A Woman Learning Thai...and some men too ;)

Learn Thai Language & Thai Culture

Tag: podcasts

Review: PickupThai Podcast by Yuki and Miki

Pickup Thai Podcast

PickupThai Podcast…

PickupThai PodcastPickupThai Podcast teaches real Thai, not Faranged Thai. Throughout the lessons you’ll learn common sentence structures with particles and idioms that Thai people use in their daily lives (but almost never ever get mentioned in textbooks).

Learning these structures is the key to speaking real Thai – and you’ll do just that with audio files recorded in a relaxed, natural way of speaking.

At present there are two courses on offer at PickupThai Podcast, Sweet Green and Spicy Red. More will be added later. Sweet Green is for beginners to low intermediate students of Thai, and Spicy Red is for upper-intermediate and advanced learners.

Apart from using real Thai, another main selling point of PickupThai Podcast is the liberal use of humour throughout. I mean, who wouldn’t have a hoot studying Thai with sentences such as these?

วันหลังห้ามตดในที่สาธารณะอีกนะ
Don’t fart in public again, OK?

เธอคิดว่าแฟนเธอหน้าเหมือนแบรดพิทท์เหรอ
You think your boyfriend looks like Brad Pitt?

ฮีตเตอร์ผมพังก็เลยไปเมืองไทย
My heater broke, so I went to Thailand.

To get a taste of Yuki’s humour, check out her free YouTube videos. Such fun!

Each course at PickupThai Podcast includes an audio file, two artistically designed pdfs (one with transliteration and one without), and a plain text file for those who want to use the materials elsewhere (such as Anki, BYKI, or LONGDO).

Important, instead of teaching vocabulary and phrases on their own, the materials focus on teaching words and phrases in context. And what I especially appreciate is the casual mix of L’s (ล) and R’s (ร). Often we are taught only to roll our R’s, which is just not common on the street.

Using male and female voices, the audio lessons are roughly 30-40 minutes long. The recordings are clear and personable; it’s almost like having Yuki and her sister Miki chatting away in your living room! And a plus, there is no invasive music or long talking intros in the sound files. I don’t know about you, but I get impatient with courses that add unnecessary time to lessons. Instead, the intros are short and sweet, moving on quickly to what you want to learn.

As each course progresses they get slightly more difficult after each lesson, with the difficulty level being quite significant between lessons 1 and 15. If you want to compare Sweet Green to Spicy Red, from the free downloads be sure to choose each from their difficulty level, such as Sweet Green 1 and Spicy Red 1, and/or Sweet Green 11 and Spicy Red 11. If you compare Sweet Green 1 to Spicy Red 11 the results will be skewed.

PickupThai Podcast: Sweet Green Pod…

Pickup Thai Podcast

As mentioned above, there are two pdfs for Sweet Green. One with just Thai script and English and the other with transliteration and English.

The plain text file has Thai script and English, but no transliteration. NOTE: The plain text files are not carbon copies of the pdf files (sometimes there are parts missing).

Each course comes in two parts: The main conversation lessons teaching patterns and vocabulary, and a question and answer section using the patterns taught in the first lessons but with different phrases and vocabulary.

Conversation sections: First you are given the conversations at normal speed, followed by a slower speed, then the vocabulary used in the lesson. And finally, the conversation with English translations.

Question and answer sections: Using a ‘graduated-interval recall’ method similar to Pimsleur’s, the question and answer section is the power of the courses at PickupThai Podcast. A complete phrase is spoken, then broken down into smaller parts, each with their English translation. After, you are prodded to respond to Yuki’s “how do you say…”.

Each sentence pattern has four sentences using the same pattern. To keep it fun, humour is sprinkled around. Sweet Green’s sentence patterns and interactive “how do you say…” questions geared to draw out a response are a simple, yet robust way to get Thai into your head.

PickupThai Podcast: Spicy Red Pod…

Pickup Thai Podcast

As with Sweet Green there are two pdfs for Spicy Red. The Thai script pdf has English in the Vocabulary and Sentences and Translations sections only. The other pdf is the same, but with transliteration instead of Thai script.

The plain text files come with Thai script (no transliteration). The plain text files sometimes have the English translations along with the vocabulary, sometimes not.

The lessons in Spicy Red are conversation heavy, making them significantly more challenging than Sweet Green. Except for the vocabulary section that has English translations, the crutch of English in the audio files is noticeably absent. These lessons are perfect for those who want to practice listening to Thai without the overly invasive English found in many Thai lessons.

In Sweet Green each lesson covers one conversation, but in Spicy Red there are two longer conversations, each with sentence patterns similar to Sweet Green. Leading is a conversation for the first half of the storyline, then the vocabulary used, followed by a series of question sentences and true or false questions, ending with the sentences and their English translations. The second part of the lesson repeats the process with a conversation that continues the storyline.

PickupThai Podcast: Sweet Green and Spicy Red…

Pickup Thai Podcast

To cover practical situations you’ll find in real life, PickupThai Podcast teaches real Thai from as many angles as possible. In Sweet Green there are stories of a mother talking to a daughter, two strangers talking to each other, a sister talking to a brother, friends talking to each other, etc. Sweet Green focuses on daily life situations such as getting a taxi, buying food, eating out, making a phone call, going to the movies, and more. The advanced Spicy Red course concentrates on the more complicated life situations you’ll find yourself in. To see each course in detail, go to this page on PickupThai Podcast.

Now that I’ve touched on the basics, why not see for yourself? Go ahead and take advantage of Yuki’s four FREE lessons at PickupThai Podcast’s store (Sweet Green and Spicy Red 1 and 11).

Yuki and Miki, PickupThai Podcast
Website: PickUpThai Podcast | Youtube: Yuki Tachaya | twitter: @PickupThai

Share Button

Free Podcasts in the Thai Language

Free Podcasts in the Thai Language

Free Thai podcasts to peruse…

For language learners who learn from abroad, podcasts can be a convenient way to access native media in the language they’re learning, directed at native speakers. If you’re learning French or a language of similar status, you’re spoilt for choice; there are scores of podcasts on offer, catering to every taste and interest. Unfortunately, the situation is very different for us Thai learners. This post summarizes the few podcasts I know that publish episodes on a regular basis (as of January 2013). If you know any other podcasts directed at native Thai speakers, please add them in the comments!

Voice of America’s daily news round-up: Monday to Friday, VoA publishes a 30 minute program with global, US and Asian news, and reports on health, science, entertainment, technology as well as the occasional interview. It has quite a good mix of topics, and Thai news are covered to some extent. It’s clearly the number one news podcast in Thai.

VoA has also a good website, and there are transcripts (or close transcripts) for many of the reports they broadcast. VoA also has a weekend program on iTunes, as well as an alternative version of its weekday program. Mike from Self Study Thai offers VoA audio and transcripts in a convenient format with English translations.

NHK Japan’s daily news program: NHK publishes a daily 14 minute (Monday to Friday) or 9 minute (Saturday, Sunday) news podcast in Thai. They bring almost exclusively news related to Japan, with very little coverage of world news and almost no coverage of Thai news. It’s very Japanese, formal and boring. The Thai they use is beautiful, though.

SBS Australia: SBS publishes short news clips on a regular basis, about 2-5 per week. The clips are directed at Thais living in Australia. A few of this year’s topics were: bush fires, rip current safety tips, natural gas development divides Queensland, Assad’s speech, coal industry. I spent some time working in Australia and enjoy listening to news from down under, but if you have no connection to Australia, their selection of topics might not mean much to you.

There are some more podcasts on iTunes to be found but they don’t add episodes anymore. There’s nothing from Thai broadcasters as far as I’m aware of.

Share Button

April/May: Look Who’s Talking About Learning Thai

Look Who's Talking About Learning Thai

Who’s talking about learning Thai…

The results for the Top 25 Language Learning Blogs 2011 and the Top 100 Language Lovers 2011 are in. Thank you for your support everyone. I’m surprised where I placed but you won’t hear any quibbling from me! And I promise to keep up the pace.

WLT’s generous contributors …

If you missed it, Benjawan Poomsan Becker’s The Interpreter’s Journal teaser is a must read: How it Started, Mistakes and Misinterpretations and Studying Foreign Languages.

Benjawan was interviewed recently on VOA as well (thanks for the reminder Andrej!): Benjawan on VOA 1 and Benjawan on VOA 2.

Next up is Hugh with his excellent Thai Language Thai Culture tips in Spicing Up Your Life. And if you are reading this now (like when this post goes live), be sure to check back for Hugh’s humdinger of a post on Friday.

There were two Getting By With Learning Thai interviews for this session (note: two more are on the way!): The lovely Snap and our very own Thai school reviewer Tod Daniels.

Tod contributed to the two theme by writing two of his bang-4-the-baht Thai Language School Reviews: AUA Thai Language Program and PRO Language. Good stuff.

Note: If you would like to contribute posts and/or if you have a talent for Thai, please contact me.

April/May: Who’s talking about learning Thai…

A new addition is Jeff Netto with The Thai Challenge. I wrote about Jeff’s Thai adventure a week ago in The Thai Challenge PLUS The 6 Week Challenge.

Jeff doesn’t blog often but he does share his tallies on twitter (@JNatAlkhimia) and YouTube (JNatAlkhimia). He’s recently added two more YouTube videos: 6 Weeks/Thai Challenge – Update 13 May 2011 and Keep the (Thai) Challenge up at the Survival Camp.

Jeff is an accomplished language learner so if you are interested in seeing how he tackles Thai then signing up for his accounts is a logical move. But I’m sure you already knew that. Right?

Andrej: Bakunin Learns Thai (no longer online)

Andrej’s ‘Tadoku results’ discusses the ‘Read More or Die’ competition. It’s an excellent language goal to set your language learning sights on and one day I will.

I knew this was coming but even so I was hoping for a reprieve: ‘The end’. Andrej has one of the most interesting blogs out there on languages and Thai so he will be missed.

Brett Whiteside: Learn Thai from a White Guy| twitter: @LTfaWG

Brett has been working hard on an iPhone app: Learn Thai Squiggles Iphone App is Live. I have a copy and will review it when I write my massive re-review of Thai iPhone apps. Promise.

Hamish: Tweet Yourself Thai | twitter: @AjarnPasa

The Thai elections are upon us so Hamish is explaining the Thai used. His first post on the subject is Tweet Yourself Elected. Stay tuned for more!

Josh Sagar: Let’s Talk Thai (formerly Learning Thai)

One can never get enough of Thai Homophones and Homographs. Josh is asking for more so if you know of any, drop by.

Julien: Diary of a Crazy Farang (no longer online)

Julien is still plugging away to learn as much Thai as he can in a short time. When you are strapped for time it’s important to jot down your bits which is exactly what Julien is doing in these posts: ‘Goals for May’, ‘My routine for May’, ‘Goals for April’, and ‘Report of April…’.

Palmisano: Thai Blog

Do you need to get around Facebook in Thai? How about a website in Thai? If yes, then the Thai Menu (not for eating) Part 1 and Part 2 will ease your way. Another useful post is The Thai equivalent to ‘-er’. I haven’t had a chance to read it but I intend to.

Richard Barrow: Using the iPhone in Thailand (no longer online)

I have been so lax on getting my iPhone apps review updated! Lucky for us, Richard isn’t as slack. He has two reviews for this period: ‘Thai Phrasebook on your iPhone’ and ‘Learn Thai Squiggles on your iPhone’ (Brett’s new iPhone app).

Rikker Dockum: Thai 101

The call for Project Gutenberg Thailand Beta Testers went out in April so if you are interested, check with Rikker to see if it’s still on.

Snap: Learning Thai In Chiang Mai

Snap is attending Pro Language, one of the most popular Thai language schools in Chiang mai. To keep us posted she’s written about her experiences with Pro Language Course – What have I learnt so far?

Stu Jay Raj: stujay.com

The iPad arrived in Thailand and what a nice piece of kit. I got my hands on one (thanks Scott) as did Stu. I don’t have a Kindle but Stu does and he’s compared them side by side: Amazon’s Kindle versus Apple’s iPad – What’s best for Language Learning? A follow up post is also planned.

Talen: Thailand, Land of Smiles (no longer online)

Talen is also going to Pro Language, but in Pattaya. Same as Snap, he’s also written about his Thai learning experiences: ‘200 Hours of Formal Thai Language Classes’. But if you don’t have 200 hours to invest in learning Thai then this post dangles ’10 phrases you should know for your Thailand holiday’.

Terry Fredrickson and Jon Fernquest: Bangkok Post, Learning From News

I planned on writing a post about what happened last May but I ducked. Instead, here’s One year after. In Empty villages, it’s yet another year later, another tragedy, only this time it’s on the Thai border. On a lighter note here’s Hunting for Ants as food. They look tasty but I haven’t had Maeng mun… yet.

Podcasts about learning Thai…

Bangkok Podcast

The Thai Language Series at Bangkok Podcast has been putting out great shows. First up is (at number 10) Untranslatable Thai Words, second up (at number 11) we have Is Learning Thai Hard? and third (at number 12) is an interview with Thai Language Series 12: Daniel Fraser. Daniel learned Thai all on his lonesome. Impressive.

YouTube channels about learning Thai…

Adjima Thaitrong: Learn Thai with Mod, fun & easy!

Sweet Mod has two videos to share (again with the twos). Mod created a follow up post about restaurants, Learn Thai – Restaurant Conversations.

Bloggers who sometimes tweet more than they blog…

Bloggers who bounce between twitter and blogging:

Ajarn Pasa: Tweet Yourself Thai | twitter: @AjarnPasa
Ajarn Pasa is one of the few here who gives twitter and blogging equal time.

Kaewmala: Thai Women Talks | twitter: @Thai_Talk @thai_idioms
Kaewmala is a political gal at @Thai_Talk but also shares needed insights on the Thai language at @thai_idioms and @lanna_talk.

Rikker Dockum: Thai 101 | twitter: @thai101
Rikker sometimes blogs, sometimes podcasts, but mostly twitters.

Who’s doing all that Thai twittering…

The (mostly) complete Thai twitter list:

@AjarnPasa
@andrewbiggs
@English4thai
@JNatAlkhimia
@js100radio
@ikimmim
@lanna_talk
@LTfaWG
@literallythai
@stu_jay
@Thai101
@ThaiAlive
@ThaiShortNews
@thai_idioms
@Thai_Talk

Note: The full list of both twitter people and bloggers can be found here: Thai Language Bloggers. Let me know if anyone is missing.

Share Button

March: Look Who’s Talking About Learning Thai

Look Who's Talking About Learning Thai

Who’s talking about learning Thai…

Goodness, the hot months of 2011 are just marching in! Ok, March was still sort of coolish but I’m typing this out in HOT HOT HOT April and it’s HOT! And while the months are marching on, I’m still posting this series late. Yeah.

Anyway, if you’d like to see the previous months, here they are: September, October, November, December, January, February… and now March.

WLT’s generous contributors …

For March, Luke Cassady-Dorion came in with two Farang Pok Pok shows: Episode 1 and Episode 2. And I’m already ready for MORE! You?

On the educational side, Tod Daniels reviewed my favourite Thai language school so far, Jentana & Associates.

There were three interviews this month: Adam Bradshaw, a Successful Thai Language Learners. And Talen, in the Getting by With Learning Thai section.

Thank you everyone, for taking the time to create these valuable posts for readers of WLT!

Note: If you would like to contribute posts and/or if you have a talent for Thai, please contact me.

March 2011: Who’s talking about learning Thai…

I don’t often mention forums and maybe it’s time to start.

A recent discussion was created on the ThaiVisa Thai forum that some of you might be interested in: What Level Of Speaking And Writing Thai Are You At? And how did you get there? It has the same concept as my two interview series: Successful Thai Language Learners and Getting by in Thai. Only, the questions are shorter, a photo is not required, and posting is freeform.

The comments don’t always keep to subject but it’s a great post regardless. I’m hoping some of you share your experiences there as well. Or you could just send your bits to me. That’ll work.

And since I’ve opened the forum can of worms, here are interesting posts from the other top two Thai learning forums: Thai-Language.com: How Do You Study Thai? and Paknanm: Learning Thai with cartoons/movies.

Andrej: Bakunin Learns Thai (no longer online)

Once again, Andrej had a productive month. First up, his experiences with speaking Thai and extensive reading in Thai. Then he searches around for a Monolingual Thai dictionary. And finally, he suggests crashing a Tadoku contest. Sweet!

Anothai Dara: Anothaidara

Anothai Dara is back with an album review of ‘Potato – Human’. Excellent.

Brett Whiteside: Learn Thai from a White Guy

This month Brett delves into Thai wiki: เรื่องจากข่าว March 28th, 2011.

Hamish: Tweet Yourself Thai | twitter: @AjarnPasa

Hamish has three unrelated and totally interesting posts this month: Quackery, fear mongering and social networks, Snow falls in Chiang Rai … fifty six years ago, and Have you ever seen an elephant?

Julien: Diary of a Crazy Farang (no longer online)

And it’s great to know that Julien is still going strong with ‘My daily routine, ‘Schliemann’s Method, and ‘Be a parrot’.

Kaewmala: Thai Woman Talks – Language, Politics & Love

I don’t know about you, but Weird Thai Nicknames have drawn my attention ever since I was first introduced to Thai students Jeep, Joke, Mam, and Joe. And still I can’t get enough of them.

Lani: Tell Thai Heart

Lani’s well-written post, unlearning thai, is her personal outpouring of the dreary motivational challenges with learning Thai. Sticking to the daily grind can be tough (I tussle with it as well).

Palmisano: Thai Blog

Plugging along, Palmisano shares more about the Thai language with these four posts: Nee nan non, Long and keun, Showing, in Thai, and How to say jealous in Thai.

Snap: Learning Thai In Chiang Mai

InRead it to me in Thai please, Snap introduces a wonderful Thai speaking resource, SitePal. It’s not exact – whatever is? – but it’s useful.

Terry Fredrickson and Jon Fernquest: Bangkok Post, Learning From News

There’s always a large array of subjects to choose from at the Bangkok Post and this week I’m going with a slightly different theme: Free condoms at gay nightspots, Teenagers not using condoms, taking risks, and Is Bangkok safe?

Podcasts about learning Thai…

Rikker: Bangkok Podcast

Bloggers who sometimes tweet more than they blog…

Bloggers who bounce between twitter and blogging:

Ajarn Pasa: Tweet Yourself Thai | twitter: @AjarnPasa
Ajarn Pasa is one of the few here who gives twitter and blogging equal time.

Kaewmala: Thai Women Talks | twitter: @Thai_Talk @thai_idioms
Kaewmala is a political gal at @Thai_Talk but also shares needed insights on the Thai language at @thai_idioms and @lanna_talk.

Rikker Dockum: Thai 101 | twitter: @thai101
Rikker sometimes blogs, sometimes podcasts, but mostly twitters.

Who’s doing all that Thai twittering…

The (mostly) complete Thai twitter list:

@AjarnPasa
@andrewbiggs
@English4thai
@js100radio
@ikimmim
@lanna_talk
@literallythai
@stu_jay
@Thai101
@ThaiAlive
@ThaiShortNews
@thai_idioms
@Thai_Talk

Note: The full list of both twitter people and bloggers can be found here: Thai Language Bloggers. Again, let me know if anyone is missing.

Until the April version (coming real soon), enjoy…

Share Button

February: Look Who’s Talking About Learning Thai

Look Who's Talking About Learning Thai

Who’s talking about learning Thai…

Gawd, am I late with this post, or what? I have no real excuse except for a back-to-back life, and playing catch up to that back-to-back life. How’s that? Weak… I know… I know…

Btw – if you know anything about the red character in the photo above, I’d love to know too. Ta.

WLT’s generous contributors …

In February, Hugh Leong had two great posts for learning Thai: Thai Language Thai Culture: A House is a Home and Thai Language Thai Culture: How Many Rainy Seasons are You?

Also in February, two new series were added. First up, Tod Daniel’s informative Thai Language Schools in Bangkok, where Tod outlines the benefits of Language Express. The second arrival, by yours truly, is Getting By With Learning Thai, where Greg Jorgensen promises, well… you’ll have to read it to see.

A third series hosted by Luke Cassady-Dorion was added in March but until I get around to it, here’s Luke’s interview Successful Thai Language Learner: Luke Cassady-Dorion. Pretty grand, yes?

Note: If you would like to contribute posts and/or if you have a talent for Thai, please contact me.

February: Who’s talking about learning Thai…

Julien: Diary of a Crazy Farang (no longer online)

Today I’m going to feature a recent find, ‘Diary of a Crazy Farang’. It’s written by Julian, a Frenchman with his eye on things Thai. A chunk of Thai bloggers are taking time out so it’s good timing. Julien’s aim? To be ‘fluent in Thai in 6 months’. Going great guns, Julien started out with the ‘Manee readers’ at the end of January and then switched to ‘Assimil’ in Feb. From my reckoning, there are three months to go before the end of his six month challenge. Stay tuned.

Andrej: Bakunin Learns Thai (no longer online)

When I visit Andrej’s site I put aside plenty of time to digest what he and those commenting have to say. In both Feb posts, Andrej discusses extensive reading (a decent subject to chew on): What to expect from extensive reading and Is extensive reading a good way to acquire new vocabulary?

Anothai Dara: Anothaidara

Sadly, Anothai Dara’s YouTube account has been disconnected due to copyright infringement. There is worth in what Anothai Dara was contributing to the learning Thai community but YouTube drew a line and that was that.

Brett Whiteside: Learn Thai from a White Guy

Brett came out with a fine run of posts so I’ll share all: Your Favorite Dic, Quit yer jibba-jabba Jabba, Stories from the News – Wiki, and Did you know? – Wiki.

Hamish: Tweet Yourself Thai | twitter: @AjarnPasa

Hamish focused on school kids with When I Grow Up I Don’t Want to be Corrupt – Pt 1 and When I Grow Up I Don’t Want to be Corrupt – Pt 2. Again touching on Thailand’s youth is
A Rose by Any Other Name – Valentine’s Day Special. And like Brett, Hamish has a liking for Longdo, only he’s going for Longdo’s iPhone app version.

Josh Sagar: Learning Thai, now Let’s Talk Thai

Josh’s title says it all: Stop Thinking and Learning in English! I wish I could, I wish I could ;-)

Kaewmala: Thai Woman Talks – Language, Politics & Love

The eloquent Kaewmala has three wonderful posts for Valentines Day: Thai Women, Me and the Monkey’s Uncle—Valentine’s Scrooge Edition and How to Call Your Sweetheart in Thai—Late Valentine’s Edition and Thai Particles of Endearment. All three posts are bookmark quality, for sure.

Palmisano: Thai Blog

More chatty posts have started to appear on Thai Blog so please check them out. But as my aim is to share mostly about the Thai language, here you go: If you say it enough times, it becomes the truth and How to use the Thai word Laew and You can do it, you haven’t done it, and you have got it.

Richard Barrow: Using the iPhone in Thailand (no longer online)

The Thai learning iPhone app market has started to slow down but Richard still managed to find two new additions: ‘Learn Thai for Free on the iPhone’ and ‘Google Translate for iPhone’. I tried Google Translate and while there is no denying that the potential is there, but for now it only works sometimes.

Sarawan: The Parent Vine Thailand (no longer online)

Sarawan’s excellent post about taxi safety went live on March 1st but I’m posting it in February edition because I’m running late… and… and… and I’ve got a mention :-) Be sure to stop by to find out ‘everything you wanted to know about kids and taxi safety in Thailand…but were afraid to ask’.

Snap: Learning Thai In Chiang Mai

I can always count on Snap to ask just the right questions. Both When does a dog not say woof ? – Onomatopoeia and So, why are you learning Thai? do just that.

Terry Fredrickson and Jon Fernquest: Bangkok Post, Learning From News

For February I chose posts that made me smile: First transgender flight attendants and Bike lanes for Bangkok? and Discount buying. And just because I have an interest I included Thai traditional massage.

Podcasts about learning Thai…

Bangkok Podcast: Thai Language Series

Fitting for February (Valentines and all that stuff), Bangkok Podcast interviewed the lovely Kaewmala from Thai Sex Talk.

YouTube channels about learning Thai…

Adjima Thaitrong: Learn Thai with Mod, fun & easy!

Sweet Adjima has a few tips for the guys/gals in Learn Thai – How to ask someone out (Shall we…?)

Bloggers who sometimes tweet more than they blog…

Bloggers who bounce between twitter and blogging:

Ajarn Pasa: Tweet Yourself Thai | twitter: @AjarnPasa
Ajarn Pasa is one of the few here who gives twitter and blogging equal time.

Kaewmala: Thai Women Talks | twitter: @Thai_Talk @thai_idioms
Kaewmala is a political gal at @Thai_Talk but also shares needed insights on the Thai language at @thai_idioms and @lanna_talk.

Rikker Dockum: Thai 101 | twitter: @thai101
Rikker sometimes blogs, sometimes podcasts, but mostly twitters.

Who’s doing all that Thai twittering…

The (mostly) complete Thai twitter list:

@AjarnPasa
@andrewbiggs
@English4thai
@js100radio
@ikimmim
@lanna_talk
@literallythai
@stu_jay
@Thai101
@ThaiAlive
@ThaiShortNews
@thai_idioms
@Thai_Talk

Note: The full list of both twitter people and bloggers can be found here: Thai Language Bloggers. Again, let me know if anyone is missing.

Until March (coming real soon!) enjoy…

Share Button

January: Who’s Talking About Learning Thai

Look Who's Talking About Learning Thai

Who’s talking about learning Thai…

This is the fifth Who’s talking about learning Thai post. How time flies. September was the first post in the ongoing series, followed by October, November, and December.

A couple of the bloggers mentioned in the first part of the series haven’t updated their sites in awhile, but that’s generally how it goes. Bloggers come in with a flurry of posts and then life intervenes. Anyway, I’ll keep them on a roster in case they reappear.

WLT’s generous contributors …

For January, long-time guest writer Hugh Leong sent in a handy post, Thai Language Thai Culture: At the Supermarket. During a chat with Hugh I mentioned that my housekeeper shortens supermarket to ‘supha’ which is quite fun. But apparently it hasn’t reached Chiang mai yet.

The second guest post comes from Luke Cassady-Dorion. Luke is a bit of a linguist so he decided to review L-Lingo’s Burmese & Thai Language Learning Software on his school break. I have L-Lingo’s Thai version and I can attest to the value of this software. It is good. And I do plan on writing a review.

The final post comes from Tod Daniels. Tod(d) is well-known for checking out Thai language schools. And lucky for us, he’s agreed to write a series on the subject. You can read all about it at Overview: Reviewing Thai Language Schools in Bangkok.

There were two interviews in the month of January. First came the lovely Grace Robinson, followed by the handsome Nils Bastedo. Grace attended Chiang Mai University for a year, and is now in the country on a scholarship. Nils is busy making plans to relocate to Thailand.

Note: If you would like to contribute posts and/or if you have a talent for Thai, please contact me.

Bangkok Motorbike Festival

January: Who’s talking about learning Thai…

Andrej: Bakunin Learns Thai (no longer online)

Andrej has one post for January, ‘Reading Thai’. But as they are connected, here’s his post from early February: ‘What to expect from extensive reading’. When you read the second post check out the comments. Resources from his posts to save for later are dek-d.com (portal) and Second language reading and incidental vocabulary learning (pdf download – no longer online … but I have it).

Brett Whiteside: Learn Thai from a White Guy

Brett’s been traveling for several months, coming back ‘home’ just in time to write ช่วงนี้ I’ve been a little ยุ่ง. The main focus is a short description in Thai about his laptop computer, so those of you needing computer vocabulary will find it useful.

Hamish: Tweet Yourself Thai | twitter: @AjarnPasa

I can always depend on Hamish for timely Thai holiday posts: National Children’s Day, Teachers Day, and Chinese New Year. Each post has Thai script, roll overs, and fabulous sound files.

Chris: chris_thai_student

Chris makes a good point in Why Language learning classes won’t work. I’ve heard that one hour of language class needs two to four hours of study/use, so we seem to be on the same page. In Loooong vowels and six tones in Thai, he adds another tone to the mix. Not five? Six? Yes. Six. Be sure to check it out.

Josh Sagar: Let’s Talk Thai (formerly Learning Thai)

In Double Adjectives and Adverbs (Reduplication), Josh touches on how to add emphasis when speaking Thai. One of the first I learned was จริงๆ เหรอ /jing jing rĕr/. It was so funny to say and I said it often (my early overuse must have been annoying).

Martyn: Beyond The Mango Juice

As Martyn is starting to pepper his posts with Thai I’m going to post one that made me smile: Sanook Singmat and Look Tewadah – เพลงลูกเทวดา. It’s from December so I’m cheating a bit, but I was out of town when it went live. So. There you go.

Mod: Learn Thai with Mod

Mod has a new blog and she’s doing quite well with it. In Order food Mod introduces patterns. I have a thing about learning Thai with patterns so IMHO, her teaching style right on the money.

Palmisano: Thai Blog

Palmisano continues with the needed basics of the Thai language: What are the Thai question words?, Titles in Thai (Mr, Miss, Mrs, etc), and Thai Possessive Words.

Richard Barrow: Using the iPhone in Thailand (no longer online)

Richard has a great roundup for learning Thai apps for the iPhone and iPad. ‘Thai for Beginners for the iPhone’ is my favourite (I have apps to give away this week). The ‘HEdictionary English Thai app’ is for both iPhone and iPad. The ‘Thai Talkboard’ for the iPad has a curious design (very PC). Looking at the phrases on offer, they are just the sort one would need walking around with an iPhone, but not an iPad. The ‘Thai-English-Thai Collins Phrasebook & Dictionary’ is the latest in a growing list of products from Collins. I totally smiled at Richard’s mention of the very Thai phrase “Do you think it is going to snow?” :-)

Sarawan: The Parent Vine Thailand (no longer online)

In ‘ABC กขค is easy as 123…’, Sarawan is venturing into the land of reading Thai by teaching her young toddler the Thai alphabet. The way I look at it, she’s in the envious position of experiencing the wonder of a child moving through the learning ah hah’s too. Sweet!

Snap: Learning Thai In Chiang Mai

Snap’s Thai post for January is Rock, Paper, Scissors…Candle? I’ve been under the weather since it came out and keep forgetting to find the answer for her. Can you?

Terry Fredrickson and Jon Fernquest: Bangkok Post, Learning From News

The subject of healthy food in Thailand often comes up, so this month I’ve chosen two posts on the subject: Food sanitation and European collaboration on food safety. Years back Thailand educated the street vendors but bacteria in food is now on the rise. Only this time, in exports.

Podcasts about learning Thai…

Bangkokpodcast.com: Thai Language Series 9: Adam Bradshaw

Apologies, I haven’t listened to this one yet. But it’s sure to be good. They all are.

YouTube channels about learning Thai…

Adjima Thaitrong: Learn Thai with Mod, fun & easy!

This month Mod brings us Restaurant expressions. That now makes a lucky 13 videos at Mod’s place. Nice.

Bloggers who sometimes tweet more than they blog…

What’s going at at twitter in the learning Thai field is sometimes fast and furious. So you don’t miss out, below are the main bloggers who bounce between twitter and blogging:

Ajarn Pasa: Tweet Yourself Thai | twitter: @AjarnPasa
Ajarn Pasa is one of the few here who gives twitter and blogging equal time.

Kaewmala: Thai Women Talks | twitter: @Thai_Talk @thai_idioms
Kaewmala is a political gal at @Thai_Talk but also shares needed insights on the Thai language at @thai_idioms and @lanna_talk.

Rikker Dockum: Thai 101 | twitter: @thai101
Rikker sometimes blogs, sometimes podcasts, but mostly twitters.

Who’s doing all that Thai twittering…

The (mostly) complete Thai twitter list:

@AjarnPasa
@andrewbiggs
@English4thai
@js100radio
@ikimmim
@lanna_talk
@literallythai
@stu_jay
@Thai101
@ThaiAlive
@ThaiShortNews
@thai_idioms
@Thai_Talk

Note: The full list of both twitter people and bloggers can be found here: Thai Language Bloggers. Again, let me know if anyone is missing.

Oh, and the photos are from the 2011 Bangkok Motorbike Festival held at the end of January. I hadn’t planned on attending but found myself in the shopping centre so took the opportunity to grab a couple of snaps. A related post will be forthcoming.

Until the February version, enjoy…

Bangkok Motorbike Festival

Share Button

December: Who’s Talking About Learning Thai

Look Who's Talking About Learning Thai

Who’s talking about learning Thai…

Well, here we are in 2011. Finally. Some of you might not know this, but I’ve been either out of Bangkok or Thailand for the best part of November/December, with chunks taken out of September/October too. So now you know why I haven’t spent a whole lot of time commenting. It’s crazy, but travel + Internet is still not as modern as we’d like it to be.

After my return, I spent the first day of the new year – 1.1.11 – taking care of two sick cats and a sick man. When the vet stopped by to give the cats shots (yes, in Thailand, vets do make house calls) we agreed that the cats had most likely taken sick from the stress of being in kennels for so long. My bad.

I’ve had cats for yaks ages, but this was my first experience around cats with colds. So 1.1.11 saw me picking up wadded Kleenix off the floor from the man, as well as chasing behind cats with the same. The details? Don’t ask. But I just might gross you out in a future post. Promise.

Anyway…

WLT’s generous contributors …

I’m going to start off with the fabulous contribution by Thai Skype teacher Khun Narisa, and that’s Thai Culture: Understanding Kreng Jai. I wrote the post, but Khun Narisa was ever-so-patient explaining the concept of kreng jai. And as it’s an important part of Thai culture to wrap your head around, it’s needed. Trust me on this.

Next up is the informative post by Sua noy, Khmer Influence in Thai. When I first started researching the beautiful Thai script I walked right into a hairy discussion of the Ram Khamhaeng Controversy. I was quickly warned off, but that didn’t stop my interest in the controversial subject as it makes Thai history even more intriguing, not less so. So another thanks goes to Sua noy.

Towards the end of the month, Hamish Chalmers (Tweet Yourself Thai) explained the workings of Polyglot, a Google Chrome Extension. And I’m proud to announce that Hamish has agreed to write a Tin Tin series on WLT. It’s fabulous stuff, so please stay tuned!

There were two interviews in December, and both involved the courageous Aaron Le Boutillier (Le Boutillier Group): Interviewing Successful Thai Language Learner: Aaron Le Boutillier and his memories shared in Remembering Tsunami 2004: And Then One Morning. May we never forget.

Note: If you would like to contribute posts and/or if you have a talent for Thai, please contact me.

December: Who’s talking about learning Thai…

Andrej: Bakunin Learns Thai (no longer online)

Andrej continues to be on a roll with ‘The Series Method’. Andrej hired Thai Skype teacher Kruu Ladawan to record basic instructions, so if you are interested, please contact Kruu Ladawan for a set of your own.

Anothai Dara: Anothaidara.com (no longer online)

For all you lovers out there, there are four songs in Anothai Dara’s December stash: ‘Kae Yahk Ja Bauk [Just Want to Tell You]’, ‘Dung Fan Chun-Dai [Just Like a Dream]’, ‘Ruk Took Reu-doo [Love for All Seasons]’, ‘Mai Roo Ja Ah-ti-bai Yahng Ngai [Don’t Know How to Explain It]’. Sweet!

Brett Whiteside: Learn Thai from a White Guy

In a short post from Brett we hear about Abstaining Waste. It is sooooo typically SE Asia. Love it!

Chris: chris_thai_student

In How to start learning a language, Chris starts the post off with Mod (newest addition to the Thai language learning community), and then rolls out excellent advice for learning languages. The notes in his second post, Stream Languages In, are especially aimed at those not living in Thailand.

Memory tricks for words makes a point I agree with: The mnemonic is a patch, to help cover a few sticky situations nothing more. As I’ve mentioned many times before, when I learned the Thai alphabet I used 60 Minutes Thai. I found 60 Minutes invaluable for getting the alphabet plus classes into my head, but to become comfortable with the Thai alphabet I had to continue on from there.

Hamish: Tweet Yourself Thai | twitter: @AjarnPasa

Already mentioned in my post, Happy New Years… Resolutions to all…, is Hamish’s post, Tin Tin’s Adventures, in Thai. Tin Tin is great because the story lines march along, holding my interest.

Are you a fan of Bird McIntyre? Well. I am. So on New Year’s Eve I was chuffed to see Hamish’s Happy New Year สวัสดีปีใหม่, with YouTube video included. Ta Hamish!

Josh Sager: Let’s Talk Thai (formerly Learning Thai)

For December, Josh has Product Review: Pimsleur Thai. If you are considering acquiring the package, it’s absolutely worth a read. And if you have questions, Josh is sure to leave his door open.

Note to language bloggers living in Thailand: Pimsleur has a policy of reaching out to bloggers (good business practice) but they don’t ship outside of the US (bad) or to language bloggers living in Thailand who are visiting the US (confusing). For Thailand, maybe they figure that we already have a pirated copy from Pantip Plaza? Psst… there is sure to be a map around here somewhere… ;-)

Martyn: Beyond The Mango Juice

I am so very proud to annouce Martyn’s first Thai language post: Sanook Singmat and Look Tewadah – เพลงลูกเทวดา. Martyn’s post went live when I was out of the country, so I didn’t get a chance to watch the video until now. It’s all good.

Palmisano: Thai Blog

If you are a beginner at learning Thai, then these are for you: Ifs, Ands, and Buts, Think Too Much, How to say ‘I’ in Thai, How to say ‘Yes’ in Thai, What is a Thai Unit Word? (be sure to check out the Thai unit word song), and Gaan and Kwaam. All but two have accompanying videos.

Richard Barrow: Using the iPhone in Thailand (no longer online)

Richard wrote two Thai iPhone app posts with a kids theme: ‘5 Bilingual Talking Books for Thai Kids’ and ‘5 Free Educational Apps for Thai Kids’. Thanks Richard!

Snap: Learning Thai In Chiang Mai

I was in transit when Thai Grammar went live, so I wasn’t any help. But others were. Nice! To script or not to script is a question most Thai language students are faced with. I’m quite biased. Are you? And Transliteration obliterations made me smile because I have SO been there.

Snap’s last post for 2011 is about yours truly: Win a Thai Dictionary iPhone App. That’s right. I have FOUR of the most fabulous Thai iPhone dictionaries to give away on the fourth. And if I get a good enough response, Chris says I can give away more. So, as they say in Thailand… up to you.

Talen: Thailand, Land of Smiles (no longer online)

In December, Talen came out with a ‘Thai Fonts’ download pdf. It’s totally handy for those confusing moments when you are trying to figure out what Thai letter turned into a U or a C or or or…

Terry Fredrickson and Jon Fernquest: Bangkok Post, Learning From News

As it’s the end of the year, I’ve chosen three timely posts: EDIT … Apologies, the Bangkok Post has taken them offline.

Podcasts about learning Thai…

This month, instead of Rikker in the Thai language seat on Bangkok Podcast, we have the knowledgable Hamish Chalmers from Tweet Yourself Thai. It’s a beaut so be sure to give a listen to Episode 32: Thai Language Series 8: Hamish Chalmers.

To celebrate, Hamish even created a special post for Greg and Tony: Bangkok Podcast.

Bloggers who sometimes tweet more than they blog…

Bloggers who bounce between twitter and blogging:

Ajarn Pasa: Tweet Yourself Thai | twitter: @AjarnPasa

Ajarn Pasa is one of the few here who gives twitter and blogging equal time.

Kaewmala: Thai Women Talks | twitter: @Thai_Talk @thai_idioms

Kaewmala is a political gal at @Thai_Talk but also shares needed insights on the Thai language at @thai_idioms and @lanna_talk.

Rikker Dockum: Thai 101 | twitter: @thai101

Rikker sometimes blogs, sometimes podcasts, but mostly twitters.

Who’s doing all that Thai twittering…

The (mostly) complete Thai twitter list:

@AjarnPasa
@andrewbiggs
@English4thai
@js100radio
@ikimmim
@lanna_talk
@literallythai
@stu_jay
@Thai101
@ThaiAlive
@ThaiShortNews
@thai_idioms
@Thai_Talk

Note #1: The full list of both twitter people and bloggers can be found here: Thai Language Bloggers. Again, let me know if anyone is missing.

Note #2: I started this post all arrogant like because I was in good health and the rest of the house were not. But by the time I made it down to here I started sneezing and coughing and complaining, which is guaranteed to result in copious drams of whisky being drunk. By someone. Drat. Darn. Double drat.

Until the January 2011 version, enjoy…

Share Button

November: Who’s Talking About Learning Thai

Look Who's Talking About Learning Thai

Who’s talking about learning Thai…

Welcome to the third edition in this series, where I share bloggers, twitter peeps, and podcasters all talking about the Thai language. The previous two posts can be found here: Archive for Talking About Learning Thai.

Apologies…yeah… again… this post should have gone around the first of the month but when I found myself sleepless in Seattle, I cratered. I’m now in Bangkok, but on Seattle time. Shrug. Same same. No different. Better luck next time? Heh.

WLT’s generous contributors…

November was a fabulous month for guest authors. First up was Nils Bastedo with How to Gain Insight into the Thai Language from How Thais Learn English. As you might have noticed, Thais speaking English will sometimes add a Thai twist to our language. In his post, Nils explains how to use this knowledge to help with Thai pronunciation.

There are a growing number of Thais learning Thai. Lani Cox (our first author in the series), grew up with pretty close to nadda Thai so has taken on the challenge. While Kaewmala, fluent in Thai, decided to learn the intriguing details of her native language. In her two posts, Thais Learning Thai: Kaewmala from Thai Talk: Part 1 and Part 2, we are impressed yet again by Kaewmala’s curiosity about the Thai language and culture.

When Lani sent in her Part 2 of A Thai Learning Thai, I was struck by the very useful advice: “I try to learn words that I don’t think I’ll ever use because this time around I know that just because I won’t ever use that word doesn’t mean someone else won’t.” Many times I skip over vocabulary out of disinterest, but Lani is so very right.

WLT’s prolific author, Hugh Leong, contributed the excellent post Is That a กัน Gan in Your Pocket?. Posts such as these increase our Thai vocabulary threefold. Thank you Hugh!

How Do YOU Say Worchestershire? isn’t exactly a guest post, but there were guest appearances from: Khun Gung, Khun Phairoh, Khun Narisa, Alex Szecsenyi, Amy Praphantanathorn, Christopher, Claudio Sennhauser, David Airey, Jill Schulman, Paul Garrigan, and Tom Stephan. Thanks all, I couldn’t have done it without your contributions.

Note: If you would like to contribute posts and/or if you have a talent for Thai, please contact me.

November: Who’s talking about learning Thai…

Andrej: Bakunin Learns Thai (no longer online)

Andrej, featured in the second post in this series, shares the resources working for him in List of educational kids videos. Andrej walks us through the method in Go Genius รู้รอบตัว – contents. The resource 100 interesting things book series by Se-ed is new to me so after the holidays I’ll see about tracking them down.

As you know, Andrej is studying – or rather, ‘not’ studying – Thai via the ALG/TV method. And after reading a couple of November posts about learning a foreign language, he just wanted to make the point that for him, Learning Thai is a pleasure. Still on a roll, Andrej finishes November with the informative, Working with a language partner.

Anothai Dara: Anothaidara

Anothai Dara is my favourite musical energiser bunny. And as it’s not possible to share everything posted, I’ve grabbed a few songs from the November blogroll: Pay Obeisance to the Earth, Is the Reception Bad (Or Is There a Problem With Your Heart)?, and Sleepless (it’s a sad song – but I couldn’t resist the title).

Thank you Anothai Dara, for taking the time to sub so many Thai songs.

Chris: chris_thai_student

Chris has two posts for November. The comic Opposites, where he shares the hilarious video by David Allen (not for young ears). And the more serious Homophones, where Chris discusses Chinese and Thai. It’s something I really haven’t thought about. Apparently, as Thai is tonal, with a tonal twist we are automatically thrown into new vocabulary, avoiding the homophone problem. Mostly.

David Long: AUA Thai blog

Last month I totally missed David Long’s post, The Natural Order of Language Acquisition where he discusses the order of learning a language: Understanding, speaking, reading, writing. Apologies David, you have now been included in my monthly check.

Hamish: TweetYourselfThai | twitter: @AjarnPasa

TweetYourselfThai covers recent happenings in Thailand. As this is November, we were treated to Loy Krathong. In Poo Dee Angrit – The English Gentleman Hamish brings in sound. I believe it’s a fabulous idea so if you do too, please stop by and say so.

Btw: not only is TweatYourselfThai on twitter, but Hamish has recently gone Facebook too.

Jon Russell: Jonny Foreigner

New daddy Jon offers some excellent advice in his post Preparation before learning to read Thai. My top pick? Ignore phonetic western spellings. Absolutely.

Kaewmala: Thai Woman Talks – Language, Politics & Love

The lovely Kaewmala treats us not only with two guest interviews on WLT, Part 1 and Part 2, but on her site she enlightens us about Thai Dog Idioms – Part 1: Pissed for My Canine Friends. And truthfully, I didn’t realise the lack in Thailand either (please read her post to see what I mean).

Lani Cox: tell thai heart

As mentioned above, guest author Lani sent in her wonderful post, A Thai Learning Thai: Lani: Part 2. And on her blog, she also penned Learning Thai is making me a better English teacher. If you too are doubting your Thai studies, or are teaching English at the same time as learning Thai, it’s a good read. Actually, it’s a good read no matter what.

Megan: Bangkok Reality Smackdown

While not exactly about learning Thai, I couldn’t resist sharing Megan’s clever post, Challenge: Explaining a Thai Music Video. Well done Megan :-) And with much hilarity, Megan delves into Challenge: Asking WHY. Btw, why in Thai is ทำไม /tam-mai/ (often followed by ไม่ เข้าใจ /mâi kâo jai/ – I don’t understand).

Paul Garrigan: paulgarrigan.com

Paul makes his first appearance in this series with the comic: And the Award for Slowest Ever Thai Language Learner Goes To… More please. Oh yes. More!

Palmisano: Thai Blog

Worth a look are three posts on ending particles: krap and ka, na and ah, and wa, woi, fa, and foi. Breaking the Thai Tones, Legally gets a mention as well.

Rikker Dockum: Thai 101

Rikker puts out a call for help with his Project Gutenberg Thailand (liberating public domain Thai literature), following it up with instructions in Some nitty gritty (and a sample Thai ebook).

And in Rikker’s October post, Bureaucracy insanity: What makes a good Thai teacher? the comments heated up a treat.

Sarawan: The Parent Vine Thailand (no longer online)

Please give a warm welcome to Sarawan (a Thai learning Thai). Sarawan brings us a brand spanking new site, The Parent Vine. The soft launch introduced the section, ‘Learning Thai with your child’. And while the post is marked October, the site wasn’t really open to the rest of the world until November sometime (hence, the mention here).

Snap: Learning Thai In Chiang Mai

In Probably my dumbest question…ever!, Snap asks a great question: “If singing is tonal and Thai is tonal, how can Thai be sung to a tune…exactly?” Rikker stops by to enlighten us all, so you be sure to stop by too! Following her musical debut, Snap jumps right into Dissecting The Elephant Song.

It’s interesting to watch Snap finding the many quirks of the Thai language. In So, is it soon, soon or soon? she comes across the R/L switch in Thai conversation.

Snap finishes off November with her First day of school. Yeah and congrats! I’m looking forward to many more posts from a new student learning Thai.

Talen: Thailand, Land of Smiles (no longer online)

Talen is doing fabulously with his Thai studies. Early November he came out with ‘The Consonants’. Impressive, and I can’t wait to see what he writes about next.

Terry Fredrickson and Jon Fernquest: Bangkok Post, Learning From News

While their section at the Bangkok Post is for Thais learning English, students of Thai reap the benefits as well.

My picks for November are: tolerance/intolerance, Living in America: conclusion, and Flood watch.

Podcasts about learning Thai…

Rikker: Bangkok Podcast

In the 7th of their Thai Language Series, Rikker covers Thai holidays. If you want to fast-forward to where Rikker makes his entrance, skip to 13.40 in iTunes.

YouTube channels about learning Thai…

This is a new section but as I’m out of time (Nov/Dec are crazy crazy) I’ve limited myself to introducing just one YouTube channel, the lovely Adjima (Mod).

Adjima Thaitrong: Learn Thai with Mod, fun & easy!

A new addition to Thai lessons on YouTube is Adjima Thaitrong, known as Mod. In November Adjima added four posts to her channel: Taxi conversation and verb to be.

Isn’t she lovely? If you want to take Thai lessons from Mod either in person or via Skype, her contact details have been added to WLT’s two sections for Thai teachers: Thai Teachers and Learn Thai via Skype: Locating Teachers and Schools.

You can also contact Mod via her new website: Learn Thai With Mod.

Please stay tuned for a dedicated post about Mod and her wonderful YouTube channel, set to go live towards the end of the month.

Bloggers who sometimes tweet more than they blog…

Ajarn Pasa: Tweet Yourself Thai | twitter: @AjarnPasa

Ajarn Pasa is one of the few here who gives twitter and blogging equal time.

Kaewmala: Thai Women Talks | twitter: @Thai_Talk @thai_idioms

Kaewmala is a political gal at @Thai_Talk but also shares needed insights on the Thai language at @thai_idioms and @lanna_talk.

Rikker Dockum: Thai 101 | twitter: @thai101

Rikker sometimes blogs, sometimes podcasts, but mostly twitters.

Who’s doing all that Thai twittering…

The (mostly) complete Thai twitter list:

@AjarnPasa
@andrewbiggs
@AnothaiDara
@English4thai
@js100radio
@ikimmim
@lanna_talk
@literallythai
@stu_jay
@Thai101
@ThaiAlive
@ThaiShortNews
@thai_idioms
@Thai_Talk

Please let me know if I’ve missed anyone.

Signing off…

Note: The full list of both twitter people and bloggers can be found here: Thai Language Bloggers. Again, let me know if anyone is missing.

Until the December version, enjoy…

Share Button

AJ From Effortless English Learns Thai

AJ Thailand

AJ the Effortless language student…

AJ from the Effortless English Club – an online English language course – flew to Bangkok at the end of December to put his language learning system to the test.

Only this time the language is Thai, not English. And this time, one of his top students (Jan) will be the teacher, with AJ taking the role of student.

In preparation, AJ started easy listening with Teach Yourself Thai the month before leaving for Thailand.

No grammar. No exercises. No boring stuff. Just listening and learning vocabulary.

Employing the same deep learning method he uses when teaching at the Effortless English Club, AJ listened to the same audios over and over.

Once in BKK, AJ plans to instruct Jan on his system.

I wonder how he’s getting along…

Share Button