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Thai Language Connectors: Filler Connectors

Thai Language Connectors

Filler Connectors for Thai learners…

Welcome to Filler Connectors, the third post in the Thai Language Connectors series. The previous posts in the series were: The Starter Pack (Anthony Lauder’s original 100 connectors that has a sample from each subject), and Opening Connectors (connectors that give you breathing time before answering questions).

Anthony Lauder: Filler Connectors are throw-away phrases you can insert when you need a little more thinking time. They give the illusion of deep pondering, or sharing something personal, which is exactly what you want while you think of what you are going to say next.

Notes: 1) The target audience is educated Thais (for the most part), with the materials being slightly formal in scope. And 2) an * before the phrase means there is no equivalent expression in Thai but it sounds more or less ok anyway. And 3) please don’t freak out, there’s a pdf with transliteration.

Filler Connectors for Thai learners…

It is good to know that…
ดีใจที่ได้รู้ว่า…


Well, to put it briefly…
อืม จะให้พูดสั้นๆก็คือ…


It is worth mentioning that…
อีกเรื่องหนึ่งที่บอกไว้ไม่เสียหายก็คือ…


*I think that I should point out that…
ผม/ฉันว่าผม/ฉันควรจะชี้ให้คุณเห็นว่า…


I should mention that…
แล้วผม/ฉันก็อยากบอกด้วยว่า…


Now that you mention it, I really do think that…
พอตอนนี้คุณพูดมา ผม/ฉันก็คิดจริงๆว่า…


It is remarkable that…
น่าไม่เชื่อเลยว่า…


I am amazed that…
ผม/ฉันรู้สึกทึ่งที่…


I must admit that…
ผม/ฉันต้องยอมรับว่า…


I grant that…
ผม/ฉันยอมรับว่า…


I must grant that…
ผม/ฉันต้องยอมรับว่า…


On the one hand… on the other…
แง่นึง… แต่อีกแง่นึง…


After all…
สุดท้ายแล้ว…


I should say that…
ผม/ฉันจะบอกคุณว่า…


Oddly enough…
แปลกแต่จริง…


I would like to tell you that…
ผม/ฉันอยากจะบอกคุณว่า…


I would like to know whether…
ผม/ฉันอยากรู้ว่า…


It is unbelievable how…
ไม่น่าเชื่อว่า…


*I think that I should point out to you that…
ผม/ฉันว่าผม/ฉันควรจะชี้ให้คุณเห็นว่า…


If you ask me…
ถ้าคุณถามผม/ฉัน…


I’d like to say something about…
ผม/ฉันอยากจะพูดอะไรบางอย่างเกี่ยวกับเรื่องนี้…


I’d like to say a couple of words about this…
ผม/ฉันอยากจะพูดอะไรเล็กน้อยเกี่ยวกับเรื่องนี้…


Downloads: Thai Language Filler Connectors…

Thai Language Filler Connectors (with transliteration): Pdf 328kb
Thai Language Filler Connectors (without transliteration): Pdf 328kb
Thai Language Filler Connectors: Audio (Male) 1.3mg
Thai Language Filler Connectors: Audio (Female) 1.2mg
Thai Language Filler Connectors: Audio (Female-singles) 1mg

Note: These files are for personal use only (please do not place them on other websites).

More Thai Language Connectors…

Following will be: Apologising Connectors, Qualifying Connectors, Agreeing and Disagreeing Connectors, Elaborating Connectors, Quoting Connectors, Switching Connectors, Closing Connectors and Passing Connectors (in that order).

Cheers! Catherine & Yuki

Yuki Tachaya, Web: PickupThai | YouTube: PickupThai | twitter: @PickupThai

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Thai Language Connectors: Opening Connectors

Thai Language Connectors

Opening Connectors for Thai learners…

As mentioned in the first post of the series, Thai Language Connectors: Starter Pack, Opening Connectors are responses to questions – they give you breathing time to mentally form answers.

Anthony Lauder: When you are asked a question, it can put you on the spot. Your mind can go blank, and soon you don’t know how to even start answering. Opening connectors are really useful for getting the first few words out of your mouth (“breaking the silence”) while you settle down to give the real answer to the question

Included in Anthony’s 100 Language Connectors mentioned in his Starter Pack there were four Opening Connectors: “Thank you heartily”, “That is such a good question”, “That is a difficult question”, and “Once upon a time, long ago…”. In this post we’ll complete the set from his spreadsheet.

Notes: 1) The target audience is educated Thais (for the most part), with the materials being slightly formal in scope. And 2) an * before the phrase means there is no equivalent expression in Thai but it sounds more or less ok anyway. And 3) please don’t freak out, there’s a pdf with transliteration.

Opening Connectors for Thai learners…

I must first say that…
ก่อนอื่น ผม/ฉันต้องบอกก่อนว่า…


I will be talking for about ten minutes.
ผม/ฉันจะใช้เวลาพูดประมาณสิบนาที


I’ll start with… and afterwards move on to…
ผม/ฉันจะเริ่มจาก… จากนั้นก็จะพูดถึง…


The reason why I am here is…
เหตุผลที่ผม/ฉันมาพูดให้คุณฟังวันนี้ก็คือ…

Note: Literal meaning: “The reason why I came to speak to you today is…”


Today we shall look at…
วันนี้ เราจะมาดูเรื่อง…


Today’s topic is…
หัวข้อที่เราจะคุยกันวันนี้คือ…


Today I will be talking about…
วันนี้ ผม/ฉันจะมาพูดเกี่ยวกับ…


I know that there isn’t time to spare, so I’d better make a start.
ผม/ฉันรู้ว่าเรามีเวลาไม่มาก เพราะฉะนั้นผม/ฉันขอเริ่มเลยก็แล้วกัน


I’d like to start with a general overview and after focus on…
ขอเริ่มพูดถึงภาพรวมคร่าวๆก่อนแล้วค่อยเจาะลึกรายละเอียด…

Note: Literal meaning: “Let me start with an rough overview and then, go into the details later.”


Downloads: Thai Language Opening Connectors…

Thai Language Opening Connectors (with transliteration): Pdf 395kb
Thai Language Opening Connectors (without transliteration): Pdf 395kb
Thai Language Opening Connectors: Audio (Male) 848kb
Thai Language Opening Connectors: Audio (Female) 686kb
Thai Language Opening Connectors: Audio (Female-singles) 603kb

Note: These files are for personal use only (please do not place them on other websites).

More Thai Language Connectors…

Following will be: Filler Connectors, Apologising Connectors, Qualifying Connectors, Agreeing and Disagreeing Connectors, Elaborating Connectors, Quoting Connectors, Switching Connectors, Closing Connectors and Passing Connectors (in that order).

Cheers! Catherine & Yuki

Yuki Tachaya, Web: PickupThai | YouTube: PickupThai | twitter: @PickupThai

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Thai Language Connectors: Starter Pack

Thai Language Connectors

Language Connectors for Thai learners…

Anthony Lauder (Fluent Czech on YouTube) is the Mr Rogers of language learning. In part due to his dry wit, his knowledgeable videos are a doddle to watch.

Also a fan of How to Improve Your Foreign Language Immediately, Anthony put together an invaluable list of intermediate level phrases described on his site: Conversational Intimacy Connectors and the Connectors Starter Pack.

Conversational Intimacy Connectors: Conversations need to flow. Conversational intimacy connectors help establish and maintains that relationship (so the listener feels better connected to you) as well as getting over the “urm” moments that make people uncomfortable.

When I came across Anthony’s list of connectors I just KNEW I had to have it for Thai. Problem is, not many would be capable of successfully translating the connectors from English into Thai. I’m certainly not! Actually, out of my circle of Thai speakers (native and not), only a few would feel comfortable translating at that level.

Carefully looking around (and asking opinions to be doubly sure) I approached Yuki from PickupThai. Yuki has wonderful English skills (she’s more switched on than I am and her grammar rocks). She also teaches real Thai (not Thai teacher Thai).

I can’t tell you how chuffed I was when Yuki agreed to spend the huge chunk of time needed to not only translate the entire list, but to record it as well. I owe… I owe…

Disclaimer: There are almost 500 connectors (448 at last count) that have been translated from English to Thai. And with some being difficult to translate there are sure to be a couple that people won’t 100% agree with. It’s just the way interpretation goes. So if you have differing opinions, do please let us know. We are open for consideration (but no promises).

1) The target audience is educated Thais (for the most part), with the materials being slightly formal in scope. And 2) an * before the phrase means there is no equivalent expression in Thai but it sounds more or less ok anyway. And 3) please don’t freak out, there’s a pdf with transliteration.

And now to the Thai Language Connectors Starter Pack…

Anthony’s Connectors Starter Pack has 100 connectors (a sample from each subject). And being manageable, that’s the one we’ll start with. Later posts in the series will be one subject per post.

A few tips from Anthony: I practiced these phrases dozens (maybe even hundreds) of times until I could say them automatically, without having to put any effort into thinking about them. Then I studied each one in depth, and thought hard about it to think of real-life situations when it would be used. At first, I used imaginary situations, until I felt that I associated a given connector automatically with those situations.

Connectors help smooth the way without resorting to stuttering and stumbling. Some are there to give you thinking space, so’s you can come up with something appropriate (or not) to say. For the descriptions below I’ve pared down Anthony’s, but if you need longer explanations you know where to find them.

NOTE: The audio files below are for females but the downloads are both male and female.

Opening Connectors…

Opening Connectors are responses to questions. They give you needed time to mentally form your actual answers.

Thank you heartily.
ขอบคุณจากใจ

Note: Literal meaning: “I thank you from the heart.”

That is such a good question.
นั่นเป็นคำถามที่ดี

That is a difficult question.
นั่นเป็นคำถามที่ตอบลำบาก

Once upon a time, long ago…
กาลครั้งหนึ่งนานมาแล้ว…

Note: Only used in tales and stories.

Filler Connectors…

Filler Connectors also give you time to come up with something to say (and are far better than stuttering your way to results).

*Understandably…
อย่างที่ทุกคนเข้าใจได้

Frankly speaking…
พูดตามตรงนะ…

Between you and me…
บอกแล้วอย่าไปเล่าต่อให้ใครฟังนะ ฉัน/ผม…

Anyway…
อย่างไรก็ดี…

Well then…
อืม ถ้าอย่างนั้น…

Apologising Connectors…

Mistakes in our target language are a given. I can name more than a few gaffs, and that was before I moved to Thailand! When that happens, just insert an Apologising Connector, then change the subject right quick.

Don’t be upset, but…
อย่าโกรธนะ ผม/ฉัน…

Note: “But” in this sense is not commonly used in the Thai language. You can just start saying what you need to say without saying “but.”

It was a slip of the tongue.
ผม/ฉันเผลอพูดผิดไปเท่านั้น

I said it that way by mistake.
ผม/ฉันไม่ได้ตั้งใจพูดแบบนั้น

ผม/ฉันขอโทษที่
I am sorry that…

Qualifying Connectors…

Some Qualifying Connectors soften statements, and apparently help to avoid coming off as an arrogant know-all.

To tell the truth…
เอาจริงๆแล้ว…

I presume that…
ผม/ฉันเดาว่า…

I hope that…
ผม/ฉันหวังว่า…

In my opinion…
ตามความคิดผม/ฉัน…

If that is true…
ถ้าเป็นเรื่องจริง…

Agreeing and Disagreeing Connectors…

The Agreeing and Disagreeing Connectors take you beyond the often erroneous ใช่ /châi/ and ไม่ใช่ /mâi châi/ (yes/no) answers beginners respond with.

One hundred percent.
แน่นอน(ร้อยเปอร์เซนต์)

Without question.
แน่นอน

Exactly / Exactly right.
นั่นแหละ / ใช่เลย

Most certainly.
ถูกที่สุด

Without a doubt.
อย่างไม่ต้องสงสัย

Elaborating Connectors…

Elaborating Connectors work similar to the Agreeing and Disagreeing Connectors in that they expand short replies.

*To be more precise…
ถ้าจะให้พูดแบบเฉพาะเจาะจงก็คือ…

And what’s more…
แล้วอะไรอีก…

*While I am already talking about it…
ขณะที่ผม/ฉันกำลังพูดเรื่องนี้…

I would like to emphasise that…
ผม/ฉันขอเน้นว่า…

Should I explain in greater detail?
ให้ผม/ฉันอธิบายให้ฟังละเอียดกว่านี้ไหม

Quoting Connectors…

Quoting Connectors are there to feed our gossip gene. I’m kidding. But I’m sure you know what I mean.

She said something like…
เขาพูดอะไรประมาณว่า…

Recently, I heard that…
เมื่อไม่นานมานี้ ผม/ฉันได้ยินมาว่า…

Switching Connectors…

Switching Connectors are wonderful because you can use them to change subjects to ones you have enough vocabulary for.

*Now it occurs to me that…
ตอนนี้ผม/ฉันนึกได้ว่า…

By the way…
อย่างไรก็ดี…

I have an interesting story about it.
ผม/ฉันมีเรื่องราวที่น่าสนใจ(มาเล่าให้ฟัง)เกี่ยวกับเรื่องนี้

And besides that…
นอกจากนั้น …

Oh, I nearly forgot…
โอ้ ผม/ฉันเกือบลืมไป…

Closing Connectors…

Closing Connectors are just that – phrases to help you close out a conversation.

That is all there is to say (with that, that is everything said).
นอกจากนั้น ผม/ฉันก็ไม่มีอะไรจะพูดแล้ว

That is all for now.
วันนี้เท่านี้ก่อนแล้วกัน

Note: Literal meaning: “That’s all for today.”

To sum up.
ขอสรุปที่พูดมาทั้งหมด

Note: Literal meaning: “Let me summarize everything I’ve said.”

*And there (in that) is the problem.
นั่นไงปัญหามาแล้ว

Note: Literal meaning: “And there comes a problem.” A response used after someone says something that you think is or will be a problem. Note that it’s not very common.

I hope it is only a question of time.
ผม/ฉันหวังว่าจะเป็นเรื่องของเวลา

Passing Connectors…

This is another Connector I’m sure you’ll use often. When your head is threatening to explode from speaking in a foreign language, or you just want to give someone else a chance to share their views, use Passing Connectors.

Can you tell me please…
คุณบอกผม/ฉันได้ไหมว่า…

*Would you be interested in us talking about something else?
คุณอยากให้เราพูดถึงเรื่องอื่นไหม

And what do you think?
แล้วคุณคิดว่ายังไง

Downloads: Thai Language Connectors Starter Pack…

Files updated: 27/3/15

Thai Language Connectors Starter Pack (with transliteration): Pdf 395kb
Thai Language Connectors Starter Pack (without transliteration): Pdf 395kb
Thai Language Connectors Starter Pack: Audio (Male) 4.9mg
Thai Language Connectors Starter Pack: Audio (Female) 4.8mg
Thai Language Connectors Starter Pack: Audio (Female-singles) 4.1mg

Note: These files are for personal use only (please do not place them on other websites).

More Thai Language Connectors…

Coming up in this series will be the rest of: Opening Connectors, Filler Connectors, Apologising Connectors, Qualifying Connectors, Agreeing and Disagreeing Connectors, Elaborating Connectors, Quoting Connectors, Switching Connectors, Closing Connectors and Passing Connectors (in that order).

Cheers! Catherine & Yuki

Yuki Tachaya, Web: PickupThai | YouTube: PickupThai | twitter: @PickupThai

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PickUpThai: Colloquial Thai Compound Words

PickUpThai: Colloquial Thai Compound Words

Colloquial Thai Compound Words…

Word you know + Word you know = Word you probably don’t know!

It’s me again, Yuki Tachaya (from Pick up Thai), a professional private Thai teacher who loves to teach things that textbooks don’t teach. Last time I wrote an article on colloquial terms & expressions, if you’ve missed it, you can read it here: Colloquial Thai Terms and Expressions. This time, I’d like to share with you guys some useful Thai compound words that we do use frequently in everyday colloquial Thai! I am sure you have learned all those compound words that contain the word “ใจ” or “ขี้” – the classic sets! This article will show you something similar but new, exciting, interesting and useful!! Enjoy.

1. ทำตัว /tam tua/
ทำ to do, to make + ตัว body, self = ทำตัว to behave.

ถ้าทำตัวไม่ดี อดกินขนมนะ
If you don’t behave, you won’t get your treat.

2. หักหน้า /hàk nâa/
หัก to break + หน้า face = หักหน้า to make someone lose face, to embarrass someone.

เขาชอบหักหน้าเราต่อหน้าคนอื่น
He always makes me lose face in front of other people.

3. ไม่เอาไหน /mâi ao nǎi/
ไม่ negative particle + เอา to take, to get + ไหน which = ไม่เอาไหน terrible.

รสชาติไม่เอาไหนเลย วันหลังทำให้อร่อยกว่านี้หน่อยนะ
This tastes terrible. Make it more tasty next time!

4. เข้าท่า /kâo thâa/
เข้า to enter + ท่า posture, pose = เข้าท่า = good, appropriate.

ความคิดเข้าท่าดีนะ
That’s a good idea!

5. บอกใบ้ /bàwk bâi/
บอก to tell + ใบ้ mute = บอกใบ้ to give a hint.

ไม่รู้อ่ะ ช่วยบอกใบ้หน่อย
I don’t know. Give me a hint!

6. เล่นตัว /lên tua/
เล่น to play + ตัว body, self = เล่นตัว to play hard to get.

เขาชอบเล่นตัวอยู่นั่นแหล่ะ ผมชักจะเบื่อแล้ว
She keeps playing hard to get, I’m starting to get fed up.

7. ไม่เห็นหัว /mâi hěn hǔa/
ไม่ negative particle + เห็น to see + หัว head = ไม่เห็นหัว to not respect, to disregard.

เขาเจอใครก็ไม่ไหว้ ไม่เห็นหัวผู้ใหญ่เลย
This guy never bows his head to greet anyone he meets, he totally disregards the elders.

8. เรื่องมาก /reûang mâak/
เรื่อง story, affair + มาก many, a lot = เรื่องมาก picky, fussy.

เรื่องมากจัง แบบนี้เมื่อไหร่ก็ทำไม่เสร็จสักที
You’re so picky. You’ll never get it done if you don’t stop being like this!

9. ในหลวง /nai lǔang/
ใน in + หลวง royal = ในหลวง the informal term Thai people use to refer to the King.

คนไทยรักในหลวง
Thai people love their King.

10. เก็บตัว /gèp tua/
เก็บ to keep + ตัว body = เก็บตัว to isolate oneself, to introvert.

เขาชอบเก็บตัว ไม่ค่อยสุงสิงกับใคร
He likes to isolate himself and hardly ever interacts with other people.

11. ออกนอกเรื่อง /àwk nâwk reûang/
ออก to exit + นอก outside + เรื่อง story, affair = นอกเรื่อง to talk off topic, to derail.

คุยเรื่องนี้ให้รู้เรื่องก่อน อย่าเพิ่งออกนอกเรื่อง
Let’s settle this first. Don’t change the topic yet.

12. ใส่ความ /sài kwaam/
ใส่ to put + ความ matter, affair = ใส่ความ to slander.

ฉันไม่ได้ทำสักหน่อย อย่าใส่ความมั่ว
I didn’t do it. Don’t accuse me without knowing the truth!

13. มีหน้า /mii nâa/
มี to have + หน้า face = มีหน้า to not feel ashamed to do something shameful.

ผมทำให้เขาเสียใจ ผมไม่มีหน้าไปขอเขาแต่งงานหรอก
I caused her pain. I’d feel too ashamed to propose to her.

14. ลงตัว /long tua/
ลง to go down + ตัว body, self = ลงตัว arranged, settled.

ไว้ทุกอย่างลงตัวแล้วผมจะติดต่อไป
After everything is settled, I’ll contact you.

15. ให้ได้ /hâi dâai/
ให้ to give + ได้ to be able to = ให้ได้ definitely, no matter what.

ไม่ว่ายังไง ปีหน้าฉันก็จะไปลอนดอนให้ได้
Next year, I will go to London no matter what!

If you can’t get enough of Thai colloquial terms and expressions, visit my website, Pick Up Thai, and learn more cool stuff that textbooks don’t teach, like my Facebook page, PickUpThai, which I update almost every day. And don’t forget to check out my video lessons on my Youtube channel, PickUpThai, including the latest one on Popular Thai Slang.

Last but not least, learn how you can win a free private lesson with me on Skype at my Facebook page or my Twitter account.

Yuki Tachaya
Pick Up Thai | YouTube: PickUpThai | twitter: @PickupThai

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PickUpThai: Colloquial Thai Terms and Expressions

Colloquial Terms and Expressions

Colloquial Thai Terms and Expressions…

My name is Yuki Tachaya. I am a native Thai speaker (and a professional private Thai teacher). I’d like to share my knowledge of colloquial Thai with everyone here as I am well aware that Thai learners have difficult times learning colloquial terms and expressions because Thai textbooks hardly ever mention them, if they do at all. So these are some of the commonly and frequently used idioms and expressions in colloquial Thai that you have probably heard but never understood or have never heard before. Enjoy!

1. แบบ /bàep/
Thai people use the word “แบบ” or sometimes “แบบว่า” as a filler word in pretty much the same way that English speakers use the word “like”. If you pay attention, you would probably hear Thai people say this every day.

Example:

เขาบอกฉันตรงๆว่าฉันอ้วน ฉันก็แบบ..ไม่ต้องบอกก็ได้มั๊ง
He told me flat out that I was fat so I was like… he doesn’t really need to tell me this, does he?

2. บ่นเก่ง /bòn gèng/
a verb followed by เก่ง is quite often used in colloquial language. It literally means to be good at doing something. “บ่นเก่ง“ means “good at complaining.” However, Thai people use this idiom far more often and with more things than English speakers use “to be good at“. Sometimes, it means “do something all the time” rather than “good at doing something”.

Example:

พ่อสูบบุหรี่เก่ง ส่วนลูกก็ช้อปปิ้งเก่ง
The father is a chain-smoker while the daughter is a shopaholic.

3. เนียน /nian/
“เนียน” is a popular slang word among teenagers and young adults. It gets used in various contexts and the meaning keeps changing. It could mean anything from “to fit perfectly” to “to pretend nothing happened” or “to act innocent” to “to pretend one doesn’t know something”, depending on the context. “เนียน“ is very similar to the action of “camouflaging”, where you don’t get noticed and just blend with the environment.

Examples:

เขาโกหกได้เนียนมาก
He could fool everyone with his lies (nobody could notice there was something wrong).

อย่ามา(ทำ)เนียน ฉันไม่โง่นะ
Don’t act like nothing happened. I’m not stupid.

ไม่รู้ก็ไม่เป็นไร ทำเนียนๆไปไม่มีใครรู้หรอก
It’s OK if you don’t know. Just pretend you do, nobody would notice.

4. ตรงไหน /dtrong năi/
“ตรงไหน“ literally means “where”. If you say “ชอบตรงไหน”, it means “What do you like about it?” (What aspect of it do you like?) We think of aspects as spots so we ask where referring to which spots. Moreover, we also use “ตรงไหน” in phrases like “สวยตรงไหน” meaning “How is she beautiful?” and that suggests that the speaker does not think she is beautiful.

Another example:

แก่ตรงไหน
How am I old? (I’m not old!)

5. ไม่เห็น /mâi hĕn/
“ไม่เห็น“ followed by an adjective, a verb or an adverb is commonly used among people of all ages. The literal meaning of ไม่เห็น is “to not see”. For example, “ไม่เห็นสวย” means “It’s not beautiful” or “I don’t see how it is beautiful.” You use “ไม่เห็น“ to give an opinion that is different from what other people or most people think or that turns out to be different than expected. You can even use both “ไม่เห็น” and “ตรงไหน” together, such as “ไม่เห็นสวยตรงไหน”.

6. เก่งออก /gèng òk/
An adjective followed by ออก is another idiom that is frequently used in colloquial language. Literally, “ออก” means “out” but we often use “ออก“ in this context when you want to contradict other people’s opinions. For example, if you say “เขาเก่งออก”, it means “I think he’s quite good!” implying that other people or someone else doesn’t think the same. Usually you use it after someone has already given his opinion first.

Example:

A: ร้านนี้ไม่เห็นอร่อยเลย
The food here doesn’t taste good like I thought!

B: ฉันว่าอร่อยออก
I think it’s pretty good!

7. ทิ้ง /tíng/
Most people probably know the expression “บอกรัก” which means to confess one’s love. When you break up, the person who breaks up is the person who “บอกเลิก” and the other party is the person who “ถูกบอกเลิก”. “ถูก” followed by a verb is a passive voice structure. In colloquial language, we say “ทิ้ง” which means “to throw away” in the context of relationships. “ทิ้ง” (to dump) is a more informal version of “บอกเลิก” while “ถูกทิ้ง” (to be dumped) is also the same as “ถูกบอกเลิก” in meaning but more informal. It also sounds more emotional as well. People usually empathize with the person who “ถูกทิ้ง”.

8. แถม /tăem/
Generally, แถม means to “give away something for free” usually after someone has already made a purchase of something else. “ของแจกฟรี” means a freebie or a give-away and “ของแถม’ means a gift or a premium. You get “ของแถม” for free in additional to what you buy. However, in colloquial language, “แถม” has another meaning, that is “moreover” or “plus”.

Example: ผู้ชายคนนี้โคตรหล่อแถมยังใจดีอีก
This guy is super hot, plus he’s also a kind person too! (implying that the second quality comes as a gift.)

If you wish to learn more colloquial terms and expressions, please visit my website Pick Up Thai where I devote to teach Thai learners what textbooks don’t usually teach and post everything I know that I believe to be useful for Thai learners from my perspective as a language learner myself. See my Youtube video on colloquial expressions. There’s even more on my YouTube Channel: pickupthai :)

Yuki Tachaya
Pick Up Thai | YouTube: PickUpThai | twitter: @PickupThai

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