A Woman Learning Thai...and some men too ;)

Learn Thai Language & Thai Culture

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Thai Personal Pronouns

The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation…

She loves you, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
-The Beatles, She Loves You

The topic of Thai pronouns can be a daunting one. We will try to work with the basics here, just scratching the surface, while giving a taste of how very wide ranging this topic can be. But when it comes to learning Thai personal pronouns, especially compared to English pronouns, there is some good news, and some bad news.

Sorry but it is necessary to talk just a little grammar here.

With English pronouns we have what are called the nominative case and the objective case. One pronoun acts like the subject of a sentence, and the other acts like the object.

Here is what we are talking about.

English pronouns:

I/Me
We/Us
They/Them
He/Him
She/Her
Who/Whom
You

And here is how they are different:

I saw the cat. The cat saw me.
We paid for the dinner. He paid for us.
He ate the shark. They shark ate him.
She cooked the fish. The fish was cooked by her.
Who sent the letter? To whom would you like to send a letter?
You did something. Something was done to you (the grammar gods felt a little compassion for us by giving us just one).

The nominative case pronoun does stuff. The objective case pronoun gets stuff done to it (often with the help of a preposition like “to”, “for”, “by”, etc.).

Okay, English grammar lesson is over.

The good news.

The Thai language doesn’t have two pronouns for each person. They don’t break down into nominative and objective cases. So, you only have to learn one pronoun case for each person. Thanks for little victories.

The bad news.

I have counted least 27 different words for “I” in Thai, plus lots of other ways to refer to yourself. “You” is a little better with only a dozen words or so. All the rest are just as bad.

Thai Pronouns:

Lots of words like “uncle”, “auntie”, “big brother”, “teacher”, “sir”, “boss”, etc., although grammatically common nouns, are also used as pronouns ( for I, you, he, she, etc., etc.) There are countless of these and we look at some but will not be able to give examples of all of them.

We will give the most common and easy to use pronouns with examples. We will also give some other ways to say the same pronouns.

As with so much in the Thai language, the choice of words we use is dependent on who is talking to whom.

It is best to listen for all these other pronouns in Thai people’s normal conversations and learn how they are used and with whom, and in what situations. Later when you are sure of the relationship and the situation you can try some of these out in your own conversations. But be prepared for a few normal faux pas along the way.

The Null Pronoun:

After you have learned the many pronouns here, be aware that Thais in conversation can simply just leave out pronouns. The context of the sentence will tell them who is doing and whom it is being done to.

Examples:

จะไปตลาด
jà bpai dtà-làat
Going to the market.
(someone is going to the market)

จะซื้อให้
jà séu hâi
Will buy it for …
(someone is buying something for someone)

The Thais will know who and whom, and so will you after a while.

But let’s start with the simple stuff.

ผม, ดิฉัน, ฉัน /pŏm, dì-chăn, chăn/ – “I/Me”:

These three “I/Me” pronouns are the ones that we probably use most. They are basic and will allow you to say just about anything in referring to yourself.

ผม /pŏm/ – used by male speakers:

When a man is speaking.

ผม เห็น สมบัติ ที่ ตลาด
pŏm hĕn sŏm-bàt têe dtà-làat
I saw Sombat at the market.

มาลี คุย กับ ผม ที่ ห้างสรรพสินค้า
maa-lee kui gàp pŏm têe hâang sàp sĭn káa
Malee spoke with me at the shopping mall.

ผม จะ เล่น เปีย โน
pŏm jà lên bpia noh
I’m going to play the piano.

ครู ให้ ผม “A” ใน ทดสอบ
kroo hâi pŏm “A” nai tót sòp
The teacher gave me an “A” on the test.

Note: The word ผม /pŏm/ can sometimes be seen as a bit formal. If you are talking to a close friend you might want to use one of the “other ways to refer to yourself” discussed below.

ดิฉัน (ดีฉัน) /dì-chăn/ – used by female speakers:

When a woman is talking (in a fairly formal setting)

ดิฉัน จะ แต่งงาน กับ คุณ ปรีชา
dì-chăn jà dtàeng ngaan gàp kun bpree-chaa
I’m going to marry Preecha.

คุณ ปรีชา จะ แต่งงาน กับ ดิฉัน
kun bpree-chaa jà dtàeng ngaan gàp dì-chăn
Preecha is going to marry me.

อยาก ไป ช้อปปิ้ง กับ ดิฉัน ไหม
yàak bpai chóp-bpîng gàp dì-chăn măi
Would you like to go shopping with me?

ดิฉัน เคย ทาน อาหาร กลางวัน ที่ ร้าน อาหาร ฝรั่งเศส
dì-chăn koie taan aa hăan glaang wan têe ráan aa hăan fà-ràng-sàyt
I have had lunch at that French restaurant.

Note: The word ดิฉัน is quite formal. If you are talking to people you know, of the same social status, or lower, you can use ฉัน or you might want to use one of the “other ways to refer to yourself” discussed below.

ฉัน /chăn/ – used by females in an informal setting—also used by males with intimate friends or paramours:

You can substitute ฉัน in any of the above mentioned sentences instead of ผม and ดิฉัน if the situation is informal and you are talking with friends.

ฉัน จะ ซื้อ รถ ใหม่
chăn jà séu rót mài
I’m going to buy a new car.

สุมาลี ซื้อ อาหารกลางวัน ให้ ฉัน
sù maa-lee séu aa-hăan glaang-wan hâi chăn
Sumalee bought me lunch.

คุณ อยาก จะ ไป ดู หนัง กับ ฉัน ไหม
kun yàak jà bpai doo năng gàp chăn măi
Do you want to go to the movies with me?

ฉัน สอบ ได้
chăn sòp dâai
I passed the test.

เมื่อวาน สุขใจ โทร หา ฉัน
mêua waan sùk-kà-jai toh hăa chăn
Yesterday Sukjai called me (on the phone).

And then you can have more intimate conversations:

ฉัน รัก เธอ
chăn rák ter
I love you.

Using your own name:

Often using the above three words for “I” might sound a bit distant. When a person, especially a woman but not exclusively, wants to sound a bit more familiar he/she can use their own name as a pronoun for “I”.

น้อย รัก แดง
nói rák daeng
Literally: “Noi loves Dang” but really means “I love you.”

Some other ways to say “I”:

  • พี่ /pêe/ – literally “older” brother or sister but is often used as “I” informally when you are older than the person you are talking to.
  • น้อง /nóng/ – literally “younger” brother or sister but is often used as “I” informally when you are younger than the person you are talking to.
  • หนู /nŏo/ – Usually used by women when a they are much younger than the person they are talking to.
  • เค้า /káo/ – very informal when speaking to a close friend. เค้า / káo / is the “I” paired with ตัว / dtua / for “you”

And then there’s…

ข้าพเจ้า /kâa-pá-jâo/ – when writing or speaking formally
ข้า, ข้าเจ้า /kâa, kâa jâo/ – abbreviation for ข้าพเจ้า
เจ้า /jâo/ – poetic
หม่อมฉัน /mòm chăn/ – used when speaking to royalty
อาตมา /àat-maa/ – used by monks
กู /goo/ – old form, today considered overly familiar, except with close friends
ข้าพระพุทธเจ้า /kâa prá-pút-tá-jâo/ – highly formal
ลูกช้าง /lôok cháang/ – your humble servant 
อิฉัน /i-chăn/ – female speakers in a formal setting
อาตมภาพ /aa dtom pâap/ – used by a monk
อัญขยม /an-yá-kà-yŏm/ – poetic 

คุณ, เธอ /kun, ter/ – “You”:

Although there are many other ways to say “you”, these two are the most popular. The pronoun คุณ /kun/ can be used for just about anyone whereas เธอ /ter/ is usually reserved for close acquaintances or very young ones.

คุณ /kun/

คุณ จะ ไป ไหน
kun jà bpai năi
Where are you going?

ใคร จะ ไป กับ คุณ
krai jà bpai gàp kun
Who is going with you?

คุณ กำลัง ใช้ อินเทอร์เน็ต หรือ เปล่า
kun gam-lang chái in-têr-nét rĕu bplào
Are you using the Internet?

ผม จะ พา คุณ กลับ บ้าน
pŏm jà paa kun glàp bâan
I will take you home.

Note on คุณ /kun/

You find คุณ /kun/ in many places. Besides meaning “you” as we do here, it is part of thank you (ขอบคุณ /kòp kun/), and it is also used as an honorific in front of a person’s name with the meaning of Mr. or Mrs./Miz. It is usually used with a person’s first name.

It is also used as a title for a woman (as in Lady …) in the term คุณหญิง /kun yĭng/, and คุณ /kun/ by itself was at one time a semi royal title.

Unless you are quite close to someone, when using their name we usually add an honorific like Mr., Prof., Older Brother, Auntie, etc. and คุณ / kun / is the most ubiquitous.

CAVEAT: When we want to talk about ourselves we never use the honorific คุณ /kun/. We would never say “my name is คุณ /kun/ Hugh”. I can say I am Uncle Hugh, or Teacher Hugh, or Big Brother Hugh, but never “I am Mr. Hugh.” Others will say it for you but you don’t say it for yourself.

เธอ /ter/

เธอ จะ ชอบ หนัง (เรื่องนี้)
ter jà chôp năng (rêuang née)
You would like the movie.

เพื่อน ของ เธอ ต้องการ ให้ เธอ ร้อง เพลง
pêuan kŏng ter dtông gaan hâi ter róng playng
Your friends wanted you to sing (a song).

เธอ จะ กิน ก๋วยเตี๋ยว วันนี้ ไหม
ter jà gìn gŭay-dtĭeow wan née măi
Will you have noodles today?

ฉัน ใช้ คอม ของ เธอ ได้ ไหม
chăn chái kom kŏng ter dâai măi
Can I use your computer?

Using the person’s name:

When a person wants to sound a bit more familiar he/she can use a person’s name as a pronoun for “you”.

If someone says to you น้อย รัก แดง /nói rák daeng/
(as above) you can answer with:

แดง ก็ รัก น้อย
daeng gôr rák nói
Literally: “Dang loves Noi also” but really means “I love you too.”

Some other ways to say “you”:

  • ท่าน /tâan/ – when speaking to someone with a very high status
  • นาย /naai/ – when speaking to someone of a higher status. The equivalent of “sir” or “boss”.
  • หนู /nŏo/ – used when the person you are talking to is much younger than you are.
  • พี่ /pêe/ – literally “older” brother or sister but is often used as “you” informally for someone older.
  • (คุณ) ลุง /(kun) lung/ – literally “uncle” but is often used as “you” informally for someone much older, possible the age of your father.
  • น้อง /nóng/ – literally “younger” brother or sister but is often used as “you” informally for someone younger
  • (คุณ) ป้า /(kun) bpâa/ – literally “auntie” but is often used as “you” informally for someone much older, possible the age of your mother.
  • แก /gae/ – impolite or colloquial usage
  • ตัว /dtua/ – very informal when speaking to a close friend. เค้า /káo/ is the “I” paired with ตัว /dtua/ for “you”.

Now that the biggies (I and You) are dealt with (albeit just scratching the surface), let’s stick with one Thai pronoun for each of the following (although there are many Thai words for each).

เรา /rao/ – “We/Us” (พวกเรา /pûak rao/ is a synonym for we/us, all of us):

เรา จะ ทาน อาหารกลางวัน ด้วยกัน
rao jà taan aa-hăan glaang-wan dûay gan
We’ll have lunch together.

มาลี เอา ผัก ให้ เรา
maa-lee ao pàk hâi rao
Malee gave the vegetables to us.

เรา ทุกคน เล่น ฟุตบอล
rao túk kon lên fút bon
We all played football.

คุณ ครู จะ สอน เรา วันเสาร์
kun-kroo jà sŏn rao wan săo
The teacher will teach us on Saturday.

เขา /kăo/ “He/She”, often เธอ /ter/ is also used for “She”:

เขา (เธอ) มา เร็ว เสมอ
kăo (ter) maa reo sà-mĕr
She always comes early.

เขา (เธอ) จะ เอา พริก ไหม
kăo (ter) jà ao prík măi
Does he want any chilis?

ให้ โทรศัพท์มือถือ ใหม่(แก่) เธอ
hâi toh-rá-sàp meu tĕu mài (gàe) ter
Give her the new cell phone.

บอก เขา (เธอ) ว่า บ้าน คุณ อยู่ ที่ ไหน
bòk kăo (ter) wâa bâan kun yòo têe năi
Tell him where your house is.

พวกเขา /pûak kăo/ or เขา /kăo/ (for short) – “They/Them”:

The word เขา /kăo/ can mean “he/she/they” but if we use the word พวกเขา /pûak kăo/ (พวก /pûak/ = “group of …”) then we know that it is a plural form so should be translated as “they”.

พวกเขา มา เร็ว เสมอ
pûak kăo maa reo sà-mĕr
They always come early.

พวกเขา จะ เอา พริก ไหม
pûak kăo jà ao prík măi
Do they want any chilis.

ให้ โทรศัพท์มือถืออัน ใหม่ (แก่) พวกเขา
hâi toh-rá-sàp meu tĕu mài (gàe) pûak kăo
Give them new cell phones.

บอก พวกเขา ว่า บ้าน คุณ อยู่ ที่ ไหน
bòk pûak kăo wâa bâan kun yòo têe năi
Tell them where your house is.

Extra Credit:

Here are some sentences using the “other” words that Thais use as pronouns.

ลุง ต้องการ น้ำ เย็น
lung dtông gaan nám yen
Lit: Uncle needs cold water. “I would like some cold water.”

คุณป้า เอา น้ำ เย็น ไหม
kun-bpâa ao nám yen măi
Lit: Does auntie want some cold water? “Would you like some cold water?”

เมื่อไร พี่ จะ มา
mêua rai pêe jà maa
Lit: When is older sister coming? “When are you coming?” or “When is she coming?” or “When are you coming?”

ครู จะ ช่วย หนู
kroo jà chûay nŏo
Lit: The teacher will help the mouse. “I will help you.” or “She will help her.” or “He will help me.”, etc.

นาย จะ ตี กอล์ฟ พรุ่งนี้ ไหม
naai jà dtee góf prûng-née măi
Lit: Will sir (boss) play golf tomorrow? “Will you play golf tomorrow?

ช่วย พี่ หน่อย
chûay pêe nòi
Lit: Please help older brother. “Please help me.” or “Please help him.”, etc.

เค้า กับ ตัว จะ ไป ด้วยกัน
káo gàp dtua jà bpai dûay gan
Lit: He and body will go together. “You and I will go together.”

พี่ จะ เลี้ยง น้อง
pêe jà líang nóng
Lit: Older brother will pay for younger sister. “I’ll pay for you.” or “You will pay for me.” or “She will pay for you”, etc.

Vocabulary used in this post…

กลับ /glàp/ to return
ก๋วยเตี๋ยว /gŭay-dtĭeow/ noodle soup
คอม /kom/ abbre: for computer
คุย /kui/ to talk
ช้อปปิ้ง /chóp-bpîng/ loan word: shopping
ซื้อ /séu/ to buy
ด้วยกัน /dûay gan/ together
ดู หนัง /doo năng/ to watch a movie
ตลาด /dtà-làat/ market
ตี กอล์ฟ /dtee góf/ play golf
แต่งงาน /dtàeng ngaan/ to marry
ทดสอบ /tót sòp/ test, examination
ทุกคน /túk kon/ everyone
โทร /toh/ to call (telephone)
โทรศัพท์ /toh-rá-sàp/ telephone
โทรศัพท์ มือถือ /toh-rá-sàp meu tĕu/ cell phone
เปีย โน / bpia noh/ loan word: piano
ผัก /pàk/ vegetable
พริก /prík/ chili
พรุ่งนี้ /prûng-née/ tomorrow
ฟุตบอล /fút bon/ loan word: football
มือถือ /meu tĕu/ cell phone (hand held)
เมื่อวาน /mêua waan/ yesterday
รถ /rót/ vehicle, car, motorcycle
ร้อง เพลง /róng playng/ to sing (a song)
รัก /rák/ to love
เร็ว /reo/ fast, early
เล่น /lên/ to play
เลี้ยง /líang/ to pay for
วันนี้ /wan née/ today
วันเสาร์ / wan săo/ Saturday
สอน /sŏn/ to teach
สอบ ได้ /sòp dâai to/ pass a test
เสมอ /sà-mĕr/ always
ห้างสรรพสินค้า /hâang sàp sĭn káa/ shopping mall (center)
ใหม่ /mài/ new
อาหารกลางวัน /aa-hăan glaang-wan/ lunch
อินเทอร์เน็ต /in-têr-nét/ Internet

Examples of Thai Pronouns sentences…

จะไปตลาด
jà bpai dtà-làat

จะซื้อให้
jà séu hâi

ผม เห็น สมบัติ ที่ ตลาด
pŏm hĕn sŏm-bàt têe dtà-làat

มาลี คุย กับ ผม ที่ ห้างสรรพสินค้า
maa-lee kui gàp pŏm têe hâang sàp sĭn káa

ผม จะ เล่น เปีย โน
pŏm jà lên bpia noh

ครู ให้ ผม “A” ใน ทดสอบ
kroo hâi pŏm “A” nai tót sòp 

ดิฉัน จะ แต่งงาน กับ คุณ ปรีชา
dì-chăn jà dtàeng ngaan gàp kun bpree-chaa

คุณ ปรีชา จะ แต่งงาน กับ ดิฉัน
kun bpree-chaa jà dtàeng ngaan gàp dì-chăn

อยาก ไป ช้อปปิ้ง กับ ดิฉัน ไหม
yàak bpai chóp-bpîng gàp dì-chăn măi

ดิฉัน เคย ทาน อาหาร กลางวัน ที่ ร้าน อาหาร ฝรั่งเศส
dì-chăn koie taan aa hăan glaang wan têe ráan aa hăan fà-ràng-sàyt

ฉัน จะ ซื้อ รถ ใหม่
chăn jà séu rót mài

สุมาลี ซื้อ อาหารกลางวัน ให้ ฉัน
sù maa-lee séu aa-hăan glaang-wan hâi chăn

คุณ อยาก จะ ไป ดู หนัง กับ ฉัน ไหม
kun yàak jà bpai doo năng gàp chăn măi

ฉัน สอบ ได้
chăn sòp dâai

เมื่อวาน สุขใจ โทร หา ฉัน
mêua waan sùk-kà-jai toh hăa chăn

ฉัน รัก เธอ
chăn rák ter

น้อย รัก แดง
nói rák daeng

คุณ จะ ไป ไหน
kun jà bpai năi

ใคร จะ ไป กับ คุณ?
krai jà bpai gàp kun

คุณ กำลัง ใช้ อินเทอร์เน็ต หรือ เปล่า
kun gam-lang chái in-têr-nét rĕu bplào

ผม จะ พา คุณ กลับ บ้าน
pŏm jà paa kun glàp bâan

เธอ จะ ชอบ หนัง (เรื่องนี้)
ter jà chôp năng (rêuang née)

เพื่อน ของ เธอ ต้องการ ให้ เธอ ร้อง เพลง
pêuan kŏng ter dtông gaan hâi ter róng playng

เธอ จะ กิน ก๋วยเตี๋ยว วันนี้ ไหม
ter jà gìน gŭay-dtĭeow wan née măi

ฉัน ใช้ คอม ของ เธอ ได้ ไหม
chăn chái kom kŏng ter dâai măi

แดง ก็ รัก น้อย
daeng gôr rák nói

เรา จะ ทาน อาหารกลางวัน ด้วยกัน
rao jà taan aa-hăan glaang-wan dûay gan

มาลี เอา ผัก ให้ เรา
maa-lee ao pàk hâi rao

เรา ทุกคน เล่น ฟุตบอล
rao túk kon lên fút bon

คุณ ครู จะ สอน เรา วันเสาร์
kun-kroo jà sŏn rao wan săo

เขา (เธอ) มา เร็ว เสมอ
kăo (ter) maa reo sà-mĕr

เขา (เธอ) จะ เอา พริก ไหม
kăo (ter) jà ao prík măi

บอก เขา (เธอ) ว่า บ้าน คุณ อยู่ ที่ ไหน
bòk kăo (ter) wâa bâan kun yòo têe năi

พวกเขา มา เร็ว เสมอ
pûak kăo maa reo sà-mĕr

พวกเขา จะ เอา พริก ไหม
pûak kăo jà ao prík măi

ให้ โทรศัพท์มือถืออัน ใหม่ (แก่) พวกเขา
hâi toh-rá-sàp meu tĕu an mài (gàe) pûak kăo

บอก พวกเขา ว่า บ้าน คุณ อยู่ ที่ ไหน
bòk pûak kăo wâa bâan kun yòo têe năi

ลุง ต้องการ น้ำ เย็น
lung dtông gaan nám yen

เมื่อไร พี่ จะ มา
mêua rai pêe jà maa

ครู จะ ช่วย หนู
kroo jà chûay nŏo

นาย จะ ตี กอล์ฟ พรุ่งนี้ ไหม
naai jà dtee góf prûng-née măi

ช่วย พี่ หน่อย
chûay pêe nòi

เค้า กับ ตัว จะ ไป ด้วยกัน
káo gàp dtua jà bpai dûay gan

พี่ จะ เลี้ยง น้อง
pêe jà líang nóng

Audio and Pdf Downloads…

Docx download (with transliteration): Pronouns
Docx download (sans transliteration): Pronouns
Audio download: Pronouns Audio

Share Button
The following two tabs change content below.
Hugh Leong loves explaining things. And during his 40 plus years of trying to learn Thai and its culture, he learned to love the cross-cultural aspect of living in a foreign country and speaking its language. His series, Thai Language Thai Culture, covers various aspects of learning Thai, and how the Thai culture influences how we say things.

2 Comments

  1. Thai pronouns in real life.

    Today as I was trimming the bougainvillea on my fence a villager came by on his motorcycle. I just couldn’t remember his name, nor do I think he knew mine. But names are not that important. The conversation went something like this. Pronouns are in quotes.

    Me: Hello “uncle”.
    สวัสดี ครับ “คุณลุง” / sà-wàt-dee kráp “kun-lung” /

    How are “you” (uncle)?
    “คุณลุง” สบายดีไหม / “kun-lung” sà-baai dee măi ?

    Him: I’m fine, and how are “you” (teacher)?
    สบายดี และ “อาจารย์” สบายดีไหม / sà-baai dee láe “aa-jaan” sà-baai dee măi /

    Me: I’m fine
    สบายดี / sà-baai dee /

  2. Thanks a lot, Hugh. Now I’ve gone from partial paralysis in fear of a gaffe a minute to total paralysis in the face of so many options.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

*