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Tag: Thai For Beginners (page 1 of 2)

FREE Audio and Vocabulary Downloads: Thai for Beginners, Intermediate and Advanced

Language Habit Toolkit

Benjawan Poomsan Becker and Paiboon Publishing…

When it comes to all things Thai language, Benjawan Poomsan Becker (Paiboon Publishing) is an amazing powerhorse. I do not know where she gets all her energy.

Benjawan is also as generous as all get-out to the Thai language learning community. Her most recent contribution came about during WLT’s ninth year celebration where she gave permission for me to record and release the vocabulary for her three classic Thai courses: Thai for Beginners, Thai for Intermediate and Thai for Advanced Readers.

Below you’ll find the downloads for audio files and spreadsheets. I’ve created spreadsheets for Flashcards Deluxe but they can also be used for Anki. If you are interested in creating Anki files please let me know via WLT’s contact form.

Using the materials, a manageable 100 words at a time, John Smith is contributing to the collection by creating Memrise courses. Thanks John!

Spreadsheet Downloads: Thai for Beginners, Intermediate and Advanced…

The spreadsheets are in Excel and Numbers (Mac) formats. The Beginners sheet gives a choice of Thai script and transliteration. The Intermediate and Advanced spreadsheets are without transliteration.

Thai for Beginners: Download audio and spreadsheets (11.7mg)
Thai for Intermediate: Download audio and spreadsheets (10.8mg)
Thai for Advanced: Download audio and spreadsheets (9.4mg)

I use Flashcards Deluxe but the spreadsheets and audio files can be sucked into most flashcard software/apps. They’ll come in handy when studying with Benjwan’s books, or on their own. Please note that I have not checked the spreadsheets against the books so if you do find snafus just let me know via WLT’s contact form.

If you can’t find the books in your local bookstore, in the US you can order online from Paiboon Publishing. If you are elsewhere, DCO Books delivers.

Memrise:Thai for Beginners, Intermediate and Advanced…

Taking up the gauntlet, John Smith is using the materials to create Thai courses on Memrise. Memrise is a popular language learning platform with a website, iOS and Android apps.

John Smith: I’ve always found Memrise to be, hands down, the best way of learning vocabulary. It’s free, it’s engaging, and the high score aspect can even make it somewhat competitive.

Each course I’ve uploaded has 100 words. After I finish each course, I print out a list of all the words in English. I review the vocabulary until I can give the Thai translation for every single word from memory. Then it’s time to move on to the next course.

I’ve made some really amazing progress with this method so far and I would love to see some other people using my courses!

I’m at the “advanced beginner” to “intermediate” stage of learning, so this is what these courses are geared towards. It’s not every vocabulary word from every book, just the ones I didn’t already know. I’ll continue making courses and posting the links to them as I progress. Enjoy!

Thai for Beginners: Thai Vocab Builder 1
Thai for Beginners: Thai Vocab Builder 2
Thai for Beginners: Thai Vocab Builder 3
Thai for Beginners: Thai Vocab Builder 4
Thai for Beginners: Thai Vocab Builder 5
Thai for Beginners: Thai Vocab Builder 6
Thai for Beginners: Thai Vocab Builder 7
Thai for Beginners: Thai Vocab Builder 8
Thai for Beginners: Thai Vocab Builder 9
Thai for Beginners: Thai Vocab Builder 10

Leave a comment below if you’d like a spreadsheet listing the words John has not included.

Here’s a detailed tutorial showing you how to create a course on Memrise.

More from Paiboon Publishing and Word in the Hand…

For iOS and Android apps, one of the best Thai-Eng-Thai dictionaries out there comes from Paiboon Publishing and Word in the Hand. Don’t let the price scare you off – it’s worth every bit of that and more. To see what I mean, just check out the features here: Talking Thai <> English Dictionary+Phrasebook.

iOS: Talking Thai <> English Dictionary+Phrasebook
Android: Thai <> English Dictionary

Paiboon Publishing also has an iOS app for those studying with Thai for Beginners. It’s nicely designed and perfect for those short trips via taxi, standing in line, whatever.

iOS: Thai for Beginners

Quote: For beginning Thai students, or those who want to improve their basic Thai. Clear recordings of native Thais speaking each of the 3,000 words and phrases. Examples of the five tones. Increase size of text. Show or hide English text. No data charges once you download the app. Play a phrase over and over, or autoplay an entire lesson. Test your knowledge with built-in exercises. English voice can be turned on or off. Each item is presented in Thai, transliteration and English. Detailed HELP section.

And Benjawan isn’t done yet! As a professional interpreter Benjawan saw the need for more Thai interpreters in the US and other countries so she launched Paiboon Language Academy, an online interpretation and translation school for Thai speakers. If you are curious here’s the Paiboon Language Academy Press Release.

Website: paiboonlanguageacademy.com
Facebook: Paiboon Language Academy

I just can’t wait to see what Benjawan comes up with next.

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WLT’s 2017 Thai Language Lovers Giveaway: Benjawan and Paiboon Publishing

Top 100 Language Lovers of 2017

WLT’s 2017 Thai Language Lovers Giveaway…

Top Language Lovers 2017Welcome to the THIRD prize in WLT’s 2017 Thai Language Lovers giveaway! Please read Vote THAI | 2017: Top 100 Language Lovers Competition to find out what to expect.

If you haven’t voted yet (one vote per section) clicking the red Top Language Lovers logo to the right will take you there :)

Benjawan and Paiboon Publishing: Free audio downloads…

From WLT’s beginning, Benjawan Poomsan Becker (the Queen of the Thai language), has gifted WLT’s readers with free Thai courses and Thai apps.

And when I asked Benjawan if I could please include a ripped vocabulary list created from her Thai for Beginners, Intermediate and Advanced courses for my post Thai Frequency Lists with English Definitions, she generously said “sure!”

To celebrate WLT’s ninth year I went back to Benjawan and asked permission to record the three vocabulary lists for download. Again, she came back with “absolutely!”

What I didn’t realise going into this project was how time-consuming and physically tiring it would be to record, edit, name, and rerecord over 2000 audio files. Wowza.

Yet in Benjawan’s Talking Thai-English-Thai dictionary she managed almost 200,000. So kudos and megga thanks to Benjawan – you are amazing – and I have proof!

Downloads: Thai for Beginners, Intermediate and Advanced…

The spreadsheets are in Excel and Numbers (Mac) formats. The Beginners sheet gives a choice of Thai script and transliteration. The Intermediate and Advanced spreadsheets are without transliteration.

Thai for Beginners: Download audio and spreadsheets (11.7mg)
Thai for Intermediate: Download audio and spreadsheets (10.8mg)
Thai for Advanced: Download audio and spreadsheets (9.4mg)

I use Flashcards Deluxe but the spreadsheets and audio files can be sucked into most flashcard software/apps. They’ll come in handy when studying with Benjwan’s books, or on their own. Please note that I have not checked the spreadsheets against the books so if you do find snafus just let me know via WLT’s contact form.

If you can’t find the books in your local bookstore, in the US you can order online from Paiboon Publishing. If you are elsewhere, DCO Books delivers.

Disclaimer: This is not a professionally recorded project. Using an iPhone during the rainy season in both Bangkok and Chiang mai, we battled through the unwelcome noise of frogs, rainstorms, cicadas, planes, tuk tuks, coughs and growling stomachs. Yeah – we had fun!

Thai Vocab Builder on Memrise…

UPDATE: Using the files above, John Smith created a four part course on Memrise.

Thai Vocab Builder 1
Thai Vocab Builder 2
Thai Vocab Builder 3
Thai Vocab Builder 4

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Olly’s Thai For Beginners: How to Learn to Speak Thai from Scratch

Thai For Beginners

Back in August Olly Richards (I Will Teach You A Language) and Jan Van Der Aa (Language Boost) made an appearance with The Challenge: Two Weeks to Learn Thai in Bangkok!

During those two weeks they tweeted, Facebooked, and created YouTube videos about their experience.

Once back home, Olly wrote a lengthly post detailing just how he accomplished this feat: Thai For Beginners: How to Learn to Speak Thai From Scratch.

In this post, I’m going to take a step back and reveal everything I discovered about how to study Thai as a beginner, so you can benefit from my experiments and start your journey to learn Thai on the right foot.

I’ll start by describing in detail how I learnt Thai during my mission to Bangkok. Next, I’ll answer common questions about learning Thai. Then, I’ll finish with my recommended action steps for those who want to learn to speak Thai, followed by some great resources.

And to top it off, Olly is giving away a pdf with audio files created from his copious class notes. You can download them for FREE here: 150+ Essential Beginner Thai Words & Phrases for Effective Conversations.

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Successful Thai Language Learner: Steve Stubbs

Successful Thai Language Learner

Interviewing Successful Thai Language Learners…

Name: Steve Stubbs
Nationality: British
Age range: 20-30
Sex: Male
Location: London, UK
Profession: Management Consultant / Teacher
Twitter: @SteveAStubbs

What is your Thai level?

Upper Intermediate.

Do you speak more street Thai, Issan Thai, or professional Thai?

Street Thai.

What were your reasons for learning Thai?

To be able to speak with locals, to make people laugh and smile and so that I could read menus and signs! Wherever I ended up with my teaching abroad, I was always going to give the language a go.

Do you live in Thailand? If so, when did you arrive?

I lived there for 11 months during 2012/2013 but am now in the UK. I’m looking to move back over if I can find the right job!

How long have you been a student of the Thai language?

I’d say from the summer of 2012 onwards.

Did you learn Thai right away, or was it a many-pronged approach?

I was eager to start learning the language as soon as I had booked my place on a teaching course over on Koh Kood. In the UK we have long summer holidays so I spent a lot of my time learning the foundations at home.

Did you stick to a regular study schedule?

I wouldn’t say it was a planned schedule but I tried to do a bit every day in the past. Now its harder working around a job and living in a non-Thai speaking country.. but I try to expose myself to the language each day.

What Thai language learning methods did you try?

I started using Youtube with channels like Kru Mod / Kru Wee / Kru Mia. They were all very useful and I cannot praise them enough. I then used the Thai for Beginners by Benjawan Poomsan Becker (a great series for anyone starting out) and the rest in the series. During my time in Southern Thailand, I lived in the sticks with a home stay family.. certainly this was true immersion and was really beneficial to my progression!

Did one method stand out over all others?

YouTube is great in my opinion. You can tell the teacher to pause and to go back as many times as you want! And it’s free. Also you are fully engaged visually and through sound. I find that if I am listening to just the audio, my eyes will wander.

How soon did you tackle reading and writing Thai?

After a few weeks of learning some speaking and listening, I was curious to know how this was represented using the Thai alphabet. I knew that if I wanted to truly learn this language, relying on a non-standardised transliteration script wouldn’t be the right approach.

Did you find learning to read and write Thai difficult?

Initially I found it fine. It is an artistic language and fun to practise. I also had a system for memorising the three different classes. I also like that each letter is named after an object / person / animal – another boost to the vocabulary and it makes some imagery. The parts I found hard were: Learning the ending sounds for consonants, memorising the tone rules, the different fonts!

What was your first “ah hah!” moment?

Certainly when I first showed up at Suvarnibhumi airport. I had learnt a language for 3 months or so without even practising it with anyone! I started speaking to ask someone where the Taxis were and I had that ‘ah hah!’ moment when I realised he could understand me.

How do you learn languages?

I’m a visual learner, I like using mindmaps and pictures where I can. At the moment I am using flashcards on my phone which I can flick through during tube/train journeys. I also like to watch videos in Thai on Youtube.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

Strengths: Confidence in speaking foreign languages with others, being able to pick up accents quickly, motivation to learn and try new methods.

Weaknesses: It used to be fonts but I am now more confident after practice. Now my biggest weakness is listening (especially that colloquial teenage tongue)! I need to get back to Thailand to practise this…

What is the biggest misconception for students learning Thai?

Many people are scared of the tones and the alphabet. The tones are actually not as hard as you may believe and once you crack them, they are fun to practise and to explain to fellow Westerners! They also make for a few funny mistakes down the road (Hee Maa = Snow or something else?). I believe that the Grammar in Thai is what makes picking up the basics quite simple. Once you know a verb, it stays like that for all plurals, genders, tenses – no conjugation! (I find Asian languages easier than European!) As for the alphabet, take it step by step. Perhaps learning a few new characters a day.

Can you make your way around any other languages?

Everywhere I go I like to learn the language. This has left me with a little bit of knowledge in things like Turkish, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Italian etc. I studied French in high school but it was seen as a subject in my teenage head rather than an interest and hence I haven’t been able to keep it up.

Were you learning another language at the same time as Thai?

I tried to learn a bit of Chinese at the time just out of curiosity. I didn’t pursue it in the end because I wanted to focus fully on one language.

What advice would you give to students of the Thai language?

Try and find a method that you enjoy. Overall I think mine is utilising videos as much as possible as this is what I have found most effective and engaging. Be confident! Go out there and speak with anyone and everyone. The first 5 minutes of speaking with a Thai person usually have the same questions in (I was going to put a ‘same same but different’ line in there). So if you are prepared for these and they understand, this will boost your confidence for the rest of the conversation! In my opinion, making the effort to learn the writing system really will pay off in the long run. Of course transliteration is a good starting point, but don’t rely on it for too long because you will soon encounter pronunciation issues (Transliterated karaoke lyrics look horrible to me).

Steve Stubbs,
Twitter: @SteveAStubbs

The Series: Interviewing Successful Thai Language Learners…

If you are a successful Thai language learner and would like to share your experiences, please contact me. I’d love to hear from you.

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Successful Thai Language Learner: Maarten Tummers

Successful Thai Language Learner

Interviewing Successful Thai Language Learners…

Name: Maarten Tummers
Nationality: Dutch
Age: 30-40 (yeah I don’t look like that I know, they all say that)
Sex: Male
Location: Netherlands
Website: Maarten Tummers: Obsidian Photography

Do you speak more street Thai, Issan Thai, or professional Thai?

I speak more street Thai I suppose.

What were your reasons for learning Thai?

Back in the days I planned to live in Thailand but things don’t always go as planned Nowadays one of the main reasons for keeping up with Thai is to be able to speak with my mother in law and with my Thai friends. Also I plan to go back a lot to the land of smiles and life is easier when you do speak Thai (also cheaper).

Do you live in Thailand? If so, when did you arrive?

Currently I don’t live in Thailand. I never know what the future may hold though and maybe one day I end up in Thailand again to give it another whirl.

If you live elsewhere, how often are you in Thailand?

I try to go back to Thailand for holidays every year.

How long have you been a student of the Thai language?

I think I have been “studying” for 7 years -give or take- but it’s not like I study hard every single day.

Did you learn Thai right away, or was it a many-pronged approach?

I did learn Thai right away from the get go. You know how it goes, you learn your first words, pronounce all of them wrong, and get into your first course to get some more words and phrases.

Did you stick to a regular study schedule?

Not at all.

What Thai language learning methods did you try?

I started out with a course at Chiang Mai University and bought Thai for Beginners by Poomsan after the course was done. I used this book to be able to read and write. After that it was merely a matter of plugging away. Read this, read that, talk about this and talk about that. I figured the more fun you have the faster you’ll learn any language.

Did one method stand out over all others?

The method that worked best for me is to find material you’d love to read/watch/do in in your native language but then work with that in Thai. It was quite funny though in Chiang Mai passing schools with big signs saying “Learn Thai the Natural Way” which makes one wonder what on earth could be more natural than -you know- talking with people and do what they do.

How soon did you tackle reading and writing Thai?

After a month of “studying” at Chiang Mai University. I figured that it was essential to learn the Thai script and that I couldn’t ever learn Thai without it. The reason is that you can do a lot of studying by yourself without having to bother anyone. Grab a book and read it. Buy a magazine and read it. Walk outside and read what you see. I think as an adult it is important to learn to read/write Thai.

Did you find learning to read and write Thai difficult?

I thought it was quite easy to be quite frank. Writing Thai (or any language for that matter) is still pretty hard for me though as my hands aren’t used to holding a pen anymore. In other words; my handwriting is terrible and my hands hurt just by looking at a pen. Typing on the other hand…

What was your first ‘ah hah!’ moment?

When my wife started to talk Thai to me. More and more and more and more. I know this sounds quite silly but allow me to elaborate as I think a lot of Farangs in Thailand have had this particular issue. My wife, she always used to talk back in English which was quite frustrating (how am I ever going to learn oh the woes), but at some point in time -after hard work- she talked back in Thai. Maybe she gave in or maybe I just grew better in speaking and understanding Thai but this was my first ‘ah hah!’ moment. The other ah-hah moments are that I can just walk up to people, talk in Thai and having a conversation with confidence.

How do you learn languages?

Find all things fun and use that as a resource in learning the language! When I was a kid I used to read gaming magazines, cartoons and all that and I collected quite a few of these in Thailand. Still have to sort them out.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

My strengths are that I can เลียนแบบ the way a language sounds pretty well. I think I do have some sort of a feeling for that but my weakness is that I am pretty lazy. My other weakness is that I am not really wellspoken in the field of religion (my mother in law talks a lot about religion and I have a hard time keeping up) or professional Thai. I think what I have going for me is that when I find things fun or interesting I learn fast.

What is the biggest misconception for students learning Thai?

That it’s too hard. Unfortunately it’s not only the หรั่ง’s saying that but also the Thai people themselves. It’s too hard and a foreigner will never get it. If I can do it (and let me tell you this; I’m a pretty average Joe) everyone can do it!

Can you make your way around any other languages?

Yeah, my native language is Dutch, I think I am okay in English too and my German is pretty good. I was lucky to live close to German borders. Real Dutch people do have some issues understanding me because of my southern dialect which is an odd mix between Dutch, German and Belgian I guess.

Were you learning another language at the same time as Thai?

I tried some but never really gotten into it the same way as the Thai Language. So it was a hit and miss.

What advice would you give to students of the Thai language?

Don’t feel frustrated about all the stuff you say wrong but laugh about it. Don’t be too hard on yourself. I know we all have this dream of sounding exactly like a Thai or like the famous Farangs who speak Thai but take your sweet time for it. The more you laugh about your mistakes, the more fun you have, the less frustrated you will be and the faster and more you’ll learn!

Maarten Tummers,
Obsidian Photography

The Series: Interviewing Successful Thai Language Learners…

If you are a successful Thai language learner and would like to share your experiences, please contact me. I’d love to hear from you.

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WINNERS: Talking Thai-Eng-Thai Dictionary, Thai-Eng-Thai Phrasebook, and Thai for Beginners

WINNERS: Thai Language Giveaway

WINNERS to WLT’s SECOND week of the Thai Language Giveaway…

Vote the Top 100 Language Learning Blogs 2015The first week of the WLT’s seven weeks of Thai Language Giveaways sure went by fast!

Chosen by Benjawan Becker, here are the winners of this week’s giveaway: Angela Savage, Tom Kolek, Richard, and Chris. Congrats!

If the winners would please send a message via my contact form I’ll get the codes to you right away. Please note that any codes not retrieved by next Wednesday will be given to the winner/s in waiting (already chosen).

A word from Chris and Benjawan…

We at Paiboon Publishing and Word-in-the-Hand are thrilled to hear from everybody. Congratulations to the winners. We are certain these apps will be helpful. Good luck with your Thai studies.

I would like to thank Chris Pirazzi (Word in the Hand) and Benjawan Becker (Paiboon Publishing) for gifting this rounds of prizes. And I’d especially like to thank them both for working so hard all these years to give us some of the top iOS apps on the market. Seriously, I couldn’t imagine what learning Thai would be like without them.

My thanks also goes to everyone who took the time to leave comments. And if you didn’t win anything this week please keep trying because there’s a lot more coming! To get a complete list of the prizes and schedule, read the first post in the series, Please Vote THAI and WIN! 2015: Top 100 Language Lovers Competition.

Good luck everyone, I hope you all go home with wonderful prizes!

WLTs 2015 Thai Language Giveaway…

Vote the Top 100 Language Learning Blogs 2015If you haven’t voted in the Language Lovers Competition yet, please do take the time. Thanks!

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WLTs Thai Language Giveaway: Paiboon Publishing & Word in the Hand

WLTs Thai Language Giveaway

Paiboon Publishing & Word in the Hand…

Vote the Top 100 Language Learning Blogs 2015As I mentioned in the previous post, Please Vote THAI and WIN! 2015: Top 100 Language Lovers Competition, for seven weeks (a week for each year WLT has been online) there will be giveaways by top movers and shakers in the learning Thai industry.

WLTs Thai Language GiveawayAnd what better way to kick it off than with three of my favourite Thai apps from Paiboon Publishing and Word in the Hand: The Talking Thai-Eng-Thai Dictionary, the Thai for Beginners course, and the Talking Thai-Eng-Thai Phrasebook (soon to be rolled into the dictionary).

Over the years, Benjawan Poomsan Becker (Paiboon Publishing) and Chris Pirazzi (Word in the Hand) have been incredibly generous to readers of WLT, gifting handfuls of apps whenever they’ve come out with a totally new app, or when they’ve updated an app. Thanks you two!

For WLT’s Thai Language Giveaway they are sponsoring FOUR EACH of the apps. Details below.

Talking Thai–Eng–Thai Dictionary…

Talking Thai–English–Thai Dictionary
Price: US$24.99
Version: 1.8
Seller: Paiboon Publishing and Word in the Hand
Updated: Oct 23, 2014 (major update coming)
Word count: 150,000+ entries
Audio: 100% native speaker
Thai script: Yes
Transliteration: Yes
Zoom/pinch: Yes
Font control: Yes
Help: Yes (extensive)
Requires iOS: 6.0 or later
Optimised for: iPhone 5, iPhone 6, and iPhone 6 Plus
Compatible with: iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch

WLT Review: English Thai iOS App Dictionaries: iPhone and iPad

Talking Thai–English–Thai Phrasebook…

Talking Thai–English–Thai Phrasebook
Price: US$14.99
Version: 1.9
Seller: Paiboon Publishing and Word in the Hand
Released: 06 April 2015
Word count: 12,000+
Audio: Native speaker (female)
Thai script: Yes
Transliteration: Yes
Turn off Transliteration: Yes
Zoom/pinch: No need
Font control: Yes
Help: Yes (amazing)
Requires iOS: 5.1.1 or later
Optimised for: iPhone 5, iPhone 6, and iPhone 6 Plus
Compatible with: iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch

WLT Review: Win a Talking Thai-English-Thai Phrasebook iOS App!

Thai for Beginners…

Thai for BeginnersThai for Beginners - Paiboon Publishing
Price: US$19.99
Version: 1.10 (major update coming)
Author: Dominique Mayrand ©2010 Benjawan Poomsan
Date: Nov 21, 2013
Internet connection required: No
Word count: 3,000+ words and phrases
Thai script: Yes
Tone tips: Yes
Zoom: Not needed
Sound: Yes, male and female
Quiz: Yes

WLT Review: Thai for Beginners iPhone App: Four Apps to Win

Rules for WLTs Thai Language Giveaway…

As with previous draws, I’ve kept the rules as simple as possible.

  • To be included in the draw, leave comments below.
  • Comment(s) need to add to the conversation (it really does matter).
  • Each relevant comment gets counted, so please do leave as many as you like!
  • If you don’t collect your prize within a week of the announcement, it will be given away to the next person in line.

I will not be responsible for choosing the winners so even if we are the best of buddies, don’t be shy, you too can win. Actually, you can win every week as there is no limit to how many prizes you can walk away with.

Important: If you already own any of the apps, please let us know in the comments so we can adjust the prizes.

The draw will run from this moment until the 3rd of June, 6am Thai time. As soon as I get word from Chris and Benjawan, I’ll announce the winners in the comments below.

Good luck everyone. And my thanks again to Chris and Benjawan for sponsoring these wonderful prizes!

Oh, and before I forget … if you haven’t voted in the Language Lovers Competition, please do. Cheers!

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WINNERS: Thai for Beginners iPhone iPad iPod App

Thai for Beginners iPhone iPad iPod App: Winners

The EIGHT winners of the Thai for Beginners iPad iPhone iPod App…

When I announced this draw there were six free apps. And now there are eight. We have Benjawan Becker from Paiboon Publishing to thank for both treats (and more). Thanks Benjawan, I know there will be many happy Thai language learners after this announcement.

Oh. If you arrived here fresh and don’t know what I’m on about, please read this post: Thai for Beginners iPhone iPad iPod App: Six Apps to Win.

But if you just want to see what the app does, then this review is a taster: Thai for Beginners iPhone App.

And if you want to see even more, then the products page at Paiboon Publishing should do you: Thai for Beginners iPhone App.

And now on to the eight winners of the iPad iPhone iPod App…

When Talen went to chose his Thai for Beginners iPhone App Winners he had his beautiful assistant Mun do the honours. I don’t have a beautiful assistant but I do have man around the house who agreed to stuck his fingers into a bowl filled with names. Sweet.

In the order the names appeared, a congrats from me goes to:

Emil
Reiner
Sage
Pei Shan
Jayne
Dana Ellis
John
Wopanese

Winners, please contact me asap so I can walk you through to your brand spanking new Thai for Beginners iPad iPhone iPod App. And again, congrats!

But wait. It’s not over…

For those who didn’t walk away with a free app, Josh from Learning Thai (My Story) will be launching a new giveaway. Soon. That’s right. Even more Thai language learners are being gifted with free Thai for Beginners iPad iPhone iPod Apps. Congrats!

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Thai for Beginners iPhone iPad iPod App: Six Apps to Win

Thai for Beginners  iPhone iPad iPod App: 6 Chances to Win

The Thai for Beginners iPad iPhone iPod App: Six Apps to Win…

I just love giving away free apps. This is my second Thai for Beginners app giveaway. You can read about the first giveaway (review included) here: Thai for Beginners iPhone App: Four Apps to Win.

As you can see, I was hoping the winners would come back to share their views on the app. I even made a wee request along those lines. But, as that didn’t happen (and I really really really want to hear from you) I’m going back to my old ways. A draw.

To be included in the draw please follow these simple rules:

  • You need to leave comment(s) below.
  • The comment(s) need to add to the conversation.

Each relevant comment gets counted, so go ahead and leave as many as you like.

The draw will run from now to Sunday the 17th, 8pm BKK time. At that time I will number the reasonable comments and run them through a randomizer. Or a hat. We’ll see. With winners in hand I’ll then post the results. Good luck!

Thai for Beginners iPad iPhone iPod app: Version 1.6…

Trust me, it’s a useful app. If you still need convincing you can read all about it at Paiboon Publishing or scan through the Thai for Beginners iPhone iPad iPod app wrap below:

Thai for Beginners  iPhone iPad iPod appThai for Beginners - Paiboon Publishing -  iPhone iPad iPod appThai for BeginnersThai for Beginners
Price: US$24.99
Author: Dominique Mayrand ©2010 Benjawan Poomsan
Date: July 5, 2011
Version: 1.6
iOS: Requires iOS 3.2 or later
Internet connection required: No
Word count: 3,000+ words and phrases
Thai script: Yes
Tone tips: Yes
Zoom: Not needed
Size: 48.1 Mb
Sound: Yes, male and female
Quiz: Yes

Thai for Beginners iPhone App – Product Page: One of the most popular books for learning the Thai language is now available as an iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch app. Paiboon Publishing again sets the standard for learning the Thai language by bringing Thai for Beginners to the mobile platform.

Key Features:

  • This app teaches you the language skills of speaking, listening and reading Thai.
  • The lessons follow the format of the Thai for Beginners book, but a real Thai male and female voice speak the over 3,000 words and phrases, alternating between male and female pronunciations.
  • Hear a phrase over and over until you can say it correctly. Just click on it.
  • Provides examples of the five tones in Thai: low, falling, high, middle and rising tone.
  • Test your ability to hear and understand Thai with the built-in interactive exercises. You can retake the exercises after studying and improve your score.
  • An advanced level feature allows you to turn off the automatic spoken word so you can test your ability to read the Thai script.
  • Contains many additional useful words and phrases not contained in the book.

Note: You can purchase the original book at your local bookstore (in BKK, obviously) or at Paiboon Publishing here: Thai for Beginners.

And if you are interested in the programming behind the apps, Chris Pirazzi (programmer extraordinaire at Slice of Thai and Word in the Hand) has an excellent post on the subject here: How Thai Language iPad Apps are Designed.

Good luck on the Thai for Beginners iPad iPhone iPod app draw!

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Chris Pirazzi: How Thai Language iPad Apps are Designed

Chris Pirazzi: How iPad Apps are Designed

Learning Thai via the iPad…

Like a gazillion other people I bought an iPad 2 as soon as they reached Thailand. Since my purchase I haven’t had a whole lot of time to play with my new toy. Apologies Scott! But I seriously intend to. Just as soon as I can clear room (which will be right about the time you are reading this).

In preparation for my review of all things learning Thai on the iPad 2 I loaded it down with every Thai language app made for both the iPad and the iPhone. Poking around I noticed that some of the Thai learning apps sit tiny in the middle of the screen and others, like Benjawan and Chris’ fabulous Talking Thai-English-Thai Dictionary fit beautifully. The tiny apps can be enlarged but they look awful. Tacky even.

Whenever I want to know something technical that has to do with the learning Thai industry I ask programmer Chris Pirazzi. If Chris has time free he explains what’s happening. And when he has more time he shares the details in a post such as his Backstage View into the Process of Creating a Thai Dictionary. So just like before, I contacted Chris when I noticed the iPad weirdness and he obliged. Thanks Chris!

Now over to Chris…

Chris Pirazzi: How iPad Apps are Designed…

Apple’s mobile devices (iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad) use an operating system called iOS. When iOS developers write an app for iPhone and iPod Touch, they tell the operating system where to position the buttons, text, images, and other objects used by their app, always assuming that the screen resolution is 320×480 pixels as it is on those devices.

But the iPad screen resolution is 768×1024 pixels. So when the iPad came out, Apple had a bit of a dilemma. It isn’t possible for Apple’s iOS to magically guess how to move the developer’s objects around on the screen and still maintain a usable UI on the iPad, because iOS knows nothing about the specifics of each app. So instead, Apple punted on the problem and just made it so that when you run an iPhone-only app on iPad, iOS simply turns your iPad into a giant iPhone with blown-up (fuzzy) pixels.

Apple could not do anything to “sharpen” those pixels because many iPhone apps (such as games) rely on having exact control over every pixel on the screen. If iOS attempted to “sharpen” the pixels, it would make many games and other apps unusable. So the best Apple could do was to make every 1 pixel on the iPhone into a 2×2 square of pixels on the iPad. This makes the fuzziness.

When developers write or re-write their app to support iPad natively, as we did from the very beginning with our Talking Thai-English-Thai Dictionary for iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch, they use some special functionality that Apple added in iOS 3.2 to check the current resolution of the device and lay out all their application objects appropriately, using the full resolution of the device (320×480 or 768×1024) and with the full crispness allowed by the device. iOS then recognizes that the app supports iPad natively and doesn’t play the fuzzy games described above.

Paiboon Publishing has developed a native iPad version of the Thai for Beginners software as well, allowing crisper text and full use of the iPad screen.

Chris Pirazzi,
Slice-of-Thai.com | Word in the Hand

Chris Pirazzi on WLT:
Backstage View into the Process of Creating a Thai Dictionary
Successful Thai Language Learner: Chris Pirazzi
Chris Pirazzi at Slice-of-thai.com
Chris Pirazzi Updates Slice-of-Thai.com

Thai for Beginners on iPad…

Thai for BeginnersThai for Beginners - Paiboon Publishing
Price: US$24.99
Author: Dominique Mayrand ©2010 Benjawan Poomsan
Date: June 20, 2011
Version: 1.5
Internet connection required: No
Word count: 3,000+ words and phrases
Thai script: Yes
Tone tips: Yes
Zoom: Not needed
Sound: Yes, male and female
Quiz: Yes

Description: Paiboon Publishing’s new iPhone app makes is easy to study your Thai lessons wherever you go with your iPhone or iPod Touch. The lessons follow the format of Benjawan Becker’s best selling Thai for Beginners book but also includes hundreds of commonly used phrases. And a real Thai person speaks each of the over 3,000 words or phrases. Test your ability to hear and understand Thai or test your knowledge of written Thai with the built in exercises. Hearing the spoken Thai will help you increase the speed of learning the language that no book alone can do.

I absolutely love the iPhone version of Thai for Beginners so I expected to feel the same about the iPad. And I do. And like I said, I’ll be reviewing all iPad 2 apps for learning Thai but as I already like what I see – two thumbs up (I’ll explain what I mean later) – the Thai for Beginners iPad app will be at the top of my review. Guaranteed.

Btw: If you’ve already purchased the iPhone app version of Thai for Beginners, or if you were one of four lucky winners, then you own the iPad version too.

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