A Woman Learning Thai...and some men too ;)

Learn Thai Language & Thai Culture

Author: Catherine Wentworth (page 1 of 67)

WLT: Time for a Time-Out

Time for a Time-Out

Yes. It’s that time…

In 2008 the first post on WLT went live. Does time ever fly. And now it’s time for a Time-Out. I have boxes to pack, places to see, and decisions to make. Life.

While I’m taking a WLT break not all is lost. There are still over 1000 posts for you to cruise that can easily be accessed via the Quick Archives or the Sitemap.

There’s also a quickstart page dedicated to the Thai learning guts of the site: New to WLT? Please start here.

Before I go I’d like to thank the Guest Writers who made WLT possible. Under the dropdown menu there’s Sean Harley (Thai Cat Cartoons and Thai Lyrics Translated), Hugh Leong (Thai Language Thai Culture), Tod Daniels (Thai Language Schools in Bangkok, Tod’s Thai and Tod’s Reviews), Andrew Biggs (Thai Memories), Yuki Tachaya (Colloquial Thai and Thai Connections), Andrej (various subjects), Rikker Dockum (Thai 101), Luke Cassady-Dorion (various subjects). Then under Guest Writers there’s Arthit Juyaso (Thai-Time), Wannaporn Muangkham (65 Useful Thai Phrases You Won’t Find in a Travel Phrasebook), Priaw (Thai Teacher Interviews), Benjawan Poomsan Becker (The Interpreter’s Journal: Teasers), Justin Travis Mair (Speak Your Language), Kris Willems (assorted articles), and Kru Jiab (Thai Style). The One/Two-off Guest Writers are: Jo and Jay (LTP), Luca Lampariello, Paul Garrigan, Sua noy, Chris Pirazzi, Mark Hollow, Christopher Stern, Philip Lyons, Mike Arnstein, Nils Bastedo, Michel Boismard, Ryan Hickey, Maarten Tummers, Fredrik Almstedt, Ann Norman, Alex Martin, Luke Bruder Bauer, Marc Belley and more (some got away from me so I’ll add them as I find them).

Updating the New to WLT? Please start here page reminded me of all the amazing people I’ve met through WLT, as well as the many adventures I’ve had in Thailand. It’s been quite the experience. For sure.

Ta to all. And anon. For now.

Share Button

2018: The Tenth Google Translate Challenge

Google Translate

Google Translate, the challenge…

Welcome to the TENTH Google Translate Challenge! This series is especially for language nerds out there (wherever you are).

To recap: Years one through nine…

2009: The First Google Translate Challenge: I ran two sets of Thai phrases through Google Translate. I shared one list online and the other I kept to myself.

2010: The Second Google Translate Challenge: Reran both sets of Thai phrases through Google Translate and created another set to keep to myself.

2011: The Third Google Translate Challenge: Reran everything through Google Translate yet again.

2012: The Fourth Google Translate Challenge: Ditto in 2012 (reran everything through Google Translate yet again).

2013: The Fifth Google Translate Challenge: I added a few fun phrases plus the phrases from a previous post, Thai Sentence Deconstruction.

2014: The Sixth Google Translate Challenge: Besides running everything through Google Translate, I took off all transliteration. You can download the pdfs with transliteration here: Transliteration: Sixth Google Translate Challenge 2009-2014.

2015: The Seventh Google Translate Challenge: Reran everything through Google Translate yet again.

2016: The eighth Google Translate Challenge: Nothing new added – reran everything through Google Translate yet again.

2017: The ninth Google Translate Challenge: Ditto – nothing new added – reran everything through Google Translate yet again.

NOTE: As mentioned before, if I get enough people requesting I’ll add a pdf with transliteration for the missing years.

Google Neural Machine Translation…

Wiki: Google Neural Machine Translation
Google Neural Machine Translation (GNMT) is a neural machine translation (NMT) system developed by Google and introduced in November 2016, that uses an artificial neural network to increase fluency and accuracy in Google Translate.

GNMT improves on the quality of translation by applying an example based (EBMT) machine translation method in which the system “learns from millions of examples”. GNMT’s proposed architecture of system learning was first tested on over a hundred languages supported by Google Translate. With the large end-to-end framework, the system learns over time to create better, more natural translations. GNMT is capable of translating whole sentences at a time, rather than just piece by piece. The GNMT network can undertake interlingual machine translation by encoding the semantics of the sentence, rather than by memorizing phrase-to-phrase translations.

NOTE:To make it easier to spot any changes possibly due to GNMT, the 2016 dates below are in bold.

TENTH Google Translate Challenge: 2009-2018…

Be careful! There is swine flu!

2009: ระวัง! มีไข้สุกร!
2010: โปรดระวัง มีสุกรไข้หวัดใหญ่เป็น!
2011: โปรดใช้ความระมัดระวัง! มีไข้หวัดหมูเป็น!
2012: ระวัง! มีไข้หวัดหมูเป็น!
2013: ระวัง! มีไข้หวัดหมูเป็น!
2014: ระวัง! มีไข้หวัดหมูเป็น!
2015: ระวัง! มีไข้หวัดหมูเป็น!
2016: ระวัง! มีไข้หวัดหมูเป็น!
2017: ระวัง! มีไข้หวัดหมู!
2018: ระวัง! มีไข้หวัดหมู!

I have swine flu already, thanks!

2009: ฉันมีสุกรไข้หวัดใหญ่แล้วขอบคุณ!
2010: ฉันมีไข้หวัดหมูแล้ว, thanks!
2011: ฉันมีไข้หวัดหมูแล้ว, ขอบคุณ!
2012: ฉันมีไข้หวัดหมูแล้วครับ
2013: ฉันมีไข้หวัดหมูแล้วครับ!
2014: ฉันมีไข้หวัดหมูแล้วขอบคุณ!
2015: ฉันมีไข้หวัดหมูแล้วขอบคุณ!
2016: ฉันมีไข้หวัดหมูแล้วขอบคุณ!
2017: ฉันมีไข้หวัดหมูแล้วขอบคุณ!
2018: ฉันมีไข้หวัดหมูแล้วขอบคุณ!

I don’t know! Why do you ask?

2009: ฉันไม่ทราบ!ทำไมเจ้าถาม?
2010: ไม่ทราบ! ทำไมคุณถาม?
2011: ผมไม่ทราบ! ทำไมคุณถาม?
2012: ผมไม่ทราบ! ทำไมคุณถาม?
2013: ผมไม่ทราบ! ทำไมคุณถาม?
2014: ผมไม่ทราบว่า! ทำไมคุณถาม?
2015: ผมไม่รู้! คุณถามทำไม?
2016: ผมไม่ทราบ! คุณถามทำไม?
2017: ฉันไม่รู้! คุณถามทำไม?
2018: ฉันไม่รู้! คุณถามทำไม?

Did you eat yet?

2009: คุณกินยัง?
2010: คุณไม่กินหรือยัง
2011: คุณไม่ได้กินหรือยัง
2012: คุณกินหรือยัง
2013: คุณไม่ได้กินยัง?
2014: คุณไม่ได้กินหรือยัง?
2015: คุณไม่ได้กินหรือยัง
2016: คุณไม่กินหรือยัง
2017: คุณกินหรือยัง?
2018: คุณกินหรือยัง?

Oh no! You’re a liar!

2009: แย่ละ!คุณเป็นคนพูดเท็จ!
2010: Oh no! คุณโกหก!
2011: Oh No! คุณโกหก!
2012: โอ้ไม่! คุณโกหก!
2013: โอ้ไม่! คุณโกหก!
2014: โอ้ไม่! คุณโกหก!
2015: ไม่นะ! คุณโกหก!
2016: ไม่นะ! คุณโกหก!
2017: ไม่นะ! คุณโกหก!
2018: ไม่นะ! คุณโกหก!

I don’t want to see your face again.

2009: ฉันไม่ต้องการดูหน้าของคุณอีกครั้ง
2010: ฉันไม่อยากเห็นหน้าคุณอีกครั้ง
2011: ฉันไม่ต้องการที่จะเห็นใบหน้าของคุณอีกครั้ง
2012: ฉันไม่ต้องการที่จะเห็นหน้าคุณอีกครั้ง
2013: ฉันไม่ต้องการที่จะเห็นใบหน้าของคุณอีกครั้ง
2014: ฉันไม่ต้องการที่จะเห็นใบหน้าของคุณอีกครั้ง
2015: ฉันไม่ต้องการที่จะเห็นใบหน้าของคุณอีกครั้ง
2016: ฉันไม่ต้องการที่จะเห็นใบหน้าของคุณอีกครั้ง
2017: ฉันไม่ต้องการเห็นหน้าคุณอีก
2018: ฉันไม่ต้องการเห็นหน้าคุณอีก

He is busy lighting a mosquito coil.

2009: พระองค์คือยุ่งแสงสว่างที่ยุงม้วน
2010: เขาเป็นไฟม้วนยุ่งยุง
2011: พระองค์ทรงเป็นแสงยุ่งขดลวดยุง
2012: เขาเป็นแสงสว่างว่างม้วนยุง
2013: เขาเป็นแสงยุ่งยุงขดลวด
2014: เขาไม่ว่างจุดยากันยุง
2015: เขาไม่ว่างแสงมุ้งม้วน
2016: เขาไม่ว่างแสงขดลวดยุง
2017: เขายุ่งอยู่กับแสงสว่างเป็นยุง
2018: เขากำลังยุ่งอยู่กับการเป็นมุ้งลวด

Don’t put any fish sauce on the rice. It stinks!

2009: โปรดอย่าวางใดน้ำปลาใน ข้าว. มัน stinks!
2010: ไม่ใส่น้ำปลาบนข้าว It stinks!
2011: ไม่ใส่น้ำปลาใด ๆ บนข้าว มัน stinks!
2012: ไม่ใส่น้ำปลาใด ๆ บนข้าว มันเหม็น!
2013: ไม่ใส่น้ำปลาใด ๆ บนข้าว มัน stinks!
2014: ไม่ใส่น้ำปลาใด ๆ ในข้าว มันมีกลิ่นเหม็น!
2015: ไม่ใส่น้ำปลาใด ๆ บนข้าว มันเหม็น!
2016: ไม่ใส่น้ำปลาใด ๆ บนข้าว มันเหม็น!
2017: อย่าใส่น้ำปลาในข้าว มันเหม็น!
2018: อย่าใส่น้ำปลาในข้าว มันเหม็น!

The first Google Challenge control group…

I first ran these sentences through Google Translate in 2009 and 2010, but I didn’t post them until 2010 because I wanted to see if anything noticeable happened.

He tells me that he loves me with all his heart.

2009: เขาบอกผมว่าเขารักฉันกับหัวใจของเขาทั้งหมด
2010: เขาบอกว่าเขารักฉันด้วยหัวใจทั้งหมดของเขา
2011: เขาบอกผมว่าเขารักฉันด้วยหัวใจของเขา
2012: เขาบอกฉันว่าเขารักฉันด้วยหัวใจทั้งหมดของเขา
2013: เขาบอกฉันว่าเขารักฉันด้วยหัวใจทั้งหมดของเขา
2014: เขาบอกฉันว่าเขารักฉันด้วยหัวใจทั้งหมดของเขา
2015: เขาบอกผมว่าเขารักฉันด้วยหัวใจของเขาทั้งหมด
2016: เขาบอกผมว่าเขารักฉันด้วยหัวใจของเขาทั้งหมด
2017: เขาบอกฉันว่าเขารักฉันด้วยสุดใจ
2018: เขาบอกฉันว่าเขารักฉันด้วยหัวใจทั้งหมด

Do you speak English?

2009: คุณพูดภาษาอังกฤษ?
2010: คุณพูดภาษาอังกฤษ
2011: คุณพูดภาษาอังกฤษ?
2012: คุณพูดภาษาอังกฤษ?
2013: คุณพูดภาษาอังกฤษได้ไหม
2014: คุณพูดภาษาอังกฤษได้ไหม
2015: คุณพูดภาษาอังกฤษได้ไหม?
2016: คุณพูดภาษาอังกฤษได้ไหม?
2017: คุณพูดภาษาอังกฤษได้ไหม?
2018: คุณพูดภาษาอังกฤษได้ไหม?

What did the nurse say?

2009: อะไรได้พยาบาลกล่าว?
2010: พยาบาลพูดว่าอะไร?
2011: พยาบาลพูดว่าอะไร?
2012: พยาบาลพูดว่าอะไร?
2013: พยาบาลพูดว่าอะไร?
2014: สิ่งที่พยาบาลพูด?
2015: อะไรที่พยาบาลพูด?
2016: อะไรพยาบาลพูด?
2017: พยาบาลบอกว่าอย่างไร?
2018: พยาบาลบอกว่าอย่างไร?

That water buffalo meat comes from the north.

2009: นั่นควายเนื้อมาจากทางเหนือ
2010: ที่เนื้อควายมาจากภาคเหนือ
2011: ว่าเนื้อควายมาจากทางทิศเหนือ
2012: ว่าเนื้อควายมาจากทางทิศเหนือ
2013: ที่เนื้อควายมาจากทิศเหนือ
2014: ว่าเนื้อควายมาจากทิศตะวันตกเฉียงเหนือ
2015: เนื้อควายว่าน้ำมาจากทางเหนือ
2016: ว่าเนื้อควายมาจากทิศตะวันตกเฉียงเหนือ
2017: เนื้อควายนั้นมาจากทางเหนือ
2018: เนื้อควายนั้นมาจากทางเหนือ

Please give me a glass of orange juice.

2009: กรุณาให้ฉันหนึ่งแก้วน้ำส้ม
2010: กรุณาให้แก้วน้ำสีส้ม
2011: กรุณาให้ฉันแก้วน้ำสีส้ม
2012: กรุณาให้ฉันแก้วน้ำส้ม
2013: กรุณาให้ฉันแก้วน้ำส้ม
2014: โปรดให้ฉันแก้วน้ำผลไม้สีส้ม
2015: กรุณาให้แก้วน้ำผลไม้สีส้ม
2016: โปรดให้ฉันแก้วน้ำผลไม้สีส้ม
2017: ขอให้ฉันดื่มน้ำส้มสักหนึ่งแก้ว
2018: ขอให้ฉันดื่มน้ำส้มสักหนึ่งแก้ว

The turtle reaches the finish line before the rabbit.

2009: เต่าที่ครบตามเส้นชัยก่อนกระต่าย
2010: เต่าถึงเส้นชัยก่อนกระต่าย
2011: เต่าถึงเส้นชัยก่อนกระต่าย
2012: เต่าถึงเส้นชัยก่อนกระต่าย
2013: เต่าถึงเส้นชัยก่อนกระต่าย
2014: เต่าถึงเส้นชัยก่อนกระต่าย
2015: เต่าถึงเส้นชัยก่อนที่กระต่าย
2016: เต่าถึงเส้นชัยก่อนกระต่าย
2017: เต่าถึงเส้นชัยก่อนที่กระต่าย
2018: เต่าถึงเส้นชัยก่อนที่กระต่าย

The 2010 Google Challenge control group…

These sentences were created in 2010 but kept under wraps until 2011.

How was last night?

2010: เมื่อคืนนี้นี้เป็นยังไงบ้างคะ
2011: วิธีการคืนสุดท้ายคืออะไร
2012: วิธีการคืนสุดท้ายคือ?
2013: วิธีคืนที่ผ่านมา?
2014: วิธีเป็นคืนสุดท้าย
2015: เมื่อคืนเป็นไง?
2016: เมื่อคืนนี้เป็นอย่างไรบ้าง?
2017: เมื่อคืนนี้เป็นอย่างไรบ้าง
2018: เมื่อคืนนี้เป็นอย่างไรบ้าง?

Did anything exciting happen last night?

2010: เมื่อคืนนี้มีอะไรเกิดขึ้นบ้างตอนที่ฉันไม่อยู่
2011: สิ่งที่น่าตื่นเต้นเกิดขึ้นเมื่อคืน?
2012: ทำอะไรที่น่าตื่นเต้นเกิดขึ้นเมื่อคืน?
2013: ทำอะไรที่น่าตื่นเต้นเกิดขึ้นเมื่อคืนที่ผ่าน?
2014: มีอะไรที่น่าตื่นเต้นเกิดขึ้นเมื่อคืนนี้?
2015: อะไรที่น่าตื่นเต้นเกิดขึ้นเมื่อคืนที่ผ่าน?
2016: มีอะไรที่น่าตื่นเต้นเกิดขึ้นเมื่อคืนที่ผ่าน?
2017: มีอะไรที่น่าตื่นเต้นเกิดขึ้นเมื่อคืนนี้หรือไม่?
2018: มีอะไรที่น่าตื่นเต้นเกิดขึ้นเมื่อคืนนี้หรือไม่?

Sleep comfortably?

2010: หลับสบายไหมคะ
2011: นอนหลับสบาย?
2012: นอนหลับสบาย?
2013: นอนหลับสบาย?
2014: นอนหลับสบาย?
2015: นอนหลับสบาย?
2016: นอนหลับอย่างสบาย?
2017: นอนสบาย?
2018: นอนสบาย?

So very tired today.

2010: วันนี้เหนื่อยมากเลย
2011: ดังนั้นวันนี้เหนื่อยมาก
2012: ดังนั้นวันนี้เหนื่อยมาก
2013: เหนื่อยมากในวันนี้
2014: เหนื่อยมากในวันนี้
2015: เหนื่อยมากในวันนี้
2016: เหนื่อยมากในวันนี้
2017: เหนื่อยมากในวันนี้
2018: เหนื่อยมากในวันนี้

Because last night you snored.

2010: เพราะ(ว่า)เมื่อคืนคุณกรน
2011: เพราะคืนสุดท้ายที่คุณ snored
2012: เพราะคืนสุดท้ายที่คุณ snored
2013: เพราะคืนสุดท้ายที่คุณกรน
2014: เพราะคืนสุดท้ายที่คุณ snored
2015: เนื่องจากคืนที่ผ่านมาคุณ snored
2016: เนื่องจากคืนที่ผ่านมาคุณ snored
2017: เพราะเมื่อคืนคุณนอนกรน
2018: เพราะเมื่อคืนคุณนอนกรน

Google translate does have กรน /gron/ for snore and การกรน /gaa-rók ron/ for snoring/snore so there’s no excuse to use “snored”.

Thai sentence deconstruction…

I’m adding the sentences from Thai Sentence Deconstruction because the simple sentences show a bit more of what’s going on with Google Translate.

The apple is red.

2013: แอปเปิ้ลเป็นสีแดง
2014: แอปเปิ้ลเป็นสีแดง
2015: แอปเปิ้ลจะเป็นสีแดง
2016: แอปเปิ้ลสีแดง
2017: แอปเปิ้ลเป็นสีแดง
2018: แอปเปิ้ลเป็นสีแดง

It is John’s apple.

2013: มันเป็นของจอห์นแอปเปิ้ล
2014: มันเป็นแอปเปิ้ลของจอห์น
2015: มันเป็นแอปเปิ้ลของจอห์น
2016: มันเป็นแอปเปิ้ลของจอห์น
2017: มันเป็นแอปเปิ้ลของจอห์น
2018: มันเป็นแอปเปิ้ลของจอห์น

I give John the apple.

2013: ฉันให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ล
2014: ฉันให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ล
2015: ฉันให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ล
2016: ฉันให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ล
2017: ฉันให้ John แอปเปิ้ล
2018: ฉันให้ John แอปเปิ้ล

We give him the apple.

2013: เราจะให้เขาแอปเปิ้ล
2014: เราจะให้เขาแอปเปิ้ล
2015: เราจะให้เขาแอปเปิ้ล
2016: เราจะให้เขาแอปเปิ้ล
2017: เราให้เขาแอปเปิ้ล
2018: เราให้เขาแอปเปิ้ล

He gives it to John.

2013: เขาให้ไปให้จอห์น
2014: เขาให้มันกับจอห์น
2015: เขาให้มันกับจอห์น
2016: เขาให้มันอยู่กับจอห์น
2017: เขามอบให้กับยอห์น
2018: เขามอบให้กับยอห์น

She gives it to him.

2013: เธอมอบให้ท่าน
2014: เธอให้แก่เขา
2015: เธอให้แก่เขา
2016: เธอให้แก่เขา
2017: เธอให้มันแก่เขา
2018: เธอให้มันแก่เขา

I don’t give apples.

2013: ฉันไม่ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2014: ฉันจะไม่ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2015: ฉันไม่ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2016: ฉันไม่ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2017: ฉันไม่ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2018: ฉันไม่ให้แอปเปิ้ล

They don’t give apples.

2013: พวกเขาไม่ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2014: พวกเขาไม่ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2015: พวกเขาไม่ได้ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2016: พวกเขาไม่ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2017: พวกเขาไม่ได้ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2018: พวกเขาไม่ได้ให้แอปเปิ้ล

He doesn’t give apples.

2013: เขาไม่ได้ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2014: เขาไม่ได้ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2015: เขาไม่ได้ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2016: เขาไม่ได้ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2017: เขาไม่ได้ให้แอปเปิ้ล
2018: เขาไม่ได้ให้แอปเปิ้ล

I gave John an apple yesterday.

2013: ฉันให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ลเมื่อวานนี้
2014: ฉันให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ลเมื่อวานนี้
2015: ฉันให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ลเมื่อวานนี้
2016: ฉันให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ลเมื่อวานนี้
2017: เมื่อวานนี้ผมให้ John แอปเปิ้ล
2018: ตอนนี้ฉันให้ John แอปเปิ้ล

She gave John an apple last week.

2013: เธอให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ลเมื่อสัปดาห์ก่อน
2014: เธอให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ลเมื่อสัปดาห์ที่แล้ว
2015: เธอให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ลเมื่อสัปดาห์ที่แล้ว
2016: เธอให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ลเมื่อสัปดาห์ที่แล้ว
2017: เธอให้ John กับแอปเปิ้ลเมื่อสัปดาห์ที่แล้ว
2018: เมื่อสัปดาห์ที่แล้วเธอให้ John แอปเปิ้ล

We’ll give John an apple tomorrow.

2013: เราจะให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ลในวันพรุ่งนี้
2014: เราจะให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ลในวันพรุ่งนี้
2015: เราจะให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ลในวันพรุ่งนี้
2016: เราจะให้จอห์นแอปเปิ้ลในวันพรุ่งนี้
2017: วันพรุ่งนี้เราจะมอบแอปเปิ้ลให้กับแอปเปิล
2018: วันพรุ่งนี้เราจะมอบแอปเปิ้ลให้กับแอปเปิล

Tomorrow we will give an apple to John.

2013: พรุ่งนี้เราจะให้แอปเปิ้ลกับจอห์น
2014: ในวันพรุ่งนี้เราจะให้แอปเปิ้ลกับจอห์น
2015: พรุ่งนี้เราจะให้แอปเปิ้ลกับจอห์น
2016: พรุ่งนี้เราจะให้แอปเปิ้ลกับจอห์น
2017: พรุ่งนี้เราจะมอบแอปเปิ้ลให้กับจอห์น
2018: พรุ่งนี้เราจะให้แอปเปิ้ลกับจอห์น

I must give it to him.

2013: ฉันจะต้องให้มันกับเขา
2014: ผมต้องให้แก่เขา
2015: ผมต้องให้แก่เขา
2016: ผมต้องให้แก่เขา
2017: ฉันต้องให้มันแก่เขา
2018: ฉันต้องให้มันแก่เขา

I want to give it to her.

2013: ฉันต้องการที่จะให้มันกับเธอ
2014: ฉันต้องการที่จะให้มันกับเธอ
2015: ฉันต้องการที่จะให้มันอยู่กับเธอ
2016: ฉันต้องการที่จะให้มันอยู่กับเธอ
2017: ฉันต้องการมอบให้กับเธอ
2018: ฉันต้องการมอบให้กับเธอ

Phrases from 2013…

These phrases were first checked in 2013 – I held on to them until 2014.

Just how badly do you want it?

2013: คุณไม่เพียงแค่ว่าไม่ดีต้องการหรือไม่
2014: เพียงแค่ว่าไม่ดีคุณไม่ต้องการมันได้หรือไม่
2015: เพียงแค่ว่าไม่ดีที่คุณต้องการได้หรือไม่
2016: เพียงแค่ว่าไม่ดีที่คุณต้องการได้หรือไม่
2017: คุณต้องการมันมากแค่ไหน?
2018: คุณต้องการมันมากแค่ไหน?

I don’t want anything from you.

2013: ฉันไม่ต้องการอะไรจากคุณ
2014: ฉันไม่ต้องการอะไรจากคุณ
2015: ฉันไม่ต้องการอะไรจากคุณ
2016: ฉันไม่ต้องการอะไรจากคุณ
2017: ฉันไม่ต้องการอะไรจากคุณ
2018: ฉันไม่ต้องการอะไรจากคุณ

Really? I don’t believe you.

2013: จริงเหรอ? ผมไม่เชื่อว่าคุณ
2014: จริงเหรอ? ผมไม่เชื่อว่าคุณ
2015: จริงเหรอ? ฉันไม่เชื่อคุณ
2016: จริงๆ? ผมไม่เชื่อว่าคุณ
2017: จริงๆ? ฉันไม่เชื่อคุณ
2018: จริงๆ? ฉันไม่เชื่อคุณ

Hah! Well, you’d better start believing it sweetie.

2013: ฮะ! ดีคุณควรที่จะเริ่มเชื่อว่าแฟนมัน
2014: ฮะ! ทางที่ดีคุณควรที่จะเริ่มเชื่อว่ามันแฟน
2015: ฮะ! ทางที่ดีคุณควรที่จะเริ่มเชื่อว่ามันแฟน
2016: ฮ่าฮ่า! ทางที่ดีคุณควรที่จะเริ่มเชื่อว่ามันแฟน
2017: ฮะ! ดีคุณควรเริ่มต้นเชื่อ sweetie
2018: ฮะ! ดีคุณควรเริ่มต้นเชื่อ sweetie

Sigh. You’re such a kidder.

2013: ถอนหายใจ คุณคิดเดอร์ดังกล่าว
2014: ถอนหายใจ คุณเช่น KIDDER
2015: ถอนหายใจ คุณคิดเดอร์ดังกล่าว
2016: เซ็นต์. คุณคิดเดอร์ดังกล่าว
2017: ถอนหายใจ คุณเป็นคนชอบพอ
2018: ถอนหายใจ คุณเป็นคนชอบพอ

Yeah. I know. I know.

2013: ใช่ ฉันรู้ว่า ฉันรู้ว่า
2014: ใช่ ฉันรู้ว่า ฉันรู้ว่า
2015: ใช่ ฉันรู้ ฉันรู้
2016: ใช่. ฉันรู้ว่า. ฉันรู้ว่า.
2017: ใช่. ฉันรู้ว่า. ฉันรู้ว่า.
2018: ใช่. ฉันรู้ว่า. ฉันรู้ว่า.

2017: A Curiosity…

At the end of May I was involved in a conversation about Google Translate so I ran the phrases through early, then shared them in a Facebook group. When I checked the sentences again in July these four had changed.

He is busy lighting a mosquito coil.

May: เขายุ่งอยู่กับการยุงม้วนยุง
July: เขายุ่งอยู่กับแสงสว่างเป็นยุง
2018: เขากำลังยุ่งอยู่กับการเป็นมุ้งลวด

He tells me that he loves me with all his heart.

May: เขาบอกฉันว่าเขารักฉันด้วยหัวใจทั้งหมด
July: เขาบอกฉันว่าเขารักฉันด้วยสุดใจ
2018: เขาบอกฉันว่าเขารักฉันด้วยหัวใจทั้งหมด

I gave John an apple yesterday.

May: ตอนนี้ฉันให้ John แอปเปิ้ล
July: เมื่อวานนี้ผมให้ John แอปเปิ้ล
2018: ตอนนี้ฉันให้ John แอปเปิ้ล

Tomorrow we will give an apple to John.

May: พรุ่งนี้เราจะให้แอปเปิ้ลกับจอห์น
July: พรุ่งนี้เราจะมอบแอปเปิ้ลให้กับจอห์น
2018: พรุ่งนี้เราจะให้แอปเปิ้ลกับจอห์น

October 2017: Google Translate vrs Benjawan…

In the Thai and Lao Interpreters’ Study Group on Facebook, Benjawan pitted human translation against machine. Below are the results.

How did you do on your exam?
Benjawan 2017: ทำข้อสอบเป็นไงบ้าง

GT 2017: คุณทำอย่างไรกับการสอบของคุณ

GT 2018: คุณทำอย่างไรกับการสอบของคุณ?

I blew it.
Benjawan 2017: ทำมั่วไปหมดเลย

GT 2017: ฉันเป่าลม

GT 2018: ฉันเป่าลม

We have no money right now but we have to bite the bullet.

Benjawan 2017: เราไม่มีเงินตอนนี้ แต่เราก็ต้องกัดฟันสู้ต่อไป

GT 2017: เราไม่มีเงินตอนนี้ แต่เราต้องกัดกระสุน
GT 2018: เราไม่มีเงินตอนนี้ แต่เราต้องกัดกระสุน

If you don’t listen to me, you will have to face the music.
Benjawan 2017: ถ้าคุณไม่ฟังฉัน คุณก็จะต้องเผชิญกับผลที่จะตามมา

GT 2017: ถ้าคุณไม่ฟังฉัน คุณจะต้องเผชิญกับเพลง

GT 2018: ถ้าคุณไม่ฟังฉันคุณจะต้องเผชิญกับเพลง

It’s 11 now. We should hit the hay.
Benjawan 2017: ตอนนี้ห้าทุ่มแล้ว เราควรเข้านอนได้แล้ว

GT 2017: ตอนนี้ถึง 11 แล้ว เราควรจะตีหญ้าแห้ง

GT 2018: ตอนนี้ถึง 11 แล้ว เราควรจะตีหญ้าแห้ง

They just sold their house. Now they are sitting pretty.
Benjawan 2017: พวกเขาเพิ่งขายบ้านไป ตอนนี้พวกเขามีเงินใช้สอยอย่างสบาย

GT 2017: พวกเขาเพิ่งขายบ้านของพวกเขา ตอนนี้พวกเขากำลังนั่งสวย

GT 2018: พวกเขาเพิ่งขายบ้านของพวกเขา ตอนนี้พวกเขากำลังนั่งสวย

Bob was hot under the collar after someone cut him off in traffic.

Benjawan 2017: บ๊อบโกรธจัดหลังจากที่มีคนขับรถปาดหน้า

GT 2017: บ๊อบร้อนใต้ปลอกคอหลังจากที่มีคนตัดเขาออกจากการจราจร

GT 2018: บ๊อบร้อนใต้ปลอกคอหลังจากที่มีคนตัดเขาออกจากการจราจร

The early bird catches the worm.
Benjawan 2017: ใครมาก่อน ได้เปรียบ

GT 2017: นกเริ่มจับหนอน

GT 2018: นกเริ่มจับหนอน

I smell a rat. Let’s call the police.
Benjawan 2017: รู้สึกว่ามีอะไรผิดปกติ เรียกตำรวจกันดีกว่า

GT 2017: ฉันได้กลิ่นหนู ขอเรียกตำรวจ

GT 2018: ฉันได้กลิ่นหนู. ขอเรียกตำรวจ

The robbers got away clean.

Benjawan 2017: โจรหลบหนีไปได้อย่างไร้ร่องรอย

GT 2017: โจรได้สะอาด

GT 2018: โจรได้สะอาด

Everybody was dressed to kill last night.

Benjawan 2017: ทุกคนแต่งตัวแบบสวยพริ้งเมื่อคืนนี้

GT 2017: ทุกคนแต่งกายเพื่อฆ่าคืนนี้

GT 2018: ทุกคนแต่งกายเพื่อฆ่าคืนนี้

Google Translate news…

The Shallowness of Google Translate: The program uses state-of-the-art AI techniques, but simple tests show that it’s a long way from real understanding.

Share Button

EXTENDED: PickupThai Podcast’s Songkran Sale

PickupThai Podcast

A HEADS UP! PickupThai Podcast’s website has been hacked so I’m running an emergency post to get the word out.

PickupThai’s website (www.pickup-thai.com) is temporarily inaccessible due to unexpected circumstances. However, you can still order podcasts (PickupThai Podcast) and request free samples by email.

Payments are accepted through Paypal and Thai bank transfer. The links to the podcasts will be sent to you by email to download from.

The Songkran Grand Sale – Buy Two Courses, Get One Course Free (all three courses for only $198 USD) is still running and has been extended until April 30th.

Should you have any questions, feel free to contact the admins at contact [@] pickup-thai.com or through their Facebook page: PickUpThai or Twitter account @PickupThai.

Yuki Tachaya and Miki Chidchaya

As their information is down as well, here’s a review of Green (intermediate) and Red (advanced), and an overview of Coconut (beginners):

Green and Red: Review: PickupThai Podcast by Yuki and Miki
Coconut: WLT’s 2016 Thai Language Giveaway: PickupThai Podcast

Good luck Yuki and Miki – your site is sure to be back soon!

Share Button

Pocket Thai’s Songkran Sale 2018

Pocket Thai

Introducing Pocket Thai…

Introducing Pocket Thai – WLT’s latest sponsor (see more about sponsoring / donating here). Pocket Thai’s Songkran sale runs from Thursday (April 12) to Monday (April 16), but first, here’s a bit about the app from the sponsor.

Pocket Thai…

In a market full of vocab memorization apps, Pocket Thai tries to do something new: teach the language from the ground up.

Pocket Thai is a Thai language learning program and culture guide for iOS and Android that takes you from zero Thai language experience up to the conversational level. This program prepares you for life, work, and travel in Thailand with easily to follow explanations of Thai grammar and culture.

Pocket Thai is designed for beginners and teaches you how to read and speak Thai with culture lessons and travel advice mixed in along the way. You can learn at your own pace and study from anywhere since there’s no internet connection required!

Quizzes at the end of the lessons are randomly generated so that you can repeat them and see new questions in a new order, which makes review much more interesting. Most importantly there are over 1200 audio files from both female and male native Thai speakers, which means that everyone that uses Pocket Thai will have a native speaker to model their speech after.

Pocket Thai’s Songkran Sale…


From April 12 to April 16 you can unlock the full 38 lesson curriculum of Pocket Thai Master for only $6.99 (usually $9.99).

Or if you only want to learn how to read Thai you can unlock the full 12 lesson Pocket Thai Reading for only $2.99 (usually $4.99).

Testimonials…

You can try the first five lessons for free to see if Pocket Thai works for you before you unlock the full program but if you want to see what other people think before you take the time to install it here are a few recent reviews:

The conversational tone of the app and sequential nature has really accelerated the learning process for me, and the supplementary educational elements concerning Thai customs, history, and other points of context show that the developer really understands that learning a new language is really inseparable from encountering a complete culture.
-mmrrkk (iOS user)

Checked out many apps but this is the first app which really takes you through lessons step by step… easy to follow and easy to learn.
-Ralf (Android user)

This app is absolutely excellent. I speak 4 other languages aside from Thai, and thus far this has been one of the best overall language apps I have seen. It’s extremely thorough and written in simple, non-technical language so even absolute beginners can make sense of a very difficult language. The quizzes at the end of each lesson are great too!
-Tokyo Teacher (iOS user)

Been in Thailand for 9 years. On and off learning Thai and this has been a great help. I feel it explained the rules to me very well and made it easier to read more!
-jr7diving (Android user)

Try it today…

To find links to the App Store and Google Play pages or learn more about Pocket Thai: Learn Thai.

Share Button

Language Exchange Chiang Mai: English, Thai, Chinese, German and more

Language Exchange Chiang Mai

Language Exchange Chiang Mai…

I first heard about the Chiang mai language exchange group back in 2015 from Daniel Styles. Since then Daniel relocated (but still shows up on occasion), the group was taken over by his mate Maik Cook, and they all shifted to CUBE7 after the closure of their former meeting place, FOCUS.

People from all over the world come to Language Exchange meetings every Wednesday and Saturday. The four most spoken languages are English, Thai, Chinese, and German but many more are represented at the group. Many people at Language Exchange are now friends, but everyone became friends the same way – after meeting and talking with people in the group.

The meetups are a perfect size, anywhere from 10 to 25 people each time. And while they welcome visitors who show up from elsewhere to practice their chosen languages, the meetings mostly consist of intermediate and advanced learners who live, work, or study in Chiang Mai.

The group meets all year around except for during Songkran and the Loy Krathong festival. And on top of their regular language meetups, there’s now a ‘Language Exchange Karaoke Night’ was well as a ‘Language Exchange Food Night’. Sounds like fun!

Their Language Exchange Chiang Mai Facebook group presently has around 2,760 members, comprised of those living in Chiang mai and those planning a holiday around a visit to the language exchange.

If you live in Chiang mai or will be there anytime soon, perhaps stop by?

FB: Language Exchange Chiang Mai
Time: 7pm, Wednesday and Saturday
Venue: CUBE7, Siri Mangkalajarn Rd Lane 7, Thesaban Nakhon Chiang Mai

Share Button

Successful Thai Language Learner: Frank Smith

Frank Smith

Name: Frank Smith
Nationality: US
Age range: 50-60
Sex: Male
Location: US
Profession: University language lecturer (Khmer)
Websites: Study Khmer and Study Lao

What is your Thai level?

Speaking: low-mid advanced
Listening: high advanced
Reading and Writing: low advanced

Do you speak more street Thai, Issan Thai, or professional Thai?

Mostly colloquial/informal, but I can speak polite/formal when needed; I also speak Issan (Lao) at pretty much the same level as I speak Thai.

What were your reasons for learning Thai?

General interest in Southeast Asia, but my ability greatly increased when I moved to Thailand…then I learned it to function as a member of society on a daily basis.

Do you live in Thailand? If so, when did you arrive?

I lived in Bangkok from 2002-2008; visited once a year starting in 1999, visited 3x a year from 2009-2013, now back to once a year. I’ll eventually retire to Thailand.

How long have you been a student of the Thai language?

1999-2018

Did you learn Thai right away, or was it a many-pronged approach?

I started learning from an informal Thai tutor in Seattle in 1999 once I knew I was going to visit, both speaking and reading/writing. From the moment I first landed in Thailand I tried to speak only in Thai to all Thais I interacted with, a strategy I maintain to this day. The only exception was a group of Thais educated in the US (mostly artists and musicians) I interacted with in my first few years of speaking Thai–I spoke English with them then, but speak only Thai with them now.

Did you stick to a regular study schedule?

Not really, since I was pretty much always working on improving my Thai from the moment that I moved there.

What Thai language learning methods did you try?

Learning vocabulary and grammar from an old (1950s or 60s?) textbook (I no longer have it and can’t remember the name or author), constantly practicing with native speakers in a wide range of social situations, reading signs, newspapers, magazines, watching karaoke videos, reading songbooks.

How soon did you tackle reading and writing Thai?

Immediately.

Did you find learning to read and write Thai difficult?

Not difficult at all, because I was already fluent in [spoken and written] Khmer when I began to study Thai.

What was your first ‘ah hah!’ moment?

After living in Thailand about 1.5 years and using it daily, there was a moment when I had finally figured out all the proper spoken uses of ก็ (and distinguishing those uses from how it’s used in Khmer) and was able to use it confidently in my own speech; that was a significant moment that I remember clearly. Other, related, ‘a-hah!’ moments like that came when I was able to start using the final particles นะ and เลย correctly in my speech.

How do you learn languages? (learning styles)

I learn languages by using them as much as I can for communication, with periodic study of vocabulary and grammar to fill in gaps in my communicative ability. When I decide to learn a language, I will refuse to speak anything but that language to native speakers, no matter how good their English is and no matter how much they protest.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

Strengths: Pronunciation, speed/fluidity, use of colloquial vocabulary, domestic issues/relationship discussions, pop culture, expression of personal feelings/opinions.

Weaknesses: political vocabulary/discussions on issues such as politics, the economy, etc.; tones.

What is the biggest misconception for students learning Thai?

Probably the same misconception that all students of a language that differs radically (grammar, etc.) from their native language share: the belief that every word in the target language (in this case, Thai) must have an exact equivalent in their native language. Once one accepts that the “semantic range” of many Thai words is way, way broader than any one English (or whatever) word, learning gets a lot easier. “Translation” and “word lists” are very inefficient and often frustrating ways to try to learn a new language.

Can you make your way around any other languages?

Khmer (fluent), Lao (probably the same level of proficiency that I have in Thai, including reading and writing), Vietnamese (knew it well years ago, but I can only speak it now when I’m physically in Vietnam), Spanish.

Were you learning another language at the same time as Thai?

No…and as a language teacher, I highly recommend NOT trying to learn two or more languages at the same time.

What advice would you give to students of the Thai language?

Speak as much Thai as you can, to native speakers, as often as you can…resist the urge to resort to English, despite how much more comfortable it might be. Have as your goal “thinking in Thai,” and get away from the notion that learning Thai means translating from English words or grammar into Thai. Also, learn to read and write as soon as you start to learn to speak, and do not use any sort of phonetic transcription or transliteration.

regards,
Frank Smith
Study Khmer and Study Lao

The Series: Interviewing Successful Thai Language Learners…

If you’d like to read more interviews the entire series is here: Interviewing Successful Thai Language Learners.

If you are a successful Thai language learner and would like to share your experiences, please contact me. I’d love to hear from you.

Share Button

L-lingo’s Seven Day FREE Thai Course

Seven Day Thai Course

This is your lucky day! L-Lingo just launched a FREE Seven Day Thai Course.

When you sign up, for a week you will get an email a day with great Thai learning resources to jump start your Thai learning. The material included is suitable for both beginners and intermediate learners.

This is what you will receive:

  • Thai Grammar.
  • Thai high frequency word lists (top 150 and top 1000 Thai words).
  • 100 important Thai phrases.
  • Tips for effective language learning.

When I reached out to ask about the reasoning behind this generous offer, I was told that the Seven Day Thai Course is a part of the launch of a new strategic focus at L-Lingo. By analyzing the progress of thousands of students on the way they learn, the people behind L-Lingo realized that most students give up learning Thai because they cannot stay motivated, and not because of a lack of learning resources!

So to tackle that issue, L-Lingo has turned their focus on implementing features that will help you stay on course with your Thai learning. To assist with this, Melanie at L-Lingo now has the official job description as “Student Success Manager” and will introduce herself once you sign up for the Seven Day Thai Course.

Some time ago L-Lingo implemented the feature of daily learning reminder emails in their web app and one of the next features will be motivating progress badges. In line with this, the new Seven Day Thai Course focuses heavily on giving you ideas about how to learn effectively without giving up. Sounds great to me!

You can signup to the free Thai course on the L-Ceps/L-Lingo page: Seven Day Thai Course.

Happy Learning!

Share Button

Kickstarter: Thai Font Poster by Lanna Innovation

Thai Font Poster by Lanna Innovation

If you’ve ever had a problem deciphering creative Thai fonts, then Lanna Innovation’s Thai Font Poster might be just what you need.

Thai Font Poster Kickstarter by Lanna Innovation: There is an enormous diversity in Thai fonts (typefaces) found in Thailand, and used everywhere, from Thai movie posters, to Thai advertisements, to Thai signage of all kinds, to Thai restaurant menus. Unfortunately, even if someone learns the fonts used in standard Thai by the government, in use on websites, and in books, that is not enough to be able to read Thai in Thailand.

We had to start by curating a Thai Font Collection which would meet the needs for the Thai Font Poster. This font collection took on a life of its own and we are pleased to include over 300 font files in 98 font families, which are free to download and use, and found at: Thai Font Collection.

We have the most extensive collection that we are aware of, and the cleanest set when it comes to licensing and rights.

From these fonts we selected 20 which showcase the variety and diversity of Thai fonts found in Thailand. With those twenty, we created a two-sided, two-color Thai Font Poster which displays side-by-side all representative characters as found on Thai keyboards and mobile devices.

To help make Lanna Innovation’s project happen please read further: Kickstarter – Thai Font Poster.

Web: Lanna Innovation – Thai Language and Culture
Twitter: @LannaInnovation

Share Button

Xmas Gift from L-Lingo: ANKI Deck with 1000 Thai Words and Phrases (audio included)

Xmas Gift from L-Lingo

Xmas is coming early this year! For those who want to get a jumpstart on their New Year’s Resolution to learn Thai, L-lingo is giving away an ANKI Deck with 1000 top frequency Thai words and sample phrases. Audio included.

Download the deck here: Thai 1000 Common Words

If you’ve never tried L-lingo, check out the free version of their Quiz-Based Thai lessons.

L-Lingo immerses you in the sights and sounds of the Thai language, rather than just the written word. Our multi-channel teaching method gives you real and rapid results much quicker than traditional flash-card or textbook approaches. Before you know it, you’ll be speaking words and longer sentences with real confidence.

Ho ho ho everyone! Happy Holidays to you and yours.

Share Button

Proposal: A Thai Language Stack Exchange

Stack Exchange Thai Language

Over at FCLT Jeff Mcneill shared his proposal for a Thai Language Stack Exchange. And as I was unaware of the resource I had to Google.

About: Launched in 2010, the Stack Exchange network consists of 133 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers. Since then, the Stack Exchange network has grown into a top 50 online destination with Stack Overflow alone serving more than 50 million developers every month.

When I asked Jeff the reasoning behind this particular project, he came back with four:

  1. The impetus for the idea was a Stack Exchange question regarding the Thai script and its possible relation to Sanskrit. I think this was in the Linguistics stack. I browsed around for the Thai language stack… and it didn’t exist!
  2. Also, very high quality resources such as thai-language.com have a forum but they are not used much.
  3. Third is that while it seems everyone is on Facebook and there is good discussion, search and indexing of conversations is very poor. It’s fine for keeping up with recent activity, but older topics that might be relevant on into the future are hard to find.
  4. Stack Exchange isn’t perfect but it has been very helpful to me on a number of topics, and doesn’t require an account to read, unlike Quora.

So, just how does this work?

The goal is to come up with at least 40 questions that embody the topic’s scope. When at least 40 questions have a score of at least ten net votes (up minus down), then the proposal is considered “defined.”

And to do just that, first do a quick walk through the Stack Exchange Tour, then go to Area51: Thai Language Stack Exchange.

Share Button
Older posts