A Woman Learning Thai...and some men too ;)

Learn Thai Language & Thai Culture

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Please and Thank You and Excuse Me: Part 3

The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation…

“Forgive-i-ness please”
The Japanese Yakusa chief bows and apologizes after he falls through
the Simpson’s kitchen window while fighting the Italian Mafia.
– The Simpsons, Season 8

Please and Thank You and Excuse Me…

It is interesting that many of the Thai words for excuse me have the same beginning as the Thai expressions for please, ขอ /kŏr/ – “to ask for”. With please we are asking for something or for someone to do something for us. With excuse me we are often asking for “forgiveness”, and in the most frequently used Thai form of excuse me or I’m sorry, we are literally asking for “punishment”.

ขอโทษ /kŏr tôht/ – “Please punish me”. The word โทษ /tôht/ means to “blame” or “accuse”. The phrase ทำโทษ /tam tôht/ means to punish. But in everyday usage ขอโทษ /kŏr tôht/ simply means “Excuse me”.

For just about any situation you would use Excuse me in English you can usually use ขอโทษ /kŏr tôht/ in Thai. For 95% of apologies in Thai ขอโทษ /kŏr tôht/ will suffice.

When you bump into someone:

ขอโทษ ครับ/ค่ะ
kŏr tôht · kráp/ká
Excuse me.

You ask permission to walk between two people (something that should be avoided in Thailand unless it is necessary to get to where you need to go):

ขอโทษ ครับ/ค่ะ ขอ ผ่าน หน่อย
kŏr tôht kráp/ká kŏr pàan nòi
Excuse me. Please allow me to pass.

As an opener when asking someone a question:

ขอโทษ คุณ ชื่อ อะไร ครับ/คะ
kŏr tôht kun chêu a-rai kráp/ká
Excuse me, what is your name?

One use of this phrase is quintessential Thai. Very often someone who wants to be polite in referring to their feet or shoes, like “look at my news shoes”, “I stubbed my toe”, “my feet are sore”, will begin the sentence with ขอโทษ /kŏr tôht/ since the feet can be considered a rude topic of discussion (“excuse me for talking about my feet but …”)

You want to show your friend your broken toenail to get some sympathy:

ขอโทษ เล็บเท้า แตก, มัน เจ็บ มาก
kŏr tôht lép táo dtàek, man jèp mâak
My toenail is broken and it really hurts.

You show off your new shoes to a friend:

ขอโทษ จ้ะ, รองเท้า ใหม่ ของ ฉัน สวย ไหม
kŏr tôht jà, rong táo mài kŏng chăn sŭay măi
Do you think my new shoes are pretty?

The Thai phrase ขอโทษ /kŏr tôht/ is good for 95% of your excuse me’s, but for the 5% leftover, Thai has a number of different ways to say excuse me, I’m sorry, apologies, etc.

ขอ อภัย /kŏr a-pai/ – The word อภัย /a-pai/ means “pardon” or “forgiveness”. It is the root of the Thai phrases อภัยโทษ /a-pai tôht/ “to grant a pardon (legally)”, and ให้อภัย /hâi a-pai/ “to forgive”. It is not spoken often in Thai but you may see it on signs asking the public’s pardon.

ขอ อภัย กำลัง ก่อ สร้าง ถนน /kŏr a-pai gam-lang gòr sâang tà-nŏn/
Sorry for the inconvenience. Road under construction.

ขอ อนุญาต /kŏr a-nú-yâat/ – The word อนุญาต means to allow” or “give permission”. Not exactly an excuse me but using it is the equivalent to saying “pardon me, please allow me to…”

ขอโทษค่ะ ขอ(อนุญาต) จ่าย บิล ค่ะ
kŏr tôht kâ kŏr (a-nú-yâat) jàai bin kâ
Pardon, please allow me to pay the bill.

โทษ /tôht/ – As with so many Thai phrases, in certain informal situations you can revert to a contraction. In this case just leave out the ขอ /kŏr/.

โทษ ครับ/ค่ะ คุณ ทำ กระเป๋า ตก
tôht kráp/ká kun tam grà-bpăo dtòk
Excuse me. You dropped your bag.

ขอโทษ ที /kŏr tôht tee/ – And sometimes for a little added lyricism you can add a little ที.

ขอโทษ(ที) ผม ช้า ไป หน่อย
kŏr tôht (tee) pŏm cháa bpai nòi
Sorry I am a little late.

ขอโทษ ด้วย /kŏr tôht dûay/ – Similar to ที่ you can add the word ดว้ย.

ขอโทษ ด้วย ไม่ เห็น คุณ
kŏr tôht dûay mâi hĕn kun
Sorry, I didn’t see you.

โทษ ที่ /tôht têe/; โทษ ด้วย /tôht dûay/ – Or you can contract and add at the same time.

โทษ ที่ ทำ น้ำ หก (โทษ ด้วย น้ำ หก)
tôht têe tam nám hòk (tôht dûay nám hòk)
Sorry for spilling the water.

Very formal excuse me:

ประทานโทษ /bprà-taan tôht/ – The word ประทาน is a synonym of ขอ /kŏr/ in that they both mean “to ask for”. But whereas ขอ /kŏr/ is an everyday word ประทาน is one of those super formal words.

ประทาน โทษ ท่าน ผู้ว่า
bprà-taan tôht tâan pôo wâa
Pardon me governor.

ขอประทานโทษ /kŏr bprà-taan tôht/ – And we can make it even more formal by adding the ขอ /kŏr/ in front.

ขอ ประทาน โทษ ท่าน ผู้ว่า
kŏr bprà-taan tôht tâan pôo wâa
I beg your pardon governor sir.

Note: The word เสียใจ /sĭa jai/ means to be “sorry” but it is not the excuse me type of sorry but the “I feel bad for your loss” kind of sorry, and is not used in in asking for pardon.

Legal Pardon:

Another kind of “pardon” is the legal kind which exonerates someone who has been convicted of a crime. There are two kinds of pardons in Thailand.

อภัยโทษ /a-pai tôht/ – “forgive punishment”, a regular pardon.

พระราชทาน อภัยโทษ /prá râat taan a-pai tôht/ – You see the prefix พระราชทาน and you know it means “Royal”. Here it means “a royal pardon”. Often on his majesty the King’s birthday, royal pardons will be given to a number of prisoners. BTW, for those who have told you that Thai is a one-syllable-per-word language, you can ask them about this one.

Implied I’m sorry:

ไม่ได้ ตั้งใจ /mâi dâai dtâng jai/ – “did not do it on purpose”. ตั้งใจ means “intention”. In order to save face on the golf course, whenever I hit a tree and the ball luckily bounces right back onto the fairway I say ผม ตั้งใจทำ “I meant to do that.” The word เจตนา also means “intention”. Usually when we say we “didn’t mean” to do something, or “didn’t do it intentionally” there is an implied I’m sorry that goes along with that.

ผม ไม่ได้ ทำ โดยเจตนา
pŏm mâi dâai tam doi jàyt-dtà-naa

Or less formal:

ผม ไม่ได้ โดย เจตนา ทำ
pŏm mâi dâai jàyt-dtà-naa tam
I didn’t do that on purpose.

ผม ไม่ ทำ โดย เจตนา
pŏm mâi tam doi jàyt-dtà-naa
I didn’t do that intentionally.

I’m not sorry because…

แก้ ตัว /gâe dtua/ – Means “to make an excuse”. It is sort of the opposite of asking someone’s forgiveness by giving an excuse for doing what you did.

เขา แก้ ตัว ว่า ไม่ได้ ตั้ง ใจ (ทำ)
kăo gâe dtua wâa mâi dâai dtâng jai (tam)
He made the excuse saying that he didn’t mean (to do it).

Dictionary words:

ขอสมา /kŏr sà-maa/; ขอขมา /kŏr kà-măa/ both mean “to apologize”. These are what I refer to as dictionary words. If you look up “apologize” in the dictionary, a good one, you may come up with these. Otherwise you will probably never hear them in normal conversation.

Vocabulary used in this chapter…

กระเป๋า /grà-bpăo/ bag
ก่อสร้าง /gòr sâang/ construction
กำลัง /gam-lang/ makes a verb into a gerund (-ing)
จ่าย /jàai/ to pay
เจ็บ /jèp/ to hurt
ช้า /cháa/ slow, late
ชื่อ /chêu/ name
ตก /dtòk/ to fall, drop
แตก /dtàek/ cracked
ถนน /tà-nŏn/ street, road
ทำ /tam/ to do, make happen
เท้า /táo/ foot
น้ำ /nám/ water
บิล /bin/ bill (English loan word)
ผ่าน /pàan/ to pass
ผู้ว่า /pôo wâa/ abbre. for governor
รองเท้า /rong táo/ shoe
เล็บเท้า /lép táo/ toenail
สวย /sŭay/ beautiful
หก /hòk/ to spill
เห็น /hĕn/ to see
ใหม่ /mài/ new
อะไร /a-rai/ what

Examples of Thai excuse me in sentences…

ขอโทษ ครับ/ค่ะ
kŏr tôht · kráp/ká

ขอโทษ ครับ/ค่ะ ขอ ผ่าน หน่อย
kŏr tôht kráp/ká kŏr pàan nòi

ขอโทษ คุณ ชื่อ อะไร ครับ/ค่ะ
kŏr tôht kun chêu a-rai kráp/ká

ขอโทษ เล็บเท้า แตก, มัน เจ็บ มาก
kŏr tôht lép táo dtàek, man jèp mâak

ขอโทษ จ้ะ, รองเท้า ใหม่ ของ ฉัน สวย ไหม
kŏr tôht jà, rong táo mài kŏng chăn sŭay măi

ขอ อภัย กำลัง ก่อสร้าง ถนน
kŏr a-pai gam-lang gòr sâang tà-nŏn

ขอโทษ ค่ะ ขอ(อนุญาต) จ่าย บิล ค่ะ
kŏr tôht ká kŏr (a-nú-yâat) jàai bin ká

โทษ ครับ/ค่ะ คุณ ทำ กระเป๋า ตก
tôht kráp/ká kun tam grà-bpăo dtòk

ขอโทษ(ที่) ผม มา ช้า ไป หน่อย
kŏr tôht (têe) pŏm maa cháa bpai nòi

ขอโทษ ด้วย ไม่ เห็น คุณ
kŏr tôht dûay mâi hĕn kun

โทษ ที่ ทำ น้ำ หก (โทษ ด้วย น้ำ หก)
tôht têe tam nám hòk (tôht dûay nám hòk)

ประทานโทษ ท่าน ผู้ว่า
bprà-taan tôht tâan pôo wâa

ขอประทานโทษ ท่าน ผู้ว่า
kŏr bprà-taan tôht tâan pôo wâa

ผม ไม่ได้ ตั้ง ใจ ทำ
pŏm mâi dâai dtâng jai tam

ผม ไม่ได้ ทำ โดยเจตนา
pŏm mâi dâai tam doi jàyt-dtà-naa

ผม ไม่ได้ เจตนา ทำ
pŏm mâi dâai jàyt-dtà-naa tam

เขา แก ตั้ว ว่า ไม่ได้ ตั้ง ใจ (ทำ)
kăo gâe dtua wâa mâi dâai dtâng jai (tam)

Audio and Pdf Downloads…

Docx download (with transliteration): Thank You – Part 3
Docx download (sans transliteration): Thank You – Part 3
Audio download: Thank You – Part 3 Audio

Share Button
The following two tabs change content below.
Hugh Leong loves explaining things. And during his 40 plus years of trying to learn Thai and its culture, he learned to love the cross-cultural aspect of living in a foreign country and speaking its language. His series, Thai Language Thai Culture, covers various aspects of learning Thai, and how the Thai culture influences how we say things.

3 Comments

  1. I’ve the feeling there’s a mix up between โทษที and โทษที่ or the difference is not really clearly explained.
    “Similar to ที่ you can add the word ดว้ย”. Do you mean ที ?
    The example in the text says :
    ขอโทษ(ที) ผม ช้า ไป หน่อย
    While the audio below says:
    ขอโทษที่ ผม ช้า ไป หน่อย
    These are 2 different constructions …. (both correct, but not the same).

  2. Kris,

    I am very impressed by my readers ability to find my tone market mistakes. There have been a few others. Let’s call them typos. BTW, I read Thai fluently but am a terrible writer of Thai, so I do make mistakes and am happy when people find them. Interestingly enough, I say all these things correctly and these posts have a strong emphasis on spoken Thai. (thus the name “The Ten eEssentials of Thai Conversation’0.

    I am hoping to make all these spelling corrections when I eventually put the eBook together.

    But, that is why we have a native Thai speaker making the audio recordings. I would say that those should be the ones to follow. Khun Pairot, who has done such excellent work on the recordings gets it right, even when I make spelling errors, and I am very thankful for her.

  3. ขอโทษที่(+reason) and ขอโทษที are both correct and often used, but have a different meaning. I think they should be both in the overview. So there are no real spelling mistakes, but it’s confusing …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

*