A Woman Learning Thai...and some men too ;)

Learn Thai Language & Thai Culture

Tag: Free downloads (page 1 of 2)

Happy Birthday Bab.la! – Celebrating TEN Years and TEN Days!

Happy Birthday Bab.la

Happy Birthday Bab.la!…

What better way to spend a lazy Sunday than by passing on birthday congrats? Ten years and ten days ago, Bab.la launched the Top 100 Language Lovers Competition (amongst other important things).

About Bab.la: The language portal bab.la is a free online platform for language lovers and an online community of global citizens. We have 44 dictionaries for 28 languages, blog articles about life abroad, language games and quizzes, verb conjugation for 12 languages, phrase books for university, business or travel, an internship platform and many other language-related products.

In April 2015 bab.la joined the Oxford Dictionaries family when Oxford University Press became our parent company. Oxford and bab.la share a vision and mission to deliver quality language-related content to a global community.

In 2017, bab.la launched its online magazine Living Abroad for young multilingual expats coming to grips with life in a foreign country.

Bab.la also gave us the Bloggers Abroad competition, the Language World Cup competition, and … as already mentioned … [drumroll] … the Top 100 Language Lovers Competition.

Ten years. Talk about staying power! Each year Bab.la scours the internet for the best of the best, and then painstakingly has to decide which ones make the final cut. Ouch. That can’t be easy.

Bottom line, the competition serves as an inspiring platform for language lovers (via blogs, twitter, Youtube, and Facebook) to strut their stuff. And inspiring, it is.

I’ve always imagined that the criteria for entry into the competition is along the lines of “what have you done for the language world lately”. That’s how I look at it anyway. And with that in mind, each year I use the Top 100 LL Competition to spiff up WLT.

For 2017 it’s freebies for everyone (for details, check out Please Vote THAI | 2017: Top 100 Language Lovers Competition). I’ve also decided to share my new toy, Flashcards Deluxe!

WLT has a LOT of free audio files for download (recorded with a native speaker) but that still leaves people having to put in work before they can play. Fiddling files is an often mentioned bane of learning languages, so to make prep time less painful, I’m creating spreadsheet files to suck into Flashcards Deluxe (and Anki, if that’s your poison).

To see what I mean, go to HouseTalk: Learn Basic Thai Cleaning Instructions* (more will appear during the giveaway and after). And there you have it. Fiddle free files for 2017.

So bottoms up to Bab.la’s TEN years and TEN days! Thank you so much for inspiring me yet again!

Website (English): bab.la
Google+: +babla
Facebook: babla.languages
Instagram: babla.languages
Dictionary (En-Th): English-Thai
Twitter: @babla (great fun to be had here)

Please vote Thai…

Top Language Lovers 2017If you haven’t voted please click on the Top 100 Language Learning logo to your right. Thanks in advance!

Pssst… thanks also goes to clipartfox.com for their ten candle cake :)

Share Button

Please Vote THAI | 2017: Top 100 Language Lovers Competition

Top 100 Language Lovers of 2017

Pleeeeease vote Thai…

Top Language Lovers 2017The Top 100 Language Lovers Competition is here once again! If you want to get straight to voting, just click the logo to the right.

The Top 100 Language Lovers Competition, hosted by the amazing team from bab.la and Lexiophiles, is where WLT pits Thai against other languages such as English, Chinese, French, German, etc. Scary.

When the call goes out, almost a thousand blogs, twitter accounts, Facebook pages and YouTube accounts are submitted to the hardworking competition team who then whittle the count down to a mere 100 in each section.

This year five Thai resources made the cut: Language Learning Blogs (A Women Learning Thai), Language Facebook Pages (Learn Thai with พร, Thai Language Hut, Wondrous Thai), Language Twitter Accounts (0 Thai entries), and Language YouTube Channels (Adam Bradshaw).

Competition rules: You get one vote per section (for a total of four votes).

I hope you can help out as every vote for Thai puts the Thai language that bit closer to the top. Ta in advance!

And now for WLT’s FREE Thai giveaways…

In past Language Lovers Competitions I’ve celebrated with free draws but for WLT’s ninth year, I wanted to do something different. Instead of a select few winners getting free stuff, thanks to the sponsors below, everyone will be a winner.

PickupThai Podcast: Anki flashcard decks to go with select courses. Each lesson comes with two decks (Thai script and transliteration). Audio included in the decks.

Duke Language School and Arthit: One chapter from each of Duke’s Journey books (1-3) created by Arthit. Bingo-Lingo’s DLS String Method from Arthit’s Read Thai In 10 Days ebook. Audio downloads included with both.

Paiboon Publishing: Audio files for Benjawan Becker’s Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced vocabulary lists (mentioned on WLT’s Thai Frequency Lists with English Definitions).

L-Lingo: 1000 top Thai words with sentences from their recent course update (English, Thai script, and transliteration). Audio downloads included.

Learn Thai with พร: Compilation of Wannaporn Muangkham’s popular series, 65 Thai Useful Thai Phrases You Won’t find in a Phrasebook. Audio downloads included.

Quick & Dirty Thai: I’ve also taken this opportunity to update Quick & Dirty Thai. And yes, audio downloads will be included here as well.

And there you have it – plenty of free stuff for everyone.

Please vote Thai…

Top Language Lovers 2017If you haven’t voted please click on the TLL (Top 100 Language Lovers) competition logo to your right. Thanks in advance!

Share Button

Introducing Tamago: PickUpThai’s E-Picture Book for Learning Thai

PickUpThai Podcast

It’s here! After putting in loads of time and having a heap of fun while she was at it, Yuki from PickUpThai released Tamago, a colourfully designed picture ebook for learning Thai.

Tamago comes with a LOT of stuff! The book comes in two formats, PDF and Kindle. There are cute books for each version (Thai, transliteration, and English), a plain pdf English with translations, plus three different sound sets (the story, extra sentences and vocabulary).

The Thai PDF version starts out with the story in Thai, then the vocabulary with English translations, followed by the story in English only, and ending with extra phrases to use the sentence patterns. The Kindle version is different in that the story is shown once and when you double click the Thai text the English translation for each paragraph appears in a pop-up text box. A sample is shown below.

PickUpThai

Who is it for: This picture book is particularly made for non-Thai adults learning the Thai language (beginner to intermediate), especially those who learn better visually with images. However, the story was written and the illustrations were deliberately created to also appeal to children. Since the book is bilingual, Thai children can learn English from it as easily as non-Thai speaking kids can use it to learn Thai.

Difficulty: The story is written at an intermediate level using mostly simple vocabulary and simple, short, sentences. The vocabulary is correspondingly basic, and drawn from everyday life situations. But learners will still find a few more complex sentences and complicated vocabulary words included to challenge them, maintain their interest, and help build their skills.

Prices:
Thai Script: $9.99
Transliteration: $9.99
Thai Script & Transliteration: $15.99

NOTE: Sample pages for each version (Thai script, Transliteration and English) with audio files can be downloaded from Tamago: E-Picture Book for Learning Thai.

Website: PickupThai
YouTube: PickupThai
Facebook: PickUpThai
twitter: @PickupThai

Share Button

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Essential Verbs: Present, Past, Future

The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation…

Just do it!
– Nike slogan

With Thai verbs, there is some good news, and some really good news.

The Good news…

Unlike English verbs, and verbs from all Romance languages as well as so many other languages around the world, Thai verbs don’t change with the person. There is no “I go”, “You go” “He goes”. It is all just “go”. You’ll never have to learn a Thai verb conjugation.

The really good news…

You will never have to learn different endings for Thai verbs for person, or for present, past, and future tenses. And there are no such things as irregular Thai verbs. You’ll have to learn a few Thai words that will help with time stamps, and some simple time words like today, yesterday, and tomorrow, that will help us know when an action is taking place, but compared to conjugations, they’re a piece of cake.

Who said Thai was difficult?

We will be giving examples of verbs in sentences by using a list of frequently used verbs. An old colleague of mine, Professor Steve Tripp of the University of Aizu in Japan, has done some interesting computer based language analysis. He used an algorithm to parse the Internet and came up with an English verb frequency list. It is a huge list but we’ll use only some of the most used verbs for our examples.

Here is a list of our verbs and their Thai equivalents. When there are synonyms in Thai we’ll give them too.

go: ไป /bpai/
do: ทำ /tam/
think: คิด /kít/ (ว่า /wâa/, ถึง /tĕung/), นึก /néuk/ (ว่า /wâa/, ถึง /tĕung/)
get: ได้ /dâai/ ได้รับ /dâai ráp/, เอา /ao/
know: ทราบ /sâap/
be: เป็น /bpen/, อยู่ /yòo/, คือ /keu/
want: ต้องการ /dtông gaan/, อยาก /yàak/
look: ดู /doo/
come: มา /maa/
try: ลอง /long/, พยายาม /pá-yaa-yaam/
say พูด,ว่า pôot , wâa
make: ทำ /tam/, สร้าง /sâang/
would: คงจะ /kong jà/
see: ดู /doo/
work: งาน /ngaan/
have: มี /mee/
could: ได้ /dâai/
talk: พูด /pôot/, คุย /kui/
eat: กิน /gin/, ทาน /taan/
study: เรียน /rian/
play: เล่น /lên/
read: อ่าน /àan/

Examples of some “really good news”…

If you only read this section you’ll have Thai verbs down. We’ll use the verb at the top of our frequency list “to go” – ไป / bpai /

I go – ฉัน ไป /chăn bpai/
He goes – เขา ไป /kăo bpai/
We go – เรา ไป /rao bpai/
She goes – เธอ ไป /ter bpai/

And (context or “time words” will tell us the tense).

I go – ฉัน ไป /chăn bpai/
I went – ฉัน ไป /chăn bpai/
I will go – ฉัน ไป /chăn bpai/
I am going – ฉัน ไป /chăn bpai/

Okay, there is a little more to it, but in fact, the above are all correct and would be understood depending on the context in which they were spoken.

Simple Present Tense…

Some time-words for simple present tense

usually: ตามปรกติ /dtaam bpròk-gà-dtì/
often: บ่อย /bòi/, บ่อยครั้ง /bòr-yá-kráng/
never: ไม่เคย /mâi koie/
sometimes: บางครั้ง /baang kráng/
every day: ทุกวัน /túk wan/
every year: ทุกปี /túk bpee/
(in the) winter: (ช่วง) ฤดูหนาว /(chûang) réu-doo năao/
currently: ขณะนี้ /kà-nà née/
on the weekends: วันหยุดสุดสัปดาห์ /wan yùt sùt sàp-daa/
in the evening: ตอนเย็น /dton-yen/
in the morning: ตอนเช้า /dton-cháo/
in the afternoon: ตอนบ่าย /dton-bàai/
at night: ตอนกลางคืน /dtor nók laang keun/
now: ตอนนี้ /dton-née/

Verbs used in these examples:

be: เป็น /bpen/, อยู่ /yòo/
do: ทำ /tam/
think: คิด /kít/ (ว่า /wâa/, ถึง /tĕung/), นึก /néuk/ (ว่า /wâa/, ถึง /tĕung/)
get: ได้ /dâai/, เอา /ao/

For underlined timewords to the sections below, download the pdf.

เป็น /bpen/ – to be (+ a noun, a thing):

He’s American.
เขา เป็น ชาว อเมริกัน
kăo bpen chaao a-may-rí-gan

She is a teacher.
เธอ เป็น ครู
ter bpen kroo

I am a volunteer at the school in the afternoon.
ตอนบ่าย ผม เป็น อาสาสมัคร ที่ โรงเรียน
dton-bàai pŏm bpen aa-săa sà-màk têe rohng rian

The boys are football players.
ผู้ชาย เป็น นักฟุตบอล
pôo chaai bpen nák fút-bon

อยู่ /yòo/ – to be (at, in, a place, position):

We are at home every day.
เรา อยู่ ที่ บ้าน ทุกวัน
rao yòo têe bâan túk wan

He is in 6th grade.
เขา อยู่ ชั้น 6
kăo yòo chán hòk

Preecha is in the restaurant now.
ตอนนี้ ปรีชา อยู่ ใน ร้านอาหาร
dton-née bpree-chaa yòo nai ráan aa-hăan

In the morning his daughter is at the office.
ตอนเช้า ลูก สาว อยู่ ที่ทำงาน
dton-cháo lôok săa yòo têe tam gaan

ทำ /tam/ – to do:

He’s does homework in the evening.
เขา ทำ การบ้าน ตอนเย็น
kăo tam gaan bâan dton-yen

She does artwork.
เธอ ทำ ศิลปะ
ter tam sĭn-lá-bpà

We do gardening on the weekends.
เรา ทำ สวน วัน สุดสัปดาห์
rao tam sŭan wan sùt sàp-daa

They currently do office work (work in an office).
ขณะนี้ พวกเขา ทำ งาน ออฟฟิศ
kà-nà née pûak kăo tam ngaan óf-fít

คิด /kít/ (ว่า /wâa/, ถึง /tĕung/), นึก /néuk/ (ว่า /wâa/, ถึง /tĕung/) – to think, to think about:

I think he is handsome.
ฉัน คิดว่า เขา หล่อ
chăn kít wâa kăo lòr

She thinks about a new iPhone often.
เธอ นึกถึง iPhone ใหม่ บ่อย
ter néuk tĕung iPhone mài bòi

Every day He thinks about his guitar.
ทุกวัน เขา คิดถึง กีตาร์ ของ เขา
túk wan kăo kít tĕung gee-dtâa kŏng kăo

We think the new song is difficult.
เรา คิดว่า เพลง ใหม่ ยาก
rao kít wâa playng mài yâak

ได้ /dâai/, ได้รับ /dâai ráp/, เอา /ao/ – to get:

He gets good grades every year.
เขา ได้ เกรด ดี ทุกปี
kăo dâai gràyt dee túk bpee

The children get flu shots in the winter.
เด็ก ๆ ได้ ยาฉีด ป้องกัน ไข้หวัดใหญ่ ช่วง ฤดูหนาว
dèk dèk dâai yaa chèet bpông gan kâi wàt yài chûang réu-doo năao

My teacher gets fried rice every day.
ครู เอา ข้าวผัด ทุกวัน
kroo ao kâao pàt túk wan

She frequently gets a new iPhone.
เธอ ได้ iPhone ใหม่ บ่อยครั้ง
ter dâai iPhone mài bòie-kráng

Past Tense…

(These may include what in English we call present and past perfect tenses.)

The use of the words ได้ and ยัง for negative past.

There is a special past-tense-helper in the Thai word ได้, especially used with negative sentences. The pattern is (person + ไม่ ได้ + verb).

I didn’t go.
ฉัน ไม่ ได้ ไป
chăn mâi dâai bpai

She didn’t eat.
เธอ ไม่ ได้ กิน
ter mâi dâai gin

We didn’t see the movie.
เรา ไม่ ได้ ดู หนัง
rao mâi dâai doo năng

We can also add the concept of “not yet” by using the word ยัง. The pattern is (person + ยัง ไม่ ได้ + verb).

I didn’t go yet.
ฉัน ยัง ไม่ ได้ ไป
chăn yang mâi dâai bpai

She didn’t eat yet.
เธอ ยัง ไม่ ได้ กิน
ter yang mâi dâai gin

We didn’t see the movie yet.
เรา ยัง ไม่ ได้ ดู หนัง
rao yang mâi dâai doo năng

Since Thai verbs don’t change when used in the past tense, we know we are speaking of the past in two ways. One) from context, and Two) From the use of a “past-word”. Since context can sometimes lead to misunderstandings it is best for us learners of Thai to use some “past-words” so that we can be more accurate and better understood.

Some time-words for past tense:

yesterday: เมื่อวานนี้ /mêua waan née/
last week: อาทิตย์ที่แล้ว /aa-tít têe láew/
last year: ปีที่แล้ว /bpee têe láew/
last month: เดือนที่แล้ว /deuan têe láew/
day before yesterday: เมื่อวานซืนนี้ /mêua waan-seun née/
this morning: เมื่อเช้านี้ /mêua cháo née/
in the evening: ตอนเย็น /dton-yen/
last night: เมื่อคืน /mêua keun/
in former times: สมัยก่อน /sà-măi gòn/, ในอดีต /nai a-dèet/
when …: เมื่อ … /mêua …/
before: ก่อน /gòn /
after: หลังจาก /lăng jàak /
used to: เคย /koie/
already: แล้ว /láew/

Verbs used in these examples:

try: ลอง /long/, พยายาม /pá-yaa-yaam/
say: พูด /pôot/, ว่า /wâa/, บอกว่า /bòk wâa/
make: ทำ /tam/, สร้าง /sâang/
eat: กิน /gin/, ทาน /taan/
study: เรียน /rian/
play: เล่น /lên/
read: อ่าน /àan/

Note: Download the pdf to see the underlined time-words.

Aree wanted a puppy when she was a girl.
อารีย์ ต้องการ (อยาก ได้) ลูก สุนัข (ลูก หมา) เมื่อ เธอ เป็น สาว
aa-ree dtông gaan (yàak dâai) lôok sù-nák (lôok măa) mêua ter bpen săao

We looked at the sunset yesterday (in the) afternoon.
เรา ดู พระอาทิตย์ ตก เมื่อวานนี้ ตอนบ่าย
rao doo prá aa-tít dtòk mêua waan née dton-bàai

Manee and Lek came (returned) late last night.
มณี และ เล็ก มา (กลับ มา) ดึก เมื่อคืน
má-nee láe lék maa (glàp maa) dèuk mêua keun

The students tried the new noodle shop after school (ended).
นักเรียน ลอง ร้าน ก๋วยเตี๋ยว ใหม่ หลังจาก เลิก เรียน
nák rian long ráan gŭay-dtĭeow mài lăng jàak lêrk rian

This morning she said she wanted fried eggs for breakfast.
เมื่อเช้านี้ เธอ บอกว่า เธอ อยาก ทาน ไข่ ทอด เป็น อาหาร เช้า
mêua cháo née ter bòk wâa ter yàak taan kài tôt bpen aa hăan cháo

In former times (in the past) the workers made (built) a wall around the city.
ในใสมัยก่อน (ในอดีต) คน งาน ทำ (สร้าง) กำแพง รอบ เมือง
nai săi mai gòn (nai a-dèet) kon ngaan tam (sâang) gam-paeng rôp meuang

We ate before we studied.
เรา กิน ก่อน เรา เรียน
rao gin gòn rao rian

She studied after she played video games.
เธอ เรียน หลังจาก เธอ เล่น วิดีโอเกม
ter rian lăng jàak ter lên wí-dee-oh gaym

The children used to play football in the evening.
เด็ก เคย เล่น ฟุตบอล ตอนเย็น
dèk koie lên fút bon dton-yen

I already read that book.
ผม ได้ อ่าน หนังสือ เล่ม นั้น แล้ว
pŏm dâai àan năng-sĕu lêm nán láew

Caveat: In the sentence เรา กิน ก่อน เรา เรียน /rao gin gòn rao rian/ (we translated it as “we ate before we studied”) the possibility of misunderstanding can arise.

The sentence เรา กิน ก่อน เรา เรียน /rao gin gòn rao rian/ could be translated as:

We ate before we studied.
We will eat before we study.
We eat (every day) before studying.

It a situation like this we may have to depend on the context in which we are speaking to know which one is correct. Yes, Thai verbs might be easier to navigate than English verbs but because they are less specific, sometimes misunderstandings can occur.

One way to deal with this problem is to add another time-word to clear things up.

We already ate before we studied.
เรา กิน แล้ว ก่อน เรา เรียน
rao gin láew gòn rao rian

We will eat before we study.
เรา จะ กิน ก่อน เรา เรียน
rao jà gin gòn rao rian

(The word จะ /jà/ is a future word we will get to below)

We eat every day before we study.
เรา กิน ทุกวัน ก่อน เรา เรียน
rao gin túk wan gòn rao rian

Future Tense…

Some time-words for future tense:

The most important time-word for future in English is “will” and in Thai its equivalent is จะ /jà/. Almost all future sentences will contain the pattern จะ /jà/ + verb.

tomorrow: พรุ่งนี้ /prûng-née/
tomorrow morning: พรุ่งนี้เช้า /prûng-née cháo/
this afternoon: บ่ายนี้ /bàai née/
this evening: เย็นนี้ /yen née/
tonight: คืนนี้ /keun née/
next week: สัปดาห์หน้า /sàp-daa nâa/
next month: เดือนหน้า /deuan nâa/
next year: ปีหน้า /bpee nâa/
in two weeks: ในอีกสองสัปดาห์ /nai èek sŏng sàp-daa/
day after tomorrow: วันมะรืนนี้ /wan má-reun née/

Verbs used in these examples:

come: มา /maa/
eat: กิน /gin/, ทาน /taan/
study: เรียน /rian/
play: เล่น /lên/
be: เป็น /bpen/, อยู่ /yòo/
do: ทำ /tam/
get: ได้ /dâai/, เอา /ao/
try: ลอง /long/, พยายาม /pá-yaa-yaam/
make: ทำ /tam/, สร้าง /sâang/

Again, to see the underlined time-words, download the pdf.

Our relatives are coming tomorrow.
ญาติ ของ เรา จะ มา พรุ่งนี้
yâat kŏng rao jà maa prûng-née

Tomorrow morning she will eat eggs and toast.
พรุ่งนี้เช้า เธอ จะ กิน ไข่ และ ขนมปังปิ้ง
prûng-née cháo ter jà gin kài láe kà-nŏm bpang bpîng

I am studying English this afternoon.
บ่ายนี้ ฉัน จะ เรียน ภาษาอังกฤษ
bàai née chăn jà rian paa-săa ang-grìt

They are going to play football this evening.
เย็นนี้ พวกเขา จะ เล่น ฟุตบอล
yen née pûak kăo jà lên fút bon

She wants to be a doctor.
เธอ อยาก จะ เป็น หมอ
ter yàak jà bpen mŏr

The day after tomorrow she will be in Bangkok.
วันมะรืนนี้ เธอ จะ อยู่ กรุงเทพฯ
wan má-reun née ter jà yòo grung tâyp

Sunee will do her homework tonight.
สุนีย์ จะ ทำ การบ้าน คืนนี้
sù-nee jà tam gaan bâan keun née

Next week Somchai is getting a new motorcycle.
สัปดาห์หน้า สมชาย จะ ได้ รถจักรยานยนต์ ใหม่
sàp-daa nâa sŏm-chaai jà dâai rót jàk-grà-yaan yon mài

I’ll try to visit you next month.
เดือนหน้า ฉัน จะ พยายาม เยี่ยม คุณ
deuan nâa chăn jà pá-yaa-yaam yîam kun

I won’t make a mistake.
ฉัน จะ ไม่ ทำผิด
chăn jà mâi tam pìt

Present continuous tense…

The present continuous tense in English is one way we can say what is happening “now”. To create this tense in Thai we use the pattern กำลัง /gam-lang/ + verb.

Now:

He is working at the factory.
เขา กำลัง ทำงาน ที่ โรงงาน
kăo gam-lang tam ngaan têe rohng ngaan

She is studying English.
เธอ กำลัง เรียน ภาษา อังกฤษ
ter gam-lang rian paa-săa ang-grìt

They are playing video games.
พวกเขา กำลัง เล่น วิดีโอเกม
pûak kăo gam-lang lên wí-dee-oh gaym

If we add the word อยู่ to the pattern, giving us กำลัง + verb + อยู่ it adds the concept “right now”, “at this moment”.

Right Now:

Manit is eating dinner (right now).
มานิต กำลัง ทาน อาหารเย็น อยู่
maa-nít gam-lang taan aa-hăan yen yòo

Sunee is practicing piano (at this moment).
สุนีย์ กำลัง เล่น เปียโน อยู่
sù-nee gam-lang lên bpia noh yòo

I am working on the computer (right now).
ฉัน กำลัง ทำงาน คอมพิวเตอร์ อยู่
chăn gam-lang tam ngaan kom-piw-dtêr yòo

Future using กำลัง /gam-lang/:

As with the present continuous tense in English the same pattern can indicate a future time (“I’m going now”, “I’m going tomorrow”). To do this in Thai we need add the future word จะ /jà/. The pattern is กำลัง /gam-lang/+ จะ /jà/ + verb.

The girls are going to come tomorrow.
สาว ๆ กำลัง จะ มา พรุ่งนี้
săao săao gam-lang jà maa prûng-née

The policeman is going to get a new car next month.
ตำรวจ กำลัง จะ ได้ รถ ใหม่ เดือนหน้า
dtam-rùat gam-lang jà dâai rót mài deuan nâa

The students are going to (go to) school this morning.
นักเรียน กำลัง จะ ไป โรงเรียน เช้านี้
nák rian gam-lang jà bpai rohng rian cháo née

Vocabulary used in the chapter…

กลับ /glàp/ to return
กำแพง /gam-paeng/ wall
กีตาร์ /gee-dtâa/ guitar
เกรด /gràyt/ grade (English loan word)
ขนมปังปิ้ง /kà-nŏm bpang bpîng/ toast
ไข้หวัดใหญ่ /kâi wàt yài/ flu
ครู /kroo / teacher
คอมพิวเตอร์ /kom-piw-dtêr/ computer (English loan word)
ชั้น /chán/ level (school grade)
ชาว /chaao/ person of
ญาติ /yâat/ family relation
ดู หนัง /doo năng/ to go to (see) a movie
ทำผิด /tam pìt/ to make a mistake
ที่ทำงาน /têe tam gaan/ place of work, office
ป้องกัน /bpông gan/ protect (from)
พระอาทิตย์ตก /prá aa-tít dtòk/ sunset
เพลง /playng/ song
เมือง /meuang/ city, town
ยาก /yâak/ difficult
ยาฉีด /yaa chèet/ injection, inoculation
เยี่ยม /yîam/ to visit
รถจักรยานยนต์ /rót jàk-grà-yaan yon/ motorcycle
รอบ /rôp/ around
ร้าน ก๋วยเตี๋ยว /ráan gŭay-dtĭeow/ noodle shop
โรงงาน /rohng ngaan/ factory
ลูก สุนัข (ลูก หมา) /lôok sù-nák (lôok măa) puppy
ศิลปะ /sĭn-lá-bpà art/ art
สวน /sŭan/ garden
หมอ /mŏr / doctor
หล่อ /lòr/ handsome
ออฟฟิศ /óf-fít/ office (English loan word)
อาสาสมัคร /aa-săa sà-màk/ volunteer

Examples of verbs in sentences…

เขา เป็น ชาว อเมริกัน
kăo bpen chaao a-may-rí-gan

เธอ เป็น ครู
ter bpen kroo

ตอนบ่าย ผม เป็น อาสาสมัคร ที่ โรงเรียน
dton-bàai pŏm bpen aa-săa sà-màk têe rohng rian

ผู้ชาย เป็น นักฟุตบอล
pôo chaai bpen nák fút-bon

เรา อยู่ ที่ บ้าน ทุกวัน
rao yòo têe bâan túk wan

เขา อยู่ ชั้น 6
kăo yòo chán hòk

ตอนนี้ ปรีชา อยู่ ใน ร้านอาหาร
dton-née bpree-chaa yòo nai ráan aa-hăan

ตอนเช้า ลูก สาว อยู่ ที่ทำงาน
dton-cháo lôok săa yòo têe tam gaan

เขา ทำ การบ้าน ตอนเย็น
kăo tam gaan bâan dton-yen

เธอ ทำ ศิลปะ
ter tam sĭn-lá-bpà

เรา ทำ สวน วัน สุดสัปดาห์
rao tam sŭan wan sùt sàp-daa

ขณะนี้ พวกเขา ทำ งาน ออฟฟิศ
kà-nà née pûak kăo tam ngaan óf-fít

ฉัน คิดว่า เขา หล่อ
chăn kít wâa kăo lòr

เธอ นึกถึง iPhone ใหม่ บ่อย
ter néuk tĕung iPhone mài bòi

ทุกวัน เขา คิดถึง กีตาร์ ของ เขา
túk wan kăo kít tĕung gee-dtâa kŏng kăo

เรา คิดว่า เพลง ใหม่ ยาก
rao kít wâa playng mài yâak

เขา ได้ เกรด ดี ทุกปี
kăo dâai gràyt dee túk bpee

เด็ก ๆ ได้ ยาฉีด ป้องกัน ไข้หวัดใหญ่ ช่วง ฤดูหนาว
dèk dèk dâai yaa chèet bpông gan kâi wàt yài chûang réu-doo năao

ครู เอา ข้าวผัด ทุกวัน
kroo ao kâao pàt túk wan

เธอ ได้ iPhone ใหม่ บ่อยครั้ง
ter dâai iPhone mài bòr-yá-kráng

ฉัน ไม่ ได้ ไป
chăn mâi dâai bpai

เธอ ไม่ ได้ กิน
ter mâi dâai gin

เรา ไม่ ได้ ดู หนัง
rao mâi dâai doo năng

ฉัน ยัง ไม่ ได้ ไป
chăn yang mâi dâai bpai

เธอ ยัง ไม่ ได้ กิน
ter yang mâi dâai gin

เรา ยัง ไม่ ได้ ดู หนัง
rao yang mâi dâai doo năng

อารีย์ ต้องการ (อยาก ได้) ลูก สุนัข (ลูก หมา) เมื่อ เธอ เป็น สาว
aa-ree dtông gaan (yàak dâai) lôok sù-nák (lôok măa) mêua ter bpen săao

เรา ดู พระอาทิตย์ ตก เมื่อวานนี้ ตอนบ่าย
rao doo prá aa-tít dtòk mêua waan née dton-bàai

มณี และ เล็ก มา (กลับ มา) ดึก เมื่อคืน
má-nee láe lék maa (glàp maa) dèuk mêua keun

นักเรียน ลอง ร้าน ก๋วยเตี๋ยว ใหม่ หลังจาก เลิก เรียน
nák rian long ráan gŭay-dtĭeow mài lăng jàak lêrk rian

เมื่อเช้านี้ เธอ บอกว่า เธอ อยาก ทาน ไข่ ทอด เป็น อาหาร เช้า
mêua cháo née ter bòk wâa ter yàak taan kài tôt bpen aa hăan cháo

ในใสมัยก่อน (ในอดีต) คน งาน ทำ (สร้าง) กำแพง รอบ เมือง
nai săi mai gòn (nai a-dèet) kon ngaan tam (sâang) gam-paeng rôp meuang

เรา กิน ก่อน เรา เรียน
rao gin gòn rao rian

เธอ เรียน หลังจาก เธอ เล่น วิดีโอเกม
ter rian lăng jàak ter lên wí-dee-oh gaym

เด็ก เคย เล่น ฟุตบอล ตอนเย็น
dèk koie lên fút bon dton-yen

ผม ได้ อ่าน หนังสือ เล่ม นั้น แล้ว
pŏm dâai àan năng-sĕu lêm nán láew

เรา กิน แล้ว ก่อน เรา เรียน
rao gin láew gòn rao rian

เรา จะ กิน ก่อน เรา เรียน
rao jà gin gòn rao rian

เรา กิน ทุกวัน ก่อน เรา เรียน
rao gin túk wan gòn rao rian

ญาติ ของ เรา จะ มา พรุ่งนี้
yâat kŏng rao jà maa prûng-née

พรุ่งนี้เช้า เธอ จะ กิน ไข่ และ ขนมปังปิ้ง
prûng-née cháo ter jà gin kài láe kà-nŏm bpang bpîng

บ่ายนี้ ฉัน จะ เรียน ภาษาอังกฤษ
bàai née chăn jà rian paa-săa ang-grìt

เย็นนี้ พวกเขา จะ เล่น ฟุตบอล
yen née pûak kăo jà lên fút bon

เธอ อยาก จะ เป็น หมอ
ter yàak jà bpen mŏr

วันมะรืนนี้ เธอ จะ อยู่ กรุงเทพฯ
wan má-reun née ter jà yòo grung tâyp

สุนีย์ จะ ทำ การบ้าน คืนนี้
sù-nee jà tam gaan bâan keun née

สัปดาห์หน้า สมชาย จะ ได้ รถจักรยานยนต์ ใหม่
sàp-daa nâa sŏm-chaai jà dâai rót jàk-grà-yaan yon mài

เดือนหน้า ฉัน จะ พยายาม เยี่ยม คุณ
deuan nâa chăn jà pá-yaa-yaam yîam kun

ฉัน จะ ไม่ ทำผิด
chăn jà mâi tam pìt

เขา กำลัง ทำงาน ที่ โรงงาน
kăo gam-lang tam ngaan têe rohng ngaan

เธอ กำลัง เรียน ภาษา อังกฤษ
ter gam-lang rian paa-săa ang-grìt

พวกเขา กำลัง เล่น วิดีโอเกม
pûak kăo gam-lang lên wí-dee-oh gaym

มานิต กำลัง ทาน อาหารเย็น อยู่
maa-nít gam-lang taan aa-hăan yen yòo

สุนีย์ กำลัง เล่น เปียโน อยู่
sù-nee gam-lang lên bpia noh yòo

ฉัน กำลัง ทำงาน คอมพิวเตอร์ อยู่
chăn gam-lang tam ngaan kom-piw-dtêr yòo

สาว ๆ กำลัง จะ มา พรุ่งนี้
săao săao gam-lang jà maa prûng-née

ตำรวจ กำลัง จะ ได้ รถ ใหม่ เดือนหน้า
dtam-rùat gam-lang jà dâai rót mài deuan nâa

นักเรียน กำลัง จะ ไป โรงเรียน เช้านี้
nák rian gam-lang jà bpai rohng rian cháo née

Audio and Pdf Downloads…

Docx download (without transliteration): Verbs
Pdf download (with transliteration): Verbs
Audio download: Verbs Audio

Share Button

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Thai Personal Pronouns

The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation…

She loves you, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
-The Beatles, She Loves You

The topic of Thai pronouns can be a daunting one. We will try to work with the basics here, just scratching the surface, while giving a taste of how very wide ranging this topic can be. But when it comes to learning Thai personal pronouns, especially compared to English pronouns, there is some good news, and some bad news.

Sorry but it is necessary to talk just a little grammar here.

With English pronouns we have what are called the nominative case and the objective case. One pronoun acts like the subject of a sentence, and the other acts like the object.

Here is what we are talking about.

English pronouns:

I/Me
We/Us
They/Them
He/Him
She/Her
Who/Whom
You

And here is how they are different:

I saw the cat. The cat saw me.
We paid for the dinner. He paid for us.
He ate the shark. They shark ate him.
She cooked the fish. The fish was cooked by her.
Who sent the letter? To whom would you like to send a letter?
You did something. Something was done to you (the grammar gods felt a little compassion for us by giving us just one).

The nominative case pronoun does stuff. The objective case pronoun gets stuff done to it (often with the help of a preposition like “to”, “for”, “by”, etc.).

Okay, English grammar lesson is over.

The good news.

The Thai language doesn’t have two pronouns for each person. They don’t break down into nominative and objective cases. So, you only have to learn one pronoun case for each person. Thanks for little victories.

The bad news.

I have counted least 27 different words for “I” in Thai, plus lots of other ways to refer to yourself. “You” is a little better with only a dozen words or so. All the rest are just as bad.

Thai Pronouns:

Lots of words like “uncle”, “auntie”, “big brother”, “teacher”, “sir”, “boss”, etc., although grammatically common nouns, are also used as pronouns ( for I, you, he, she, etc., etc.) There are countless of these and we look at some but will not be able to give examples of all of them.

We will give the most common and easy to use pronouns with examples. We will also give some other ways to say the same pronouns.

As with so much in the Thai language, the choice of words we use is dependent on who is talking to whom.

It is best to listen for all these other pronouns in Thai people’s normal conversations and learn how they are used and with whom, and in what situations. Later when you are sure of the relationship and the situation you can try some of these out in your own conversations. But be prepared for a few normal faux pas along the way.

The Null Pronoun:

After you have learned the many pronouns here, be aware that Thais in conversation can simply just leave out pronouns. The context of the sentence will tell them who is doing and whom it is being done to.

Examples:

จะไปตลาด
jà bpai dtà-làat
Going to the market.
(someone is going to the market)

จะซื้อให้
jà séu hâi
Will buy it for …
(someone is buying something for someone)

The Thais will know who and whom, and so will you after a while.

But let’s start with the simple stuff.

ผม, ดิฉัน, ฉัน /pŏm, dì-chăn, chăn/ – “I/Me”:

These three “I/Me” pronouns are the ones that we probably use most. They are basic and will allow you to say just about anything in referring to yourself.

ผม /pŏm/ – used by male speakers:

When a man is speaking.

ผม เห็น สมบัติ ที่ ตลาด
pŏm hĕn sŏm-bàt têe dtà-làat
I saw Sombat at the market.

มาลี คุย กับ ผม ที่ ห้างสรรพสินค้า
maa-lee kui gàp pŏm têe hâang sàp sĭn káa
Malee spoke with me at the shopping mall.

ผม จะ เล่น เปีย โน
pŏm jà lên bpia noh
I’m going to play the piano.

ครู ให้ ผม “A” ใน ทดสอบ
kroo hâi pŏm “A” nai tót sòp
The teacher gave me an “A” on the test.

Note: The word ผม /pŏm/ can sometimes be seen as a bit formal. If you are talking to a close friend you might want to use one of the “other ways to refer to yourself” discussed below.

ดิฉัน (ดีฉัน) /dì-chăn/ – used by female speakers:

When a woman is talking (in a fairly formal setting)

ดิฉัน จะ แต่งงาน กับ คุณ ปรีชา
dì-chăn jà dtàeng ngaan gàp kun bpree-chaa
I’m going to marry Preecha.

คุณ ปรีชา จะ แต่งงาน กับ ดิฉัน
kun bpree-chaa jà dtàeng ngaan gàp dì-chăn
Preecha is going to marry me.

อยาก ไป ช้อปปิ้ง กับ ดิฉัน ไหม
yàak bpai chóp-bpîng gàp dì-chăn măi
Would you like to go shopping with me?

ดิฉัน เคย ทาน อาหาร กลางวัน ที่ ร้าน อาหาร ฝรั่งเศส
dì-chăn koie taan aa hăan glaang wan têe ráan aa hăan fà-ràng-sàyt
I have had lunch at that French restaurant.

Note: The word ดิฉัน is quite formal. If you are talking to people you know, of the same social status, or lower, you can use ฉัน or you might want to use one of the “other ways to refer to yourself” discussed below.

ฉัน /chăn/ – used by females in an informal setting—also used by males with intimate friends or paramours:

You can substitute ฉัน in any of the above mentioned sentences instead of ผม and ดิฉัน if the situation is informal and you are talking with friends.

ฉัน จะ ซื้อ รถ ใหม่
chăn jà séu rót mài
I’m going to buy a new car.

สุมาลี ซื้อ อาหารกลางวัน ให้ ฉัน
sù maa-lee séu aa-hăan glaang-wan hâi chăn
Sumalee bought me lunch.

คุณ อยาก จะ ไป ดู หนัง กับ ฉัน ไหม
kun yàak jà bpai doo năng gàp chăn măi
Do you want to go to the movies with me?

ฉัน สอบ ได้
chăn sòp dâai
I passed the test.

เมื่อวาน สุขใจ โทร หา ฉัน
mêua waan sùk-kà-jai toh hăa chăn
Yesterday Sukjai called me (on the phone).

And then you can have more intimate conversations:

ฉัน รัก เธอ
chăn rák ter
I love you.

Using your own name:

Often using the above three words for “I” might sound a bit distant. When a person, especially a woman but not exclusively, wants to sound a bit more familiar he/she can use their own name as a pronoun for “I”.

น้อย รัก แดง
nói rák daeng
Literally: “Noi loves Dang” but really means “I love you.”

Some other ways to say “I”:

  • พี่ /pêe/ – literally “older” brother or sister but is often used as “I” informally when you are older than the person you are talking to.
  • น้อง /nóng/ – literally “younger” brother or sister but is often used as “I” informally when you are younger than the person you are talking to.
  • หนู /nŏo/ – Usually used by women when a they are much younger than the person they are talking to.
  • เค้า /káo/ – very informal when speaking to a close friend. เค้า / káo / is the “I” paired with ตัว / dtua / for “you”

And then there’s…

ข้าพเจ้า /kâa-pá-jâo/ – when writing or speaking formally
ข้า, ข้าเจ้า /kâa, kâa jâo/ – abbreviation for ข้าพเจ้า
เจ้า /jâo/ – poetic
หม่อมฉัน /mòm chăn/ – used when speaking to royalty
อาตมา /àat-maa/ – used by monks
กู /goo/ – old form, today considered overly familiar, except with close friends
ข้าพระพุทธเจ้า /kâa prá-pút-tá-jâo/ – highly formal
ลูกช้าง /lôok cháang/ – your humble servant 
อิฉัน /i-chăn/ – female speakers in a formal setting
อาตมภาพ /aa dtom pâap/ – used by a monk
อัญขยม /an-yá-kà-yŏm/ – poetic 

คุณ, เธอ /kun, ter/ – “You”:

Although there are many other ways to say “you”, these two are the most popular. The pronoun คุณ /kun/ can be used for just about anyone whereas เธอ /ter/ is usually reserved for close acquaintances or very young ones.

คุณ /kun/

คุณ จะ ไป ไหน
kun jà bpai năi
Where are you going?

ใคร จะ ไป กับ คุณ
krai jà bpai gàp kun
Who is going with you?

คุณ กำลัง ใช้ อินเทอร์เน็ต หรือ เปล่า
kun gam-lang chái in-têr-nét rĕu bplào
Are you using the Internet?

ผม จะ พา คุณ กลับ บ้าน
pŏm jà paa kun glàp bâan
I will take you home.

Note on คุณ /kun/

You find คุณ /kun/ in many places. Besides meaning “you” as we do here, it is part of thank you (ขอบคุณ /kòp kun/), and it is also used as an honorific in front of a person’s name with the meaning of Mr. or Mrs./Miz. It is usually used with a person’s first name.

It is also used as a title for a woman (as in Lady …) in the term คุณหญิง /kun yĭng/, and คุณ /kun/ by itself was at one time a semi royal title.

Unless you are quite close to someone, when using their name we usually add an honorific like Mr., Prof., Older Brother, Auntie, etc. and คุณ / kun / is the most ubiquitous.

CAVEAT: When we want to talk about ourselves we never use the honorific คุณ /kun/. We would never say “my name is คุณ /kun/ Hugh”. I can say I am Uncle Hugh, or Teacher Hugh, or Big Brother Hugh, but never “I am Mr. Hugh.” Others will say it for you but you don’t say it for yourself.

เธอ /ter/

เธอ จะ ชอบ หนัง (เรื่องนี้)
ter jà chôp năng (rêuang née)
You would like the movie.

เพื่อน ของ เธอ ต้องการ ให้ เธอ ร้อง เพลง
pêuan kŏng ter dtông gaan hâi ter róng playng
Your friends wanted you to sing (a song).

เธอ จะ กิน ก๋วยเตี๋ยว วันนี้ ไหม
ter jà gìn gŭay-dtĭeow wan née măi
Will you have noodles today?

ฉัน ใช้ คอม ของ เธอ ได้ ไหม
chăn chái kom kŏng ter dâai măi
Can I use your computer?

Using the person’s name:

When a person wants to sound a bit more familiar he/she can use a person’s name as a pronoun for “you”.

If someone says to you น้อย รัก แดง /nói rák daeng/
(as above) you can answer with:

แดง ก็ รัก น้อย
daeng gôr rák nói
Literally: “Dang loves Noi also” but really means “I love you too.”

Some other ways to say “you”:

  • ท่าน /tâan/ – when speaking to someone with a very high status
  • นาย /naai/ – when speaking to someone of a higher status. The equivalent of “sir” or “boss”.
  • หนู /nŏo/ – used when the person you are talking to is much younger than you are.
  • พี่ /pêe/ – literally “older” brother or sister but is often used as “you” informally for someone older.
  • (คุณ) ลุง /(kun) lung/ – literally “uncle” but is often used as “you” informally for someone much older, possible the age of your father.
  • น้อง /nóng/ – literally “younger” brother or sister but is often used as “you” informally for someone younger
  • (คุณ) ป้า /(kun) bpâa/ – literally “auntie” but is often used as “you” informally for someone much older, possible the age of your mother.
  • แก /gae/ – impolite or colloquial usage
  • ตัว /dtua/ – very informal when speaking to a close friend. เค้า /káo/ is the “I” paired with ตัว /dtua/ for “you”.

Now that the biggies (I and You) are dealt with (albeit just scratching the surface), let’s stick with one Thai pronoun for each of the following (although there are many Thai words for each).

เรา /rao/ – “We/Us” (พวกเรา /pûak rao/ is a synonym for we/us, all of us):

เรา จะ ทาน อาหารกลางวัน ด้วยกัน
rao jà taan aa-hăan glaang-wan dûay gan
We’ll have lunch together.

มาลี เอา ผัก ให้ เรา
maa-lee ao pàk hâi rao
Malee gave the vegetables to us.

เรา ทุกคน เล่น ฟุตบอล
rao túk kon lên fút bon
We all played football.

คุณ ครู จะ สอน เรา วันเสาร์
kun-kroo jà sŏn rao wan săo
The teacher will teach us on Saturday.

เขา /kăo/ “He/She”, often เธอ /ter/ is also used for “She”:

เขา (เธอ) มา เร็ว เสมอ
kăo (ter) maa reo sà-mĕr
She always comes early.

เขา (เธอ) จะ เอา พริก ไหม
kăo (ter) jà ao prík măi
Does he want any chilis?

ให้ โทรศัพท์มือถือ ใหม่(แก่) เธอ
hâi toh-rá-sàp meu tĕu mài (gàe) ter
Give her the new cell phone.

บอก เขา (เธอ) ว่า บ้าน คุณ อยู่ ที่ ไหน
bòk kăo (ter) wâa bâan kun yòo têe năi
Tell him where your house is.

พวกเขา /pûak kăo/ or เขา /kăo/ (for short) – “They/Them”:

The word เขา /kăo/ can mean “he/she/they” but if we use the word พวกเขา /pûak kăo/ (พวก /pûak/ = “group of …”) then we know that it is a plural form so should be translated as “they”.

พวกเขา มา เร็ว เสมอ
pûak kăo maa reo sà-mĕr
They always come early.

พวกเขา จะ เอา พริก ไหม
pûak kăo jà ao prík măi
Do they want any chilis.

ให้ โทรศัพท์มือถืออัน ใหม่ (แก่) พวกเขา
hâi toh-rá-sàp meu tĕu mài (gàe) pûak kăo
Give them new cell phones.

บอก พวกเขา ว่า บ้าน คุณ อยู่ ที่ ไหน
bòk pûak kăo wâa bâan kun yòo têe năi
Tell them where your house is.

Extra Credit:

Here are some sentences using the “other” words that Thais use as pronouns.

ลุง ต้องการ น้ำ เย็น
lung dtông gaan nám yen
Lit: Uncle needs cold water. “I would like some cold water.”

คุณป้า เอา น้ำ เย็น ไหม
kun-bpâa ao nám yen măi
Lit: Does auntie want some cold water? “Would you like some cold water?”

เมื่อไร พี่ จะ มา
mêua rai pêe jà maa
Lit: When is older sister coming? “When are you coming?” or “When is she coming?” or “When are you coming?”

ครู จะ ช่วย หนู
kroo jà chûay nŏo
Lit: The teacher will help the mouse. “I will help you.” or “She will help her.” or “He will help me.”, etc.

นาย จะ ตี กอล์ฟ พรุ่งนี้ ไหม
naai jà dtee góf prûng-née măi
Lit: Will sir (boss) play golf tomorrow? “Will you play golf tomorrow?

ช่วย พี่ หน่อย
chûay pêe nòi
Lit: Please help older brother. “Please help me.” or “Please help him.”, etc.

เค้า กับ ตัว จะ ไป ด้วยกัน
káo gàp dtua jà bpai dûay gan
Lit: He and body will go together. “You and I will go together.”

พี่ จะ เลี้ยง น้อง
pêe jà líang nóng
Lit: Older brother will pay for younger sister. “I’ll pay for you.” or “You will pay for me.” or “She will pay for you”, etc.

Vocabulary used in this post…

กลับ /glàp/ to return
ก๋วยเตี๋ยว /gŭay-dtĭeow/ noodle soup
คอม /kom/ abbre: for computer
คุย /kui/ to talk
ช้อปปิ้ง /chóp-bpîng/ loan word: shopping
ซื้อ /séu/ to buy
ด้วยกัน /dûay gan/ together
ดู หนัง /doo năng/ to watch a movie
ตลาด /dtà-làat/ market
ตี กอล์ฟ /dtee góf/ play golf
แต่งงาน /dtàeng ngaan/ to marry
ทดสอบ /tót sòp/ test, examination
ทุกคน /túk kon/ everyone
โทร /toh/ to call (telephone)
โทรศัพท์ /toh-rá-sàp/ telephone
โทรศัพท์ มือถือ /toh-rá-sàp meu tĕu/ cell phone
เปีย โน / bpia noh/ loan word: piano
ผัก /pàk/ vegetable
พริก /prík/ chili
พรุ่งนี้ /prûng-née/ tomorrow
ฟุตบอล /fút bon/ loan word: football
มือถือ /meu tĕu/ cell phone (hand held)
เมื่อวาน /mêua waan/ yesterday
รถ /rót/ vehicle, car, motorcycle
ร้อง เพลง /róng playng/ to sing (a song)
รัก /rák/ to love
เร็ว /reo/ fast, early
เล่น /lên/ to play
เลี้ยง /líang/ to pay for
วันนี้ /wan née/ today
วันเสาร์ / wan săo/ Saturday
สอน /sŏn/ to teach
สอบ ได้ /sòp dâai to/ pass a test
เสมอ /sà-mĕr/ always
ห้างสรรพสินค้า /hâang sàp sĭn káa/ shopping mall (center)
ใหม่ /mài/ new
อาหารกลางวัน /aa-hăan glaang-wan/ lunch
อินเทอร์เน็ต /in-têr-nét/ Internet

Examples of Thai Pronouns sentences…

จะไปตลาด
jà bpai dtà-làat

จะซื้อให้
jà séu hâi

ผม เห็น สมบัติ ที่ ตลาด
pŏm hĕn sŏm-bàt têe dtà-làat

มาลี คุย กับ ผม ที่ ห้างสรรพสินค้า
maa-lee kui gàp pŏm têe hâang sàp sĭn káa

ผม จะ เล่น เปีย โน
pŏm jà lên bpia noh

ครู ให้ ผม “A” ใน ทดสอบ
kroo hâi pŏm “A” nai tót sòp 

ดิฉัน จะ แต่งงาน กับ คุณ ปรีชา
dì-chăn jà dtàeng ngaan gàp kun bpree-chaa

คุณ ปรีชา จะ แต่งงาน กับ ดิฉัน
kun bpree-chaa jà dtàeng ngaan gàp dì-chăn

อยาก ไป ช้อปปิ้ง กับ ดิฉัน ไหม
yàak bpai chóp-bpîng gàp dì-chăn măi

ดิฉัน เคย ทาน อาหาร กลางวัน ที่ ร้าน อาหาร ฝรั่งเศส
dì-chăn koie taan aa hăan glaang wan têe ráan aa hăan fà-ràng-sàyt

ฉัน จะ ซื้อ รถ ใหม่
chăn jà séu rót mài

สุมาลี ซื้อ อาหารกลางวัน ให้ ฉัน
sù maa-lee séu aa-hăan glaang-wan hâi chăn

คุณ อยาก จะ ไป ดู หนัง กับ ฉัน ไหม
kun yàak jà bpai doo năng gàp chăn măi

ฉัน สอบ ได้
chăn sòp dâai

เมื่อวาน สุขใจ โทร หา ฉัน
mêua waan sùk-kà-jai toh hăa chăn

ฉัน รัก เธอ
chăn rák ter

น้อย รัก แดง
nói rák daeng

คุณ จะ ไป ไหน
kun jà bpai năi

ใคร จะ ไป กับ คุณ?
krai jà bpai gàp kun

คุณ กำลัง ใช้ อินเทอร์เน็ต หรือ เปล่า
kun gam-lang chái in-têr-nét rĕu bplào

ผม จะ พา คุณ กลับ บ้าน
pŏm jà paa kun glàp bâan

เธอ จะ ชอบ หนัง (เรื่องนี้)
ter jà chôp năng (rêuang née)

เพื่อน ของ เธอ ต้องการ ให้ เธอ ร้อง เพลง
pêuan kŏng ter dtông gaan hâi ter róng playng

เธอ จะ กิน ก๋วยเตี๋ยว วันนี้ ไหม
ter jà gìน gŭay-dtĭeow wan née măi

ฉัน ใช้ คอม ของ เธอ ได้ ไหม
chăn chái kom kŏng ter dâai măi

แดง ก็ รัก น้อย
daeng gôr rák nói

เรา จะ ทาน อาหารกลางวัน ด้วยกัน
rao jà taan aa-hăan glaang-wan dûay gan

มาลี เอา ผัก ให้ เรา
maa-lee ao pàk hâi rao

เรา ทุกคน เล่น ฟุตบอล
rao túk kon lên fút bon

คุณ ครู จะ สอน เรา วันเสาร์
kun-kroo jà sŏn rao wan săo

เขา (เธอ) มา เร็ว เสมอ
kăo (ter) maa reo sà-mĕr

เขา (เธอ) จะ เอา พริก ไหม
kăo (ter) jà ao prík măi

บอก เขา (เธอ) ว่า บ้าน คุณ อยู่ ที่ ไหน
bòk kăo (ter) wâa bâan kun yòo têe năi

พวกเขา มา เร็ว เสมอ
pûak kăo maa reo sà-mĕr

พวกเขา จะ เอา พริก ไหม
pûak kăo jà ao prík măi

ให้ โทรศัพท์มือถืออัน ใหม่ (แก่) พวกเขา
hâi toh-rá-sàp meu tĕu an mài (gàe) pûak kăo

บอก พวกเขา ว่า บ้าน คุณ อยู่ ที่ ไหน
bòk pûak kăo wâa bâan kun yòo têe năi

ลุง ต้องการ น้ำ เย็น
lung dtông gaan nám yen

เมื่อไร พี่ จะ มา
mêua rai pêe jà maa

ครู จะ ช่วย หนู
kroo jà chûay nŏo

นาย จะ ตี กอล์ฟ พรุ่งนี้ ไหม
naai jà dtee góf prûng-née măi

ช่วย พี่ หน่อย
chûay pêe nòi

เค้า กับ ตัว จะ ไป ด้วยกัน
káo gàp dtua jà bpai dûay gan

พี่ จะ เลี้ยง น้อง
pêe jà líang nóng

Audio and Pdf Downloads…

Docx download (with transliteration): Pronouns
Docx download (sans transliteration): Pronouns
Audio download: Pronouns Audio

Share Button

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Please and Thank You and Excuse Me: Part 3

The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation…

“Forgive-i-ness please”
The Japanese Yakusa chief bows and apologizes after he falls through
the Simpson’s kitchen window while fighting the Italian Mafia.
– The Simpsons, Season 8

Please and Thank You and Excuse Me…

It is interesting that many of the Thai words for excuse me have the same beginning as the Thai expressions for please, ขอ /kŏr/ – “to ask for”. With please we are asking for something or for someone to do something for us. With excuse me we are often asking for “forgiveness”, and in the most frequently used Thai form of excuse me or I’m sorry, we are literally asking for “punishment”.

ขอโทษ /kŏr tôht/ – “Please punish me”. The word โทษ /tôht/ means to “blame” or “accuse”. The phrase ทำโทษ /tam tôht/ means to punish. But in everyday usage ขอโทษ /kŏr tôht/ simply means “Excuse me”.

For just about any situation you would use Excuse me in English you can usually use ขอโทษ /kŏr tôht/ in Thai. For 95% of apologies in Thai ขอโทษ /kŏr tôht/ will suffice.

When you bump into someone:

ขอโทษ ครับ/ค่ะ
kŏr tôht · kráp/ká
Excuse me.

You ask permission to walk between two people (something that should be avoided in Thailand unless it is necessary to get to where you need to go):

ขอโทษ ครับ/ค่ะ ขอ ผ่าน หน่อย
kŏr tôht kráp/ká kŏr pàan nòi
Excuse me. Please allow me to pass.

As an opener when asking someone a question:

ขอโทษ คุณ ชื่อ อะไร ครับ/คะ
kŏr tôht kun chêu a-rai kráp/ká
Excuse me, what is your name?

One use of this phrase is quintessential Thai. Very often someone who wants to be polite in referring to their feet or shoes, like “look at my news shoes”, “I stubbed my toe”, “my feet are sore”, will begin the sentence with ขอโทษ /kŏr tôht/ since the feet can be considered a rude topic of discussion (“excuse me for talking about my feet but …”)

You want to show your friend your broken toenail to get some sympathy:

ขอโทษ เล็บเท้า แตก, มัน เจ็บ มาก
kŏr tôht lép táo dtàek, man jèp mâak
My toenail is broken and it really hurts.

You show off your new shoes to a friend:

ขอโทษ จ้ะ, รองเท้า ใหม่ ของ ฉัน สวย ไหม
kŏr tôht jà, rong táo mài kŏng chăn sŭay măi
Do you think my new shoes are pretty?

The Thai phrase ขอโทษ /kŏr tôht/ is good for 95% of your excuse me’s, but for the 5% leftover, Thai has a number of different ways to say excuse me, I’m sorry, apologies, etc.

ขอ อภัย /kŏr a-pai/ – The word อภัย /a-pai/ means “pardon” or “forgiveness”. It is the root of the Thai phrases อภัยโทษ /a-pai tôht/ “to grant a pardon (legally)”, and ให้อภัย /hâi a-pai/ “to forgive”. It is not spoken often in Thai but you may see it on signs asking the public’s pardon.

ขอ อภัย กำลัง ก่อ สร้าง ถนน /kŏr a-pai gam-lang gòr sâang tà-nŏn/
Sorry for the inconvenience. Road under construction.

ขอ อนุญาต /kŏr a-nú-yâat/ – The word อนุญาต means to allow” or “give permission”. Not exactly an excuse me but using it is the equivalent to saying “pardon me, please allow me to…”

ขอโทษค่ะ ขอ(อนุญาต) จ่าย บิล ค่ะ
kŏr tôht kâ kŏr (a-nú-yâat) jàai bin kâ
Pardon, please allow me to pay the bill.

โทษ /tôht/ – As with so many Thai phrases, in certain informal situations you can revert to a contraction. In this case just leave out the ขอ /kŏr/.

โทษ ครับ/ค่ะ คุณ ทำ กระเป๋า ตก
tôht kráp/ká kun tam grà-bpăo dtòk
Excuse me. You dropped your bag.

ขอโทษ ที /kŏr tôht tee/ – And sometimes for a little added lyricism you can add a little ที.

ขอโทษ(ที) ผม ช้า ไป หน่อย
kŏr tôht (tee) pŏm cháa bpai nòi
Sorry I am a little late.

ขอโทษ ด้วย /kŏr tôht dûay/ – Similar to ที่ you can add the word ดว้ย.

ขอโทษ ด้วย ไม่ เห็น คุณ
kŏr tôht dûay mâi hĕn kun
Sorry, I didn’t see you.

โทษ ที่ /tôht têe/; โทษ ด้วย /tôht dûay/ – Or you can contract and add at the same time.

โทษ ที่ ทำ น้ำ หก (โทษ ด้วย น้ำ หก)
tôht têe tam nám hòk (tôht dûay nám hòk)
Sorry for spilling the water.

Very formal excuse me:

ประทานโทษ /bprà-taan tôht/ – The word ประทาน is a synonym of ขอ /kŏr/ in that they both mean “to ask for”. But whereas ขอ /kŏr/ is an everyday word ประทาน is one of those super formal words.

ประทาน โทษ ท่าน ผู้ว่า
bprà-taan tôht tâan pôo wâa
Pardon me governor.

ขอประทานโทษ /kŏr bprà-taan tôht/ – And we can make it even more formal by adding the ขอ /kŏr/ in front.

ขอ ประทาน โทษ ท่าน ผู้ว่า
kŏr bprà-taan tôht tâan pôo wâa
I beg your pardon governor sir.

Note: The word เสียใจ /sĭa jai/ means to be “sorry” but it is not the excuse me type of sorry but the “I feel bad for your loss” kind of sorry, and is not used in in asking for pardon.

Legal Pardon:

Another kind of “pardon” is the legal kind which exonerates someone who has been convicted of a crime. There are two kinds of pardons in Thailand.

อภัยโทษ /a-pai tôht/ – “forgive punishment”, a regular pardon.

พระราชทาน อภัยโทษ /prá râat taan a-pai tôht/ – You see the prefix พระราชทาน and you know it means “Royal”. Here it means “a royal pardon”. Often on his majesty the King’s birthday, royal pardons will be given to a number of prisoners. BTW, for those who have told you that Thai is a one-syllable-per-word language, you can ask them about this one.

Implied I’m sorry:

ไม่ได้ ตั้งใจ /mâi dâai dtâng jai/ – “did not do it on purpose”. ตั้งใจ means “intention”. In order to save face on the golf course, whenever I hit a tree and the ball luckily bounces right back onto the fairway I say ผม ตั้งใจทำ “I meant to do that.” The word เจตนา also means “intention”. Usually when we say we “didn’t mean” to do something, or “didn’t do it intentionally” there is an implied I’m sorry that goes along with that.

ผม ไม่ได้ ทำ โดยเจตนา
pŏm mâi dâai tam doi jàyt-dtà-naa

Or less formal:

ผม ไม่ได้ โดย เจตนา ทำ
pŏm mâi dâai jàyt-dtà-naa tam
I didn’t do that on purpose.

ผม ไม่ ทำ โดย เจตนา
pŏm mâi tam doi jàyt-dtà-naa
I didn’t do that intentionally.

I’m not sorry because…

แก้ ตัว /gâe dtua/ – Means “to make an excuse”. It is sort of the opposite of asking someone’s forgiveness by giving an excuse for doing what you did.

เขา แก้ ตัว ว่า ไม่ได้ ตั้ง ใจ (ทำ)
kăo gâe dtua wâa mâi dâai dtâng jai (tam)
He made the excuse saying that he didn’t mean (to do it).

Dictionary words:

ขอสมา /kŏr sà-maa/; ขอขมา /kŏr kà-măa/ both mean “to apologize”. These are what I refer to as dictionary words. If you look up “apologize” in the dictionary, a good one, you may come up with these. Otherwise you will probably never hear them in normal conversation.

Vocabulary used in this chapter…

กระเป๋า /grà-bpăo/ bag
ก่อสร้าง /gòr sâang/ construction
กำลัง /gam-lang/ makes a verb into a gerund (-ing)
จ่าย /jàai/ to pay
เจ็บ /jèp/ to hurt
ช้า /cháa/ slow, late
ชื่อ /chêu/ name
ตก /dtòk/ to fall, drop
แตก /dtàek/ cracked
ถนน /tà-nŏn/ street, road
ทำ /tam/ to do, make happen
เท้า /táo/ foot
น้ำ /nám/ water
บิล /bin/ bill (English loan word)
ผ่าน /pàan/ to pass
ผู้ว่า /pôo wâa/ abbre. for governor
รองเท้า /rong táo/ shoe
เล็บเท้า /lép táo/ toenail
สวย /sŭay/ beautiful
หก /hòk/ to spill
เห็น /hĕn/ to see
ใหม่ /mài/ new
อะไร /a-rai/ what

Examples of Thai excuse me in sentences…

ขอโทษ ครับ/ค่ะ
kŏr tôht · kráp/ká

ขอโทษ ครับ/ค่ะ ขอ ผ่าน หน่อย
kŏr tôht kráp/ká kŏr pàan nòi

ขอโทษ คุณ ชื่อ อะไร ครับ/ค่ะ
kŏr tôht kun chêu a-rai kráp/ká

ขอโทษ เล็บเท้า แตก, มัน เจ็บ มาก
kŏr tôht lép táo dtàek, man jèp mâak

ขอโทษ จ้ะ, รองเท้า ใหม่ ของ ฉัน สวย ไหม
kŏr tôht jà, rong táo mài kŏng chăn sŭay măi

ขอ อภัย กำลัง ก่อสร้าง ถนน
kŏr a-pai gam-lang gòr sâang tà-nŏn

ขอโทษ ค่ะ ขอ(อนุญาต) จ่าย บิล ค่ะ
kŏr tôht ká kŏr (a-nú-yâat) jàai bin ká

โทษ ครับ/ค่ะ คุณ ทำ กระเป๋า ตก
tôht kráp/ká kun tam grà-bpăo dtòk

ขอโทษ(ที่) ผม มา ช้า ไป หน่อย
kŏr tôht (têe) pŏm maa cháa bpai nòi

ขอโทษ ด้วย ไม่ เห็น คุณ
kŏr tôht dûay mâi hĕn kun

โทษ ที่ ทำ น้ำ หก (โทษ ด้วย น้ำ หก)
tôht têe tam nám hòk (tôht dûay nám hòk)

ประทานโทษ ท่าน ผู้ว่า
bprà-taan tôht tâan pôo wâa

ขอประทานโทษ ท่าน ผู้ว่า
kŏr bprà-taan tôht tâan pôo wâa

ผม ไม่ได้ ตั้ง ใจ ทำ
pŏm mâi dâai dtâng jai tam

ผม ไม่ได้ ทำ โดยเจตนา
pŏm mâi dâai tam doi jàyt-dtà-naa

ผม ไม่ได้ เจตนา ทำ
pŏm mâi dâai jàyt-dtà-naa tam

เขา แก ตั้ว ว่า ไม่ได้ ตั้ง ใจ (ทำ)
kăo gâe dtua wâa mâi dâai dtâng jai (tam)

Audio and Pdf Downloads…

Docx download (with transliteration): Thank You – Part 3
Docx download (sans transliteration): Thank You – Part 3
Audio download: Thank You – Part 3 Audio

Share Button

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Please and Thank You and Excuse Me: Part 2

The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation…

You’re my love, your my angel, you’re the girl of my dreams
I’d like to thank you, for waiting patiently
– Daddy’s Home Shep and the Limelites

Please and Thank You and Excuse Me…

I say “Thank You” to almost everybody for almost everything. It works for me.

Almost all Thai words for thank you have the root word ขอบ /kòp/. It has a few other meanings but ขอบ /kòp/ as a word-fragment cannot really be define other than it is used with a Thai Thank You.

A Thai thank you is expressed in much the same way as we would in English with an exception or two.

Interestingly enough, I do not often hear a thank you expressed by the customer when one buys something from a vendor or shopkeeper. In English we usually will offer a thank you as the shopkeeper hands you the thing you are buying, or when they return your change, but I rarely hear this from a Thai shopper. On the other hand, vendors will almost always offer a thank you to their customer.

It doesn’t matter to me though, I give a thanks anyway, as will most Thais who have empathy for those serving them. It just feels right.

ขอบคุณ /kòp kun/

Example of a simple thank you exchange.

You: ขอบคุณ /kòp kun/
Answer: ไม่เป็นไร /mâi bpen rai/

ขอบคุณ /kòp kun/ has the word คุณ /kun/ embedded in it, which makes up the “you” of thank you. We might say this simply, with no ending particle, possibly to a waitress as she places your order on the table, or the postman as he hands you a package.

The answer ไม่เป็นไร /mâi bpen rai/ is sometimes translated as It’s nothing” which is the literal meaning, or “Never mind” which was made famous (although only partly accurate) in a popular book written by an American in the 1960s, Mai Pen Rai Means Never Mind, Carol Hollinger (subtitled, an American Housewife’s Honest Love Affair with the Irrepressible People of Thailand), Asia Books, an early attempt to try and understand the Thai culture. But as a response to ขอบคุณ /kòp kun/, ไม่เป็นไร /mâi bpen rai/ should be interpreted as “You’re welcome”.

We can give a thanks with a little more politeness, and a little more gratefulness.

ขอบคุณ ครับ/ค่ะ /kòp kun kráp/ká/

Adding the polite particle at the end is always a good idea, especially if someone has given us something or done something for us.

Even more:

ขอบคุณ มาก ครับ/ค่ะ /kòp kun mâak kráp/ká/

The word มาก /mâak/ adds a “very much” to our thank you, but don’t worry, you won’t sound too much like Elvis’ “Thank you very much.”

More still:

ขอ ขอบคุณ ครับ/ค่ะ /kŏr kòp kun kráp/ká/

The ขอ /kŏr/ as we remember adds a “please” to your thank you. And since it is a bit formal could be interpreted as something like “Allow me to offer you my thanks.”

ขอบใจ /kòp jai/

This is not a term we would use with adults, even close ones. It is more reserved to be used with children, although some people will use it with someone serving them, especially if they are much younger. It doesn’t mean one is looking down on the person being spoken to and in many cases can be a term of endearment, especially if one uses the Thai ending particle จ้ะ /jâ/.

ขอบใจ จ้ะ /kòp jai jâ/

Thank you in context.

Thank you when someone gives you something:

A friend gives you a birthday present
ขอบคุณ สำหรับ ของขวัญ วันเกิด /kòp kun săm-ràp kŏng kwăn wan gèrt/

Thank you for the birthday present.

You ask someone for a pen and she gives it to you
ขอ ปากกา หน่อย /kŏr bpàak gaa nòi/
(She gives you a pen)
ขอบคุณ ครับ/ค่ะ /kòp kun kráp/ká/

May I have a pen please? Thanks.

You borrow some money from your father-in-law.
ขอขอบคุณ มาก ครับ/ค่ะ ที่ ให้ ผม ยืม เงิน
/kŏr kòp kun mâak kráp/ká têe hâi pŏm yeum ngern/

Thank you so much for lending me the money.

Your daughter hands you a plate for dinner.
ขอบใจ หนูจ้ะ /kòp jai nŏo jà/
Thank you dear.

When a guard at a gate hands you a card you will need to present when exiting. As he hands you the card you can say thank you using a contraction.

คุณ ครับ/ค่ะ /kun kráp/ká/
Thanks.

Thank you when someone does something for you:

Your daughter visits you in the hospital
ขอบใจ ที่ มา เยี่ยม พ่อ /kòp jai têe maa yîam pôr/
Thanks for visiting Dad (me). Thanks for coming.

Thank you when someone helps you:
ขอบคุณ ที่ ช่วย /kòp kun têe chûay/
Thanks for the help (for helping).

ขอบพระคุณ – /kòp prá-kun/ A very formal way to say thank you. Your mother-in-law gives you a new motorcycle. The in-fix of พระ, a word often used for monks and clergy, makes it special.

ขอบพระคุณ ครับ/ค่ะ /kòp prá-kun kráp/ká/
Thank you sooo much.

Honorable Mentions…

ยินดี /yin dee/ (Lanna Thai for thank you)

The word ยินดี in Central Thai means to be “happy” to do something, “to be pleased”. (Ex. ยินดี ที่ รู้จัก /yin dee têe róo jàk/ – Good to know you, Glad to meet you). But in the Lanna dialect of Chiang Mai and the north it means thank you.

If you want to throw in a polite particle as a male you could say it the way northern Thais say it, without the initial consonant cluster. It is pronounced คับ /káp/. The northern Thai woman say the lyrical เจ้า /jâo/.

ยินดี คับ/เจ้า /yin dee káp/jâo/

Then there is Issan Thai. This is a term that lots of Bangkokians use to sound humerous.

ขอบใจหลาย ๆ เด้อ /kòp jai lăai lăai dêr/
Issan for Thanks a lot.

Note: Just yesterday I heard a Bangkokian say “thank you หลาย ๆ” /thank you lăai lăai/, mixing the two languages in a humorous way, when I gave him a glass of beer. I think maybe the beer helped his creativity.

ขอบคุณ ที่ อ่าน /kòp kun têe àan/
Thanks for reading.

Vocabulary used in this chapter…

ของขวัญ /kŏng kwăn/ present
ช่วย /chûay/ to help
ปากกา /bpàak gaa/ pen
พ่อ /pôr/ father
มา เยี่ยม /maa yîam/ to come for a visit
ไม่เป็นไร /mâi bpen rai/ Never mind, Don’t mention it, You’re welcome
ให้ ยืม เงิน /hâi yeum ngern/ to lend
รู้จัก /róo jàk/ to know
วันเกิด /wan gèrt/ birthday
สำหรับ /săm-ràp/ for

Examples of Thai Thank You sentences…

ขอบคุณ /kòp kun/

ขอบคุณ ครับ/ค่ะ /kòp kun kráp/ká/

ขอบคุณ มาก ครับ/ค่ะ /kòp kun mâak kráp/ká/

ขอ ขอบคุณ ครับ/ค่ะ /kŏr kòp kun kráp/ká/

ขอบใจ จ้ะ /kòp jai jâ/

ขอบคุณ สำหรับ ของขวัญ วันเกิด
kòp kun săm-ràp kŏng kwăn wan gèrt

ขอขอบคุณ มาก ครับ/ค่ะ ที่ให้ผมยืมเงิน
kòp kun mâak kráp/ká têe hâi pŏm yeum ngern

คุณ ครับ/ค่ะ /kun kráp/ká/

ขอบใจ ที่ มา เยี่ยม พ่อ /kòp jai têe maa yîam pôr/

ขอบคุณ ที่ ช่วย /kòp kun têe chûay/

ขอบพระคุณ ครับ/ค่ะ /kòp prá-kun kráp/ká/

ยินดี คับ/เจ้า /yin dee káp/jâo/

ขอบใจหลาย ๆ เด้อ /kòp jai lăai lăai dêr/

ขอบคุณ ที่ อ่าน /kòp kun têe àan/

Audio and Pdf Downloads…

Pdf download (with transliteration): Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Please – Part 2
Pdf download (sans transliteration): Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Please – Part 2
Audio download: Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Please 2 Audio

Share Button

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Please and Thank You and Excuse Me: Part 1

The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation…

Oh, won’t you stay…just a little bit longer.
Please, please, please, please, please.
Tell me you’re going to.
– Maurice Williams and The Zodiacs

Please and Thank You and Excuse Me…

One of the nicest things a Thai will say about you, besides how good looking you are and how well you speak Thai (which should always be taken with a grain of salt) is that you are such a polite person; that you are สุภาพ /sù-pâap/.

Nothing will tell a Thai listener how สุภาพ /sù-pâap/ you are better than your correct usage of the many Thai expressions for Please, Thank You, and Excuse Me. Like we tell our children, they are magic words, and because of that they are part of the Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation.

Just like in most languages Thai has many ways to say each. It is important to know the different phrases in Thai because they can indicate how much we feel the emotion expressed, how respectful we want to be, and to whom we are speaking.

For this post we’ll concentrate on ‘please’.

Please…

“Please” is a big word. We can use it when we are asking for something, when we are asking for someone to do something, or when we are pleading for one of them. When using “please” in Thai we need to consider the above as well as to whom we are speaking.

The following are some of the ways to say “please” in Thai. We’ll give situations and examples of usage. As with all Thai patterns you can always use the Thai polite ending particles depending on to whom you are asking.

ขอ /kŏr/…

This is “please” when we ask for, or when we request something, or for someone to do something (for us).

Aside: The Thai word เอา /ao/ can mean “give me”. It is asking for something without the “please”. In the following examples the word ขอ /kŏr/ can be replaced with เอา /ao/ changing it from a request “please can I have …” to an order “give me …”. But we’ll stick with requests for now.

Usage examples:

You ask a vendor for something:
ขอ กาแฟเย็น /kŏr gaa-fae yen/ – Ice coffee please.
ขอ กาแฟเย็น สอง แก้ว /kŏr gaa-fae yen song gâew/ – Two glasses of ice coffee please.
ขอ ข้าวผัด หมู /kŏr kâao pàt mŏo/ – I’ll have some pork fried rice please.
ขอ ข้าวผัด หมูร้อนๆ /kŏr kâao pàt mŏo rón rón/ – Pork fried rice, hot please.

You ask your gardener to do something for you:
ขอ เล็ม ต้นไม้ /kŏr lem dtôn máai/ – Please prune the tree.
ขอ กวาด พื้น /kŏr gwàat péun/ – Please sweep the floor.

ขอ… หน่อย /kŏr… nòi/…

The same use of “please” as above but the use of หน่อย /nòi/ (literally “…a bit”, “…somewhat”, “…to some extent”) softens it. The meaning of the two patterns is basically the same but this pattern makes it more of a heart-felt request.

Usage examples:

You ask a vendor for something:
ขอ กาแฟเย็น หน่อย /kŏr gaa-fae yen nòi/ – May I have some ice coffee please.
ขอ กาแฟเย็น สอง แก้ว หน่อย /kŏr gaa-fae yen song gâew nòi/ – Can I have two glasses of ice coffee please.
ขอ ข้าวผัด หมูหน่อย /kŏr kâao pàt mŏo nòi/ – I’d would like some pork fried rice please.
ขอ ข้าวผัด หมูร้อนๆ หน่อย /kŏr kâao pàt mŏo rón rón nòi/ – Some nice and hot pork fried rice please.

You ask your gardener to do something for you:
ขอ เล็ม ต้นไม้ หน่อย / kŏr lem dtôn máai nòi / – Can you please prune the tree.
ขอ กวาด พื้น หน่อย / kŏr gwàat péun nòi / – Please sweep the floor (for me).

Adding the Thai polite particle…

You are asking your wife (very nicely) to do something for you.

Usage examples:

ขอ ทำไข่ เจียว หน่อย ครับ /kŏr tam kài jieow nòi kráp/ – Can you please make some scrambled eggs (for me).
Tip: Said with a sweet sing-songy voice works best.

ช่วย /chûay/…

The word ช่วย /chûay/ literally means “help”. We can use it to replace the “please” word ขอ /kŏr/ above when we are asking someone to do something. The meaning of the sentences would be exactly the same.

Examples of ขอ = ช่วย:
ขอ กวาด พื้น หน่อย /kŏr gwàat péun nòi/ – Please sweep the floor (for me).
ช่วย กวาด พื้น หน่อย /chûay gwàat péun nòi/ – Please sweep the floor (for me).
ขอ ทำไข่ เจียว หน่อย ครับ /kŏr tam kài jieow nòi kráp/ – Can you please make some scrambled eggs (for me).
ช่วย ทำไข่ เจียว หน่อย ครับ /chûay tam kài jieow nòi kráp/ – Can you please make some scrambled eggs (for me).

Usage examples:

ช่วย เรียก แคดดี้ สอง คน /chûay rîak kâet-dêe sŏng kon/ – Please call for two caddies (said every time I am at the golf course)
ช่วย เปิด สเตอริโอ เบาๆ หน่อย /chûay bpèrt STEREO bao bao nòi/ – Please turn down the stereo.
ช่วย ผม แปล เป็น ภาษาไทย /chûay pŏm bplae bpen paa-săa tai/ – Please help me translate this into Thai.

Adding the Thai polite particle…

You are asking your significant other (very nicely) to do something for you.

Usage examples:

ช่วย ทิ้ง ขยะ หน่อย คะ /chûay tíng kà-yà nòi ká/ – Please throw out the garbage.
Tip: Said with a sweet sing-songy voice works best.

Important…

An important use of the word ช่วย /chûay/ is if we ever find ourselves in trouble and we need to call for help, as in “HELP!!!!” we use the Thai exclamation.

ช่วย ด้วย! /chûay dûay/ – Please Help me!
Tip: Best said at the top of your lungs.

ช่วย ด้วยยยยยยย! /chûay dûaaaaaaaaay/ – Heeeeeeeeeelp!

Please words…

The following are four “please” words we use in formal or written language. They are not often heard, except maybe in a formal TV interview. You won’t have to say them to anybody, but you’ll see them written frequently, especially on signs requesting the public to do one thing or another.

โปรด /bpròht/
You’ll see this sign in most buildings and offices today.

โปรด งด สูบ บุหรี่ /bpròht ngót sòop bù rèe/ – Please refrain from smoking, No smoking please.

The meaning of โปรด /bpròht/ is “please” but it is a strong “please” like when Mom used to tell you “Please come home before midnight.” Not really asking, but telling.

Another meaning of โปรด /bpròht/ is “favorite”. You can say something like:
ข้าวผัด เป็น ของ โปรด /kâao pàt bpen kŏng bpròht/ – Fried rice is my favorite.

กรุณา /gà-rú-naa/
You may see this sign on the steps of a temple building.

กรุณา ถอด รองเท้า /gà-rú-naa tòt rong táo/ – Please take off your shoes.

The word กรุณา /gà-rú-naa/ also means “compassion” or “mercy”, especially in religious and Buddhist discussions. A pneumonic to help to remember is กรุณา ถอด รองเท้า – is like saying “please have mercy on us (have compassion, empathize with us) and take off your shoes.”

ขอความกรุณา /kŏr kwaam gà-rú-naa/

It has both ขอ and กรุณา making it a heavy duty “please”. More like “I beseech you.’ or “I beg you.’

ขอความกรุณา ยืม เงิน ให้ ผม /kŏr kwaam gà-rú-naa yeum ngern hâi pŏm/ – Please, I beseech you, lend me some money.

ขอร้อง /kŏr róng/
You might see this sign in a library.

ขอร้อง ไม่ ทำเสียง ดัง /kŏr róng mâi tam sĭang dang/ – Quiet please!

ขอร้อง /kŏr róng/ is sort of an appeal to your better angels.

Vocabulary used in this post…

กรุณา /gà-rú-naa/ please, compassion, mercy
กวาด /gwàat/ to sweep
กาแฟ /gaa-fae/ coffee
แก้ว /gâew/ glass, classifier for glass of something
ขยะ /kà-yà/ garbage
ของ โปรด /kŏng bpròht/ favorite (thing)
ข้าวผัด /kâao pàt/ fried rice
ไข่ /kài/ egg
ไข่ เจียว /kài jieow/ scrambled egg
คน /kon/ person, classifier for a person
แคดดี้ /kâet-dêe/ caddie (loan word)
งด /ngót/ to refrain from
เงิน /ngern/ money
เจียว /jieow/ to mix
ช่วย /chûay/ to help
ช่วย ด้วย /chûay dûay/ help!
ดัง /dang/ loud
ต้นไม้ /dtôn máai/ tree, plant
ถอด /tòt/ to take off
ทำ /tam/ to do, to make
ทิ้ง /tíng/ to throw away, throw out
หน่อย /nòi/ “…a bit”, “…somewhat”, “…to some extent”
บุหรี่ /bù rèe/ cigarette
เบาๆ /bao bao/ softly
เปิด /bpèrt/ to open, to turn on
แปล /bplae/ to translate
พื้น /péun/ floor
ภาษาไทย /paa-săa tai/ Thai (language)
ยืม /yeum/ to borrow
เย็น /yen/ cool
รองเท้า /rong táo/ shoes
ร้อน /rón/ hot
เรียก /rîak/ to call
เล็ม /lem/ to trim
สเตอริโอ /STEREO/ stereo (loan word)
สุภาพ /sù-pâap/ polite
สูบ /sòop/ to pump, to smoke
สูบ บุหรี่ /sòop bù rèe/ to smoke cigarettes
เสียง /sĭang/ sound
เสียง ดัง /sĭang dang/ loud sound, noisy
หมู /mŏo/ pork, pig
ให้ ยืม /hâi yeum/ to lend
เอา /ao/ to take

Examples of Thai “please” sentences…

ขอ กาแฟเย็น หน่อย /kŏr gaa-fae yen nòi/

ขอ กาแฟเย็น สอง แก้ว หน่อย /kŏr gaa-fae yen song gâew nòi/

ขอ ข้าวผัด หมู หน่อย /kŏr kâao pàt mŏo nòi/

ขอ ข้าวผัด หมูร้อนๆ หน่อย /kŏr kâao pàt mŏo rón rón nòi/

ขอ เล็ม ต้นไม้ หน่อย /kŏr lem dtôn máai nòi/

ขอ กวาด พื้น หน่อย /kŏr gwàat péun nòi/

ขอ ทำไข่ เจียว หน่อย ครับ /kŏr tam kài jieow nòi kráp/

ช่วย เปิด สเตอริโอ เบาๆ หน่อย /chûay bpèrt STEREO bao bao nòi/

ช่วย ผม แปล เป็น ภาษาไทย /chûay pŏm bplae bpen paa-săa tai/

ช่วย ทิ้ง ขยะ หน่อย คะ /chûay tíng kà-yà nòi ká/

ช่วย ด้วย! /chûay dûay/

โปรด งด สูบ บุหรี่ /bpròht ngót sòop bù rèe/

กรุณา ถอด รองเท้า /gà-rú-naa tòt rong táo/

ขอความกรุณา ยืม เงิน ให้ ผม /kŏr kwaam gà-rú-naa yeum ngern hâi pŏm/

ขอร้อง ไม่ ทำเสียง ดัง /kŏr róng mâi tam sĭang dang/

Audio and Pdf Downloads…

Pdf download (with transliteration): Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Please
Pdf download (sans transliteration): Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Please

Audio download: Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Please Audio

Share Button

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Thai Greetings and Ending Particles

The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Thai Greetings and Ending Particles…

You say goodbye and I say hello – Beatles

The Thai formal greeting…

สวัสดี /sà-wàt-dee/ – hello, greetings, goodbye, farewell

First impressions are as important in Thailand as anywhere else, and the first impression one usually gives is how you say “Hello”. So this is our first of the Ten Essentials.

In order to use a Thai greeting successfully we need to know a little about Thai culture and history.

One of the first words a new Thai student learns is สวัสดี / sà-wàt-dee /, often phonetically transcribed as “sawasdee”, but the “s” at the end of the second syllable is pronounced as a “t”.

Every Thai textbook and teacher will tell you that this is the Thai word for “hello” and also for “goodbye”. But that isn’t the whole story.

Up until the 1930s Thais greeted each other without the use of สวัสดี /sà-wàt-dee/ (we’ll get to other Thai greetings below.) It is an invented word (by Phraya Upakit Silapasan of Chulalongkorn University) supposedly to help bring the Thai people into the modern era. It is probably based on the Sanskrit word svasti, and is now in common usage all over the country – but we should use this greeting, as well as most all the Thai language vocabulary and phrases we will be covering, with some caveats.

In order to use สวัสดี /sà-wàt-dee/ correctly we first need to understand how to use the Thai polite particles.

Thai polite particles…

A Thai particle is a word used at the end of a sentence or phrase – it doesn’t have a specific meaning but does imply a feeling and sometimes a relationship with the listener. Speaking Thai without the use of the ending particles can sound stilted, sometimes harsh, and lacking in fluency. And can often lead to the dreaded language faux pas.

There are many particles in Thai. The two most important ones, especially for beginning Thai students, are the ones used to express politeness.

ครับ /kráp/, rhymes with “up” – a polite particle used by males
Example: สวัสดี ครับ /sà-wàt-dee kráp/ – hello, goodbye

คะ /kâa/ – a polite particle used by females
Example: สวัสดี คะ /sà-wàt-dee kâa/ – hello, goodbye

It is important for Thais to use the polite ending particles at the end of most sentences when they are speaking in a formal situation, and speaking with someone older, or of a higher status, or someone of importance to you (e.g. your boss, your mother-in-law. a police officer, an immigration official).

The Thai wai…

We will often wai when we greet someone (or say Goodbye, or Thank you, or I’m sorry). In order to wai correctly you should first have a Thai teach you how to wai.

Or watch this video clip, How to Wai Properly (by Learn Thai with Mod) which is fun and will show you how and when to wai.

Usually the Thai wai is given as the greeting words are spoken (when meeting a new person, or someone older or someone with a higher status).

The younger person, the one with a lower status wais first and if a person wais you it is a social requirement for you to return the wai. We usually don’t wai children, people who work for us, or serving people – unless they wai us first. We wai monks but they do not return a wai.

When to use สวัสดี ครับ/คะ /sà-wàt-dee kráp/kâa/…

  • Said with people we first meet.
  • Said when we greet people in a fairly formal situation.
  • Said when we greet someone of a higher status or an older person.
  • Said when we greet an acquaintance we haven’t seen recently.
  • It is probably a good idea to say it to someone who says it to you first.
  • It is not necessarily said with people we meet often or daily as with coworkers, or family members.
  • We don’t usually say it with people who serve us or work for us.
  • It is usually not said to monks – although we do wai monks, but silently.
  • The younger person or the one with a lower status wais first and the older person returns the wai (exception: If you happen to be older than your mother-in-law it would suit you well if you were to wai first).

Conversation:

You are meeting the department head for the first time:
You: สวัสดี ครับ/คะ /sà-wàt-dee kráp/kâa/ (wai as you speak)
Dept. Head: สวัสดี คะ /sà-wàt-dee kâa/ (and she returns your wai)

You are visiting your mother-in-law:
You: สวัสดี ครับ/คะ /sà-wàt-dee kráp/kâa/ (and you wai her)
Mother-in-law: สวัสดี คะ /sà-wàt-dee kâa/ (she returns your wai)

Someone greets you first:
Your student: สวัสดี คะ /sà-wàt-dee kâa/ (she wais you)
You: สวัสดี ครับ/คะ /sà-wàt-dee kráp/kâa/ (you return her wai)

You are leaving a party and saying goodbye to the hostess:
You: สวัสดี ครับ/คะ /sà-wàt-dee kráp/kâa/ (wai only in formal situations)
Hostess: สวัสดี คะ /sà-wàt-dee kâa/ (she returns the wai if you wai)

When greeted with a perfunctory greeting, answer with a contraction:
Guard at gated community: สวัสดี ครับ /sà-wàt-dee kráp/ (as he salutes you)
You: ครับ/คะ /kráp/kâa/ (no need to wai)

Other forms of greetings…

Although สวัสดี /sà-wàt-dee/ is more or less the “official” Thai greeting, one does not hear it that often when close friends and acquaintances greet each other.

The following can all be used to greet someone close to you, like coworkers, drinking buddies, a paramour, anyone we feel comfortable with, and in less formal situations. No polite particles are required with them but you can say them just to add respect if you wish. No need to wai either.

These other forms of greetings probably shouldn’t be used with people of higher status or importance to you like your mother-in-law, etc. Then you can stick with สวัสดี/sà-wàt-dee/, and don’t forget the polite particle.

All the following are in the form of rhetorical questions but can be interpreted into English as a simple greeting. The conversations could all be interpreted as:

Them: Hello.
You: Hello.

ไป ไหน / bpai năi / – Where are you going?…

Ubiquitous, and rhetorical question. Doesn’t require a true answer. It is the Thai equivalent to the English, “How are you?” No one usually cares how you are. It is just a way to say “Hi”. Here no one really cares where you are going, so any answer is okay.

Some answers to ไป ไหน /bpai năi/:
ไป ตลาด /bpai dtà-làat/ – going to the market.
ไป เที่ยว /bpai tîeow/ – going to have some fun.
ไป ทำงาน /bpai tam ngaan/ – going to work.
ไม่ ไป ไหน /mâi bpai năi/ – not going anywhere.

Conversation:
Your boss: ไป ไหน /bpai năi/ – Where are you going?
You: ไป ทำงาน ครับ/คะ /bpai tam ngaan kráp/kâa/ – Going to work.
Your neighbor: ไป ไหน /bpai năi/ – Where are you going?
You: ไม่ ไป ไหน /mâi bpai năi/ – Nowhere (in particular).

ไป ไหน มา /bpai năi maa/ – Where are you coming from? (The มา /maa/, literally “to come” at the end indicates something you have just come from doing.

The same usage as the above but it may be obvious to the speaker that you are coming from somewhere or from doing something. It also doesn’t require a true answer.

Some answers to ไป ไหน มา /bpai năi maa/:
ไป ตลาด มา /bpai dtà-làat maa/ – I went to the market
ไป เที่ยว มา /bpai tîeow maa/ – I came back from doing some fun stuff.

Conversation:
A friend: ไป ไหน มา /bpai năi maa/ – Where are you coming from?
You: ไป ตลาด มา /bpai dtà-làat maa/ – I just went to the market.
Your in-law: ไป ไหน มา /bpai năi maa/ – Where are you coming from?
You: ไป เที่ยว มา /bpai tîeow maa/ – Coming back from hanging out.

กิน ข้าว หรือ ยัง /gin kâao rĕu yang/ – Have you eaten yet? (informal)

This is more or less taken word-for-word from a Chinese greeting. If you say that you haven’t eaten yet, many a friend would be obliged to take you out for a meal. So it is wise to say that you have already eaten, even if you have to bend the truth a bit.

Some answers to กิน ข้าว หรือ ยัง:
กิน แล้ว /gin láew/ – I’ve already eaten.
เรียบร้อย แล้ว /rîap rói láew/ – normally means “neat”, “everything is in order”, but here it is slang for “I have already eaten”.

Conversation:
A work colleague: กิน ข้าว หรือ ยัง /gin kâao rĕu yang/ – Have you eaten yet?
You: กิน แล้ว /gin láew/ – Yes I have.

ทาน ข้าว หรือ ยัง/ taan kâao rĕu yang / – Have you eaten yet? (a little formal)

The same as above except that the word ทาน is used instead of กิน. Both words mean “to eat” but ทาน is considered the more polite form. It is probably good to use ทาน as it works for close friends as well as the upper crust.

Some answers to ทาน ข้าว หรือ ยัง /taan kâao rĕu yang/:
ทาน แล้ว/ taan láew / – I’ve already eaten.
ทาน เรียบร้อย แล้ว / taan rîap rói láew / – I have already eaten.

Conversation:
Your boss: ทาน ข้าว หรือ ยัง/ taan kâao rĕu yang / – Have you eaten yet?
You: ทาน เรียบร้อย แล้ว ครับ/คะ / taan rîap rói láew kráp/kâa / – I’m okay.

เป็น อย่างไร บ้าง /bpen yàang rai bâang/ – How are you doing? How is it going?
เป็น ไง บ้าง /bpen ngai bâang/ – contraction of the above

Literally, “how are you?” A lot of new Thai speakers make the mistake of interpreting this question as being similar to the Thai inquiry about one’s health, สบายดี ไหม. เป็น อย่าง ไร บ้าง (usually shorten to เป็น ไง บ้าง) is often used to ask “what’s the matter?” if you notice something out of quilter. But it is also heard as a greeting, similar to the English “how are you?” which is in fact not a question about one’s health but simply a “hello”.

The answer to “how are you?” is quite often “how are you?” or a silent lift of the head (which you could also do in response to เป็น ไง บ้าง /bpen ngai bâang/).

Conversation:
Your friend: เป็น ไง บ้าง /bpen ngai bâang/ – How you doin’?
You: ดีมาก /dee mâak/ – Very well.
Your companion: เป็น ไง บ้าง /bpen ngai bâang/ – How you doin’?
You: ไม่ เป็น อะไร /mâi bpen a-rai/ – Nothing. I’m fine.

ว่า อย่าง ไร /wâa yàang rai/ – What’s up?
ว่า ไง /wâa ngai/ – contraction of the above

Literally “how do you say?” but as above it really means “hello”. This is another phrase that is more often shortened (ว่า ไง).

Conversation:
Your friend: ว่า ไง /wâa ngai/ – What do you say?
You: ว่า ไง /wâa ngai/ – What do you say?

เจอ กัน ใหม่ /jer gan mài/ – meet again
It is more or less the equivalent to the English “See you later”

Conversation:
Your friend: สวัสดี ครับ /sà-wàt-dee kráp/ – Goodbye
You: สวัสดี ครับ/คะ เจอ กัน ใหม่ ครับ/คะ /sà-wàt-dee kráp/kâa jer gan mài kráp/kâa/ – Goodbye. See you later.

สบาย ดี /sà-baai dee/ – Feeling good
Just wanted to add this one as it is really the greeting in the Lao language which is spoken widely in the northeast of Thailand.

Conversation:
Your Laotian friend: สบาย ดี /sà-baai dee/ – Hello
You: สบาย ดี /sà-baai dee/ – Hello

Time to leave…

Let’s say you are visiting with someone and you feel you have to leave. Thai has a few very polite ways of saying, “Gotta Go. Bye.”

ลาก่อน /laa · gòn/ (ลา /laa/ – to leave + ก่อน /gòn/ – before)
Goodbye, farewell

And to be quite polite you can ask permission.
ขอ ลา ก่อน /kŏr laa gòn/ (ขอ /kŏr/ – please)

Same as above but more like “With your permission …”

And even more apologetic:
ขอ ตัว /kŏr dtua/ (ตัว /dtua/ – body)
Excuse me, I beg to be excused

Conversation:
You: ขอโทษ ขอ ลา ก่อน ครับ/คะ /kŏr tôht kŏr laa gòn kráp/kâa/ – Apologies, please excuse me.
Your hostess: ไม่เป็นไร คะ /mâi bpen rai kâa/ – That’s alright.
You: ลา ก่อน ครับ/คะ เจอ กัน ใหม่ /laa gòn kráp/kâa jer gan mài/ – I have to go. See you soon.
Your hostess: เจอ กัน ใหม่ คะ /jer gan mài kâa/ – See you again.
You: ขอ ตัว ครับ/คะ /kŏr dtua kráp/kâa/ – With your permission I’ll take my leave.
Your hostess: เชิญ คะ /chérn kâa/ – Go right ahead.

Good morning, Good evening, Good night…

There are two very formal and not often used Thai greetings. You will probably not hear them in normal conversation but may hear a TV show host use it to greet their viewers.

The suffix สวัสดิ์ /sà-wàt/, the ดิ์ at the end is silent in these two greetings is an indication that they are also invented words similar to สวัสดี /sà-wàt-dee/.

อรุณ สวัสดิ์ /a-run sà-wàt/ – Good Morning
อรุณ /a-run/, pronounced /a-roon/ – dawn
สวัสดิ์ /sà-wàt/ – happiness
ราตรี สวัสดิ์ /raa-dtree sà-wàt/ – Good Evening, Good Night
ราตรี /raa-dtree/ – evening
สวัสดิ์ /sà-wàt/ – happiness

Note: There really isn’t an informal way of saying “good morning”, “good evening”, or “good night” in Thai. It will feel odd for most westerners not to wish someone a good morning or good night, but it is just not a requirement in Thai culture. If you use either of the above you might give your listener a good laugh.

Vocabulary used in this post…

เจอ /jer/ to meet
เชิญ /chérn/ to invite
เที่ยว /tîeow/ trip, fun
เรียบร้อย /rîap rói/ neat, orderly
แล้ว /láew/ already
ใหม่ /mài/ new, again
ไป /bpai/ to go
ไม่ /mâi/ no, not
ไม่เป็นไร /mâi bpen rai/ It doesn’t matter. Don’t mention it., etc.
ไหน /năi/ where
ก่อน /gòn/ before
กัน /gan/together
กิน /gin/ to eat
ขอ /kŏr/ please
ขอโทษ /kŏr tôht/ excuse me
ข้าว /kâao/ rice
ดี /dee/ good
ตลาด /dtà-làat/ market
ตัว /dtua/ body
ทาน /taan/ to eat
ทำงาน /tam ngaan/ to work
บ้าง /bâang/ some
มาก /mâak/ a lot
ยัง /yang/ yet
ราตรี /raa-dtree/ evening
ลา /laa/ to leave
ว่า /wâa/ to say
สบาย /sà-baai/ comfortable
สวัสดิ์ /sà-wàt/ happiness
หรือ /rĕu/ or
อย่างไร /yàang rai/ how
อรุณ /a-run/ dawn
อะไร /mâi bpen a-rai/ what

Review of Thai greetings…

สวัสดี ครับ /sà-wàt-dee kráp/

สวัสดี คะ /sà-wàt-dee kâa/

ไป ไหน /bpai năi/

ไป ไหน มา /bpai năi maa/

กิน ข้าว หรือ ยัง /gin kâao rĕu yang/

ทาน ข้าว หรือ ยัง /taan kâao rĕu yang/

เป็น อย่างไร บ้าง /bpen yàang rai bâang/

เป็น ไง บ้าง /bpen ngai bâang/

ว่า อย่าง ไร /wâa yàang rai/

ว่า ไง /wâa ngai/

ลาก่อน /laa gòn/

ขอ ตัว /kŏr dtua/

เจอ กัน ใหม่ /jer gan mài/

สบาย ดี /sà-baai dee/

อรุณ สวัสดิ์ /a-run sà-wàt/

ราตรี สวัสดิ์ /raa-dtree sà-wàt/

 

Audio and Pdf Downloads…

Pdf download (with transliteration): The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Thai Greetings and Ending Particles
Pdf download (sans transliteration): The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Thai Greetings and Ending Particles

Audio download: Thai Greetings and Ending Particles: Audio

Note: apologies for the background noise in Khun Phairoa’s recordings (she’s having difficulties finding a quiet place to record these days).

Share Button

The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Intro

The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation

The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation…

Let’s start at the very beginning. A very good place to start – Maria Von Trapp

I’m a big advocate for those learning Thai, especially if they are of a “mature age”. My latest blog post on Retire2Thailand, No Old Friend, You are Never Too Old discusses this at length.

Because of this interest I’ve been thinking about what would be most important for students of Thai (old or young) to focus on at the very beginning. The following is an introduction to an eBook I’m working on, The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation.

Each chapter will be posted as they come available (pdf and audio files included). Later, when the eBook is complete, you can download it for free.

This series is for basic beginners, and because of this, it will have transliteration. If you would like a pdf without transliteration please let us know via WLT’s contact page, or leave a comment under each post. There will now be two pdfs to download – one with transliteration and one without.

If there are questions on anything covered here, or in future postings, please leave them in the comments and I will try to answer.

Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Introduction…

Long before I retired to Thailand I lived in Seattle, Washington. Surrounded by lakes, rivers, oceans, and mountains, Seattle is a beautiful city and the people there have the seemingly contradictory lifestyles of being the best read people in the country and the people who spend the most time outdoors, on the water and in the mountains.

I fit right in, and when I wasn’t hunkered down reading on a rainy northwest day I was out in the mountains, rock climbing and glacier traversing (often in the rain). I joined The Mountaineers to learn as much as I could about the backcountry. Since the 1930s they have given courses that prepare climbing and hiking enthusiasts to travel and survive in the North Cascades and neighboring mountains, especially when “stuff happens”.

One of the most important things they stress is to always carry the Ten Essentials. This is from Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills.

  1. Map
  2. Compass
  3. Sunglasses and sunscreen
  4. Extra clothing
  5. Headlamp/flashlight
  6. First-aid supplies
  7. Firestarter
  8. Matches
  9. Knife
  10. Extra food

Many a time when I was out in the back country, never lost of course, but often confused, I was happy to have each and every one of them.

So when I started thinking about what would be the most important vocabulary a new learner of Thai would need to survive here in Thailand, the Ten Essentials came to mind.

I asked myself what are the 10 most essential sets of vocabulary items one would need as they begin their studies of Thai. These would be vocabulary you would need to get through your everyday existence here as you meet with people, buy stuff, pass the time of day, talk about yourself, ask about those you are talking to, get the things you need, learn more Thai, and all the good things that make living and communicating with others so interesting and enjoyable.

Other authors and teachers may come up with a different set of priorities, and maybe add a vocabulary group or two, but there is no question that the following Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation will give you a solid base to develop your Thai language.

The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation…

  1. Thai greetings and ending particles.
  2. “Please” and “Thank You” and “Excuse Me”.
  3. Personal pronouns and how to refer to yourself, family members, and to others.
  4. Essential verbs. Subject + verb (+ object) patterns. Speaking in the present, past, and future.
  5. Adjectives and adjective word order.
  6. Asking and answering:
    • yes/no questions
    • when questions
    • where questions
    • who questions
    • how questions
    • how much questions
  7. Vocabulary you’ll need in order to ask if a person (shopkeeper, clerk, etc.) has the thing you are looking for.
  8. Vocabulary that is important and interesting to you (your own personal idiolect). Find the nouns that fit your needs. We’ll look at 10 common topics of interest; here are a few examples:
    • Enjoy gardening? Learn the Thai words for the plants, insects, and birds you will encounter.
    • Enjoy eating Thai food? Learn to order all the Thai dishes you like.
    • Enjoy cooking Thai food? Learn all the names of the condiments and sauces that you will need.
  9. Increase your vocabulary by asking:
    • “What is this?”
    • “How do you say … in Thai?”
    • “How can I translate …?”
  10. Vocabulary and patterns you will need to talk to a doctor, or a pharmacist, and how to tell them and your Thai companion(s) how you feel.

Class influence on our vocabulary choices…

Thai is a class society. One’s status in Thai society is very important in relationships and also in the language choices we make. We may come from a culture where social status is unimportant. We would speak mostly the same way to our parents, our children, our teachers, our boss, our gardener, or a waitress. That is not the case in Thailand.

Money, educational level, age, relationships, type of work one does, and family history, these are some of the influences on one’s status in Thai society and thus the language choices they make. Luckily for most of us, foreigners, maybe because they supposedly (and not always true) have lots of money, and a high education level, are usually looked at as having a fairly high status.

Our social status, and that of to whom we are speaking, will have an influence on which words we choose to use in our daily conversations. Ignoring a listener’s status (compared to our own) is the best way to commit a language faux pas in Thailand.

Thais understand these relationships, like they understand which grammar patterns to use, without having to think about it. But this is something most foreigners must learn.

When presenting vocabulary, we will try to indicate with whom it would be best used so that we can avoid those language faux pas.

More about the series…

The posts in this series will cover each of the above Ten Essentials. We want to make this more than a simple phrase book so the vocabulary you’ll need will be discussed in its linguistic and cultural context.

Each item will be written in Thai script, but phonetic transcriptions are also given for those just beginning with Thai. As previously mentioned, if you need a pdf without transliteration, contact us via WLT’s contact form or leave a comment.

At the end of each chapter will be a review of all the vocabulary and patterns that have been presented. If you want you can review the vocabulary before diving into the chapter.

Suggestion: Get a good teacher but until you find one use one of the “talking” dictionaries to help with pronunciation.

At the end of each lesson, important Thai phrases will be linked to audio recordings by a Thai native speaker. This should help when a Thai teacher is not available to you. Individual vocabulary items can also be cut and pasted into Google Translate to use the audio feature. It is quite good.

Take your time and go through each chapter in any order that suits you. You won’t learn Thai in a few days, but with a solid base you can add to your Thai language knowledge daily.

Learn these Ten Essentials and you’ll more than survive in Thailand, you’ll thrive.

Pdf download: The Ten Essentials of Thai Conversation: Intro

Share Button
Older posts