับบบ (ครับ)
All Three Cats: See you again next time!

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

Comments…

In linguistics, the process in which a word is repeated, is called ‘reduplication’

Reduplication in the Thai language is discussed in ‘A Reference Grammar of Thai’ by Iwasaki and Ingkaphirom.

Reduplication can basically be used to indicate plurality or to add various meanings to a word, such as softness (similar to English –ish) or intensity (for emphasis). Sometimes it is used just for the sake of rhythmic effect.

PDF Downloads…

Below is a pdf download (created by Catherine) to help with your studies. It has Thai script, transliteration, and English.

Download: Cat Cartoons Episode Seventy: Conversation

The Cat Cartoon Series…

Original transcript and translation provided by Sean Harley. Transliterations via T2E (thai2english.com).

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Cat Cartoons Episode Sixty Nine: Learn and Love the Thai Language

รู้รักภาษาไทย: Cat Cartoons…

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

ผู้บรรยาย: ตอน คำอุทานที่สื่อความหมาย
Narrator: Episode – ‘Kam u-taan’ to Show Emotion.

เก้าแต้ม: แหงวว เจ็บจังเลยอ่ะ อู๊ย ไม่น่าพลาดเลยเรา อูยย
Kao Taem: ‘Ngaeww’! It’s so painful! ‘Ui’! I really shouldn’t have slipped up like that!

วิเชียรมาศ: อ้าว เก้าแต้ม เป็นอะไรไปน่ะ ทำไมถึงเดินตัวแอ่นอย่างงี้(อย่างนี้)ล่ะ
Wi-chian maat: ‘Ao’! Kao Taem, what’s the matter? Why are you walking with your body bent like this?

เก้าแต้ม: แหม ก็เมื่อเช้านี้นะซี่(สิ) ชั้น(ฉัน)เห็นกระรอกกระโดดจากกิ่งไม้นึง(หนึ่ง)ไปกิ่งไม้อีกต้นนึง(หนึ่ง) ชั้น(ฉัน)ก็กระโดดตามแต่ไปไม่ถึงเลยตกแอ้กลงมา หูย เจ็บจัง แหงวว
Kao Taem: ‘Mae’! Well, earlier this morning, I saw a squirrel jumping from one branch to another. I jumped after it but I did not make it and fell down with a loud ‘Aek’! ‘Huy’! It really hurts! ‘Ngaeww’!

วิเชียรมาศ: เจ็บถึงกับร้องแหงวเชียวหรอ เอ แล้วถ้าคนเจ็บ เค้าจะร้องแหงวๆ เหมือนเรารึเปล่าอ่ะ
Wi-chian maat: It hurts so bad that you’re crying out ‘Ngaew’, huh?! So if a person is in pain, would that person cry out ‘Ngaew’ like us?

สีสวาด: คนน่ะเค้าไม่ร้องแหงวๆ หรอก แต่พอร้องปั๊บคนฟังจะรู้เลยว่าอยู่ในอาการอะไร ลองทายดูนะ
Si Sawat: One does not cry out ‘Ngaew’, OK?! But having said that, there are cries that as soon as you make them, the listener will know the state that you are in. Go on and make a guess.

สีสวาด: อู้ย โอ้ย
Si Sawat: ‘Uy’! ‘Oi’!

วิเชียรมาศ: หมายถึงเจ็บ
Wi-chian maat: It means that you’re in pain.

สีสวาด: เอ๊ะ เอ
Si Sawat: ‘Ay’! ‘Ay’!

วิเชียรมาศ: หมายถึงสงสัย
Wi-chian maat: It means that you’re having doubts or you’re suspicious of something.

สีสวาด: อ๋อ
Si Sawat: ‘Or’!

วิเชียรมาศ: หมายถึงเข้าใจ
Wi-chian maat: It means that you understand something.

สีสวาด: เอ้า
Si Sawat: ‘Ao’!

วิเชียรมาศ: หมายถึงให้
Wi-chian maat: It means that you are handing over something.

สีสวาด: โถ
Si Sawat: ‘Toh’!

วิเชียรมาศ: หมายถึงสงสาร
Wi-chian maat: It means that you sympathize with someone.

ผู้บรรยาย: เสียงที่เปล่งออกมาแทนความรู้สึกเรียกว่า คำอุทาน บอกอารมณ์ของผู้พูด
Narrator: The sounds made to represent emotion are called ‘Kam u-taan’, they convey the feelings of the speaker.

แมวทั้งสามตัว: แล้วพบกันใหม่นะครับบบ (ครับ)
All Three Cats: See you again next time!

เสียงเด็ก ๆ ร้องเพลง: รู้รักภาษาไทย
Sound of children singing: Learn and Love the Thai Language.

Comments…

‘Kam u-taan’ basically means ‘interjections’. The interjections of each language differ so if you want to sound like a Thai, it would be a good idea to start using Thai interjections instead of the ones that you would normally use.

PDF Downloads…

Below is a pdf download (created by Catherine) to help with your studies. It has Thai script, transliteration, and English.

Download: Cat Cartoons Episode Sixty Nine: Conversation

The Cat Cartoon Series…

Original transcript and translation provided by Sean Harley. Transliterations via T2E (thai2english.com).

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